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(115)

Rank #29 in Food category

Arts
Food

The Food Chain

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #29 in Food category

Arts
Food
Read more

The Food Chain examines the business, science and cultural significance of food, and what it takes to put food on your plate.

Read more

The Food Chain examines the business, science and cultural significance of food, and what it takes to put food on your plate.

iTunes Ratings

115 Ratings
Average Ratings
89
15
4
7
0

Interesting & Informative

By SusanCooks - Jul 06 2018
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This podcast is the only food-related show that focuses on the business, technology, and culture of food. This unique perspective has been very enlightening. I want to know where my food comes from and how it is processed and this show has answered many of those questions and more. I also appreciate the cultural significance of food that is discussed on this show. Give it a listen!

I would love to give this podcast 5 stars...but

By BuffaloNic - May 04 2018
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Superb podcast as far as content, reporting, attitude, and topics. Why did I take one star away? Because the music can be intrusive and jarring at times. I will keep listening, but I find this in many "over-produced" podcasts: the music is too noticeable. It's not the main feature of the podcast; nor, is it what people are generally coming to the podcast to hear. I believe most uf us are there for the content and intellectual fodder.

iTunes Ratings

115 Ratings
Average Ratings
89
15
4
7
0

Interesting & Informative

By SusanCooks - Jul 06 2018
Read more
This podcast is the only food-related show that focuses on the business, technology, and culture of food. This unique perspective has been very enlightening. I want to know where my food comes from and how it is processed and this show has answered many of those questions and more. I also appreciate the cultural significance of food that is discussed on this show. Give it a listen!

I would love to give this podcast 5 stars...but

By BuffaloNic - May 04 2018
Read more
Superb podcast as far as content, reporting, attitude, and topics. Why did I take one star away? Because the music can be intrusive and jarring at times. I will keep listening, but I find this in many "over-produced" podcasts: the music is too noticeable. It's not the main feature of the podcast; nor, is it what people are generally coming to the podcast to hear. I believe most uf us are there for the content and intellectual fodder.
Cover image of The Food Chain

The Food Chain

Updated 1 day ago

Read more

The Food Chain examines the business, science and cultural significance of food, and what it takes to put food on your plate.

Rank #1: The Hidden Cost of a Home-Cooked Meal

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Who does the cooking in your house? In many cultures the responsibility for preparing meals at home traditionally falls to women. But as more women join the global workforce, traditional household responsibilities are changing. What impact is that having have on our internal family dynamics?
As part of the BBC's 100 Women season, we hear about the social and economic costs of putting a meal on the family table, when the most expensive ingredient is time.
Four women from different continents explain the challenges they face trying to balance family life, work, and food. A working mother in Mumbai tells us why she won't give up her kitchen, and a stay at home mum in New York explains why her working husband does most of the cooking. Plus, we hear that in parts of rural Kenya women who cannot cook are far from marriage material.
(Picture: A woman prepares vegetables in a village in Bangladesh. Credit: Jewel Samad, Getty Images)

Dec 03 2016

26mins

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Rank #2: Unseen: The Rise of Eating Disorders in China

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From diet pills to vomit rooms, the Food Chain investigates the rise of eating disorders in China. Is this an inevitable consequence of economic development? And if so, why are eating disorders still all too often seen as a rich white woman’s problem?’
In the first of two episodes to explore the rising prevalence of eating disorders outside of the western world, Emily Thomas speaks to women with the illness in China and Hong Kong, who explain how hard it is to access support for binge-eating disorder, bulimia and anorexia, because of attitudes to food and weight, taboos around mental health, and a lack of treatment options. They describe the pressure on women to be ‘small’ and ‘diminutive’, but still take part in the country’s deeply entrenched eating culture.
A psychiatrist working in China’s only closed ward for eating disorders blames an abundance of food in the country, parental attitudes and the competitiveness of Chinese society. She also warns of the dangers of the uncontrolled diet pill industry. From there we delve into the sinister world of ‘vomit bars’ with a social media analyst.
We also explore the link between the rise of eating disorders and economic development. Does there need to be an abundance of food in a society before these problems develop?
If you or someone you know has been affected by the issues in this programme, please see the links to resources at the bottom of this page.
(Photo: Woman behind glass. Credit: Getty Images)

Oct 04 2018

26mins

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Rank #3: In Search of Lost Foods

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What happens to a food when people stop eating it? Most of the food we eat today comes from a handful of crops, but before we became a globalised society, our diet reflected a variety of plants, proteins and foods that were cultivated as local specialties. Now, as our diets become less diverse, these foods face a critical point in their existence. In this programme the BBC's Dan Saladino explores several stories of foods that are dying out and talks to the farmers and producers who are working to save them.
(Photo: Mexican Blue Corn Credit: Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images)

Nov 12 2016

26mins

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Rank #4: Food Chain: The Quiz

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Have you ever wondered how many litres of water it takes to make one egg, or what links a 19th-Century electrician to modern pet food? Whose job was it to eat a corpse cake, what really happens when you burn your toast, and what are the world’s most powerful chili peppers?
For the answers to these and many more questions, join us for the ultimate test of culinary trivia in The Food Chain’s inaugural quiz. Get your pens ready and play along with our studio panel: BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones; BBC Radio 4 correspondent Matthew Price; Jozef Youssef, chef and founder of Kitchen Theory in London; and BBC World Service presenter Jackie Leonard.
(Photo: Flour plus egg equals spaghetti. Credit: Ryan Michael Rodrigo/EyeEm/Getty Images)

Dec 31 2016

26mins

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Rank #5: Full English Brexit

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Twentieth century British playwright and novelist Somerset Maugham said that to eat well in Britain, you should eat breakfast thrice daily. And, nothing speaks to British culinary tradition more than the Full English breakfast - bacon, sausages, egg, beans, black pudding and mushrooms all on one plate. But how much of the ‘full English’ today is actually English? And, in a post-Brexit United Kingdom, how will the industries that cater to British breakfasters fare?
The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa works her way through each food on the full English breakfast plate and explores how they could be impacted following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union. Ian Dunt, author of Brexit: What the Hell Happens Now?, explains why many believe food prices are set to eventually rise. The UK imports two thirds of its supply from neighbouring Ireland, but as the BBC’s Diarmaid Fleming finds out, some Irish mushroom farmers have already gone out of business. Claire Macleod of Charles Macleod Butchers tells us why Brexit has cast uncertainty on the future of her black puddings. And, we speak to the staff and diners of Brunchies Café in Sutton, south of London – are they concerned about adding a sprinkling of Brexit to their breakfast and if costs rise, is it a price worth paying?
(Photo: A traditional English breakfast plate, with Union Jack flag. Credit: Thinkstock)

Nov 26 2016

26mins

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Rank #6: Gordon Ramsay: My Life in Five Dishes

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Chef Gordon Ramsay is world-famous but, he tells us, people no longer want to talk about his food. The celebrity has become known as much for his cookery programmes, his fiery temper and explosive outbursts, as for his culinary skills.

This week, the focus is back on the food, as Gordon speaks to Emily Thomas about the five most memorable meals he has ever had and how they have shaped him as a chef - from his mother’s macaroni and cheese on a council estate in the West Midlands, to smuggled cheese soufflés at Le Gavroche.

Gordon's dishes are: Mum's Mac and Cheese with smoked bacon; soufflé Suissesse at Le Gavroche; braised pigs' trotters with cabbage at Casa Del Pescatore near Verona; rum baba at Le Louis XV; and his own chickpea curry.

(Photo: Gordon Ramsay. Credit: Robyn Beck/Getty Images)

Jan 18 2018

26mins

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Rank #7: Vegan Babies: Should You Restrict Your Child’s Diet?

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Are parents wrong to impose their own restrictive diets on their children? An Italian MP wants to jail parents who choose vegan or other “reckless” diets for their kids. But many of these families argue their children are healthy and happy. This week, we take a look at the implications of excluding certain foods from a child’s plate. Should children be encouraged to develop their own food choices regardless of their parents’ convictions? Vegan, veggie and Paleo parents talk to the BBC’s Manuela Saragosa.

(Photo: A child contemplates a plate of salad. Credit: Thinkstock)

Oct 22 2016

26mins

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Rank #8: Food and the Fall of the Berlin Wall

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As politics changes does our food follow suit? We hear how food tastes and names have altered according to the politics of the day.

Mangalitsa for example - a type of hairy pig - fell out of favour in communist times in Hungary, but is now back on the menu as a premium dish.

In China Kung Po chicken became known as Hongbao Jiding or Hula Jiding during the Cultural Revolution because it originally derived its name from an imperial official.

And 25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Domklause restaurant in the DDR museum is serving up food from an era when the city was divided.

Nov 14 2014

26mins

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Rank #9: Breast Practice

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As part of the BBC's 100 Women season, The Food Chain dedicates an episode to working mothers and how they feed their babies. More women are entering the global workforce, and many of them become mothers at a crucial point in their careers. But with the availability of parental leave as variable as there are countries in the world, many women must return to work while their child is still nursing. Meanwhile, the WHO says that a woman should exclusively breastfeed her child up to six months of age. So, how do you juggle the demands of feeding a baby with a working life? We'll hear about a project in Bangladesh that helps garment factory workers continue to breastfeed their babies, and we visit Indonesia where a taxi service exists to ferry breast milk from working mothers to waiting infants at home. And from Hong Kong to Ivory Coast, Manuela Saragosa reunites our panel of BBC correspondents - who are also working mothers - to discuss the challenges of reporting on their patch and pumping milk.
Image: Baby breastfeeding, Credit: Thinkstock
Featuring:
Dr. Larry Grummer-Strawn, World Health Organization

Phyllis Rippey, Professor of Sociology at the University of Ottawa

Micaela Collins, University of Toronto

Janet Golden, Professor of History at Rutgers University, New Jersey

Karishma Vaswani, BBC Asia Business Correspondent

Juliana Liu, BBC Hong Kong Correspondent

Tamasin Ford, BBC Ivory Coast Correspondent

Nov 28 2015

26mins

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Rank #10: Down with 'Foodies'?

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Is being cool a sign of culinary class? In the autumn of 2015 the Cereal Killer café in East London was attacked by protestors. They viewed it as a symbol of rapid gentrification - arguing that the cafe- which serves cereal from around the world- exemplified the rising inequality in the UK's capital. It led to some basic questions about running a food business. And the tensions between what’s trendy, what’s traditional and what’s affordable when it comes to eating out.
But a larger discussion, about conspicuous consumerism and the so- called ‘foodie movement’ looms. In this programme from London, Sarah Stolarz explores the intersections of city living, being upwardly mobile and the pursuit of the next best meal. We look at food trends and their irresistible appeal when it comes to social media- although it turns out, no one actually likes to be called a 'foodie'. Is access to new and varied food becoming more democratic, or are social media sites glossing over the surface of the culinary class wars? And what does that have to do with the price of pineapples?
Featuring:
Alan Keery: Co-Owner, Cereal Killer Café

Josėe Johnston: Author, 'Food, Democracy and Distinction in the Gourmet Foodscape'

Polly Russell: Curator at the British Library

@ClerkenwellBoyEc1

David Sax: Author of 'The Tastemakers: Why we're crazy for cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue'
Photo: multi-coloured macaroons, Credit: Thinkstock

Dec 12 2015

26mins

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Rank #11: How to cook for a megastar

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What do the most famous names in film, sport and politics eat for dinner, and what does it say about who they really are? Three private chefs give us the ultimate insight into the lives of the rich and famous - after all, what's more exposing than what and how we choose to eat?

Emily Thomas hears about the Premiership footballer who wanted to helicopter a chef to his home to make him and his girlfriend oven chips, the politician who had a romantic meal with not one, but three beautiful young women, and the Hollywood star who would only eat what she could squeeze into half of a small plastic cup.

How do you even become a private chef, and how much money can you make? And what happens when the person you are cooking for is not someone you want to pander to - a politician whose policies you can’t abide, or a celebrity whose private behaviour makes you uncomfortable?

Emily speaks to Charlotte Leventis, the London-based founder and executive chef of Extravaganza Food; Kwame Amfor, founder of Biishville, a Ghanaian catering company; and Kathleen Schaffer, the founder and creative director of Schaffer LA. Between them they’ve cooked for A-listers including Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, Idris Elba, Eddie Murphy, David Beckham and Kate Beckinsale.

(Picture: Kate Beckinsale, David Beckham and Idris Elba. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Oct 03 2019

26mins

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Rank #12: Sugar: A Love-Hate Relationship

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On average we consume some 27 kilos of sugar every year - and that figure is on the rise. But is that a good thing, or is sugar the root cause of many of the world's biggest, not-so-sweet, health concerns? Ed Butler speaks to professor Robert Lustig, who is leading the fight against sugar, and gets a response from Sugar Nutrition UK. We go to Berkeley, California where a tax on sugary drinks has just been implemented. And we hear from a couple who rowed from California to Hawaii on a sugar-free diet.

Jan 02 2015

26mins

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Rank #13: Chinatown

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Nearly every major city in the world has one- a district where Chinese immigrants have settled to live, work and eat. This week in a collaboration with BBC Radio 4’s ‘The Food Programme’, Dan Saladino takes you on a tour of Chinatowns around the world. From one of the oldest, in Manila, to one of the newest, in Johannesburg- Chinatowns create a global trail of economic and culinary influence. And the food that they serve reflects not only the tastes of home, but of the adopted countries. In this programme we ask how these urban communities reflect not only the history of Chinese immigration, but the changing role of China as a global power. Including visits to Havana, to look at the legacy of communism in a Chinatown that rarely serves Chinese food, and Shanghai, where the fortune cookie - a westernized version of Chinese cuisine is finding a new market at home.
Featuring:
Fuchsia Dunlop

Jennifer 8. Lee

Peter Kwong

Chan Chow Wah

Gerry Choo-ah

James Wong
With reporting from:
Vivienne Nunis

Celia Hatton and Maria Byrne

Victoria Phenethi

Will Grant
Photo: Gates of Chinatown, Credit: Thinkstock

Nov 21 2015

26mins

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Rank #14: Got Gumbo?

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What can one single dish tell you about America's history? One particular bowl of soup gives us an insight about the future of cultures that convene around it. Gumbo is eaten by nearly everyone in New Orleans, but its past speaks of the deep inequalities in American history that still resonate to this day. The BBC's Dan Saladino looks in to the origins of this dish and discovers influences from Native Americans, slaves from West Africa, settlers from Nova Scotia, and European immigrants from Spain, France and Italy. Dan tries to track down the perfect recipe for one of Louisiana's most famous dishes, and discovers how the politics of which food belongs to whom, is still at play, hundreds of years later.
(Image: A close up of a bowl of gumbo. Credit: Warren_Price/ Thinkstock)

Feb 04 2017

26mins

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Rank #15: Food Confidential

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Trade secrets are jealously guarded by the food industry – and confidentiality is becoming ever more important. The Food Chain is on a mission to find out why. Emily Thomas explores the best way is to protect a secret recipe, and finds out just how hard that is to do when thousands, even millions of people, have tried the dish. Plus, a so-called 'food hacker' recreates one of the world’s most iconic secret recipes, and a nose around a chocolate factory reveals the secrecy behind a good truffle.

This programme was first broadcast on 15 March 2018.

(Picture: Security camera on building, Credit: Getty Images)

Apr 11 2018

27mins

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Rank #16: Taking the Buzz out of Coffee

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A former-coffee lover goes on the hunt for a decent cup without the buzz, and discovers why it's so hard to get flavour without a fix.

Emily Thomas delves into the complex art of caffeine extraction and discovers that taste is not the only challenge when it comes to taking the bounce out of a bean. The environmental and economic costs of decaf coffee soon add up, meaning a cup may carry a higher carbon footprint and be made with cheaper beans than the full-blooded stuff.

Could a caffeine free coffee plant hold all the answers? A botanist explains why finding a suitable candidate is an unpalatable challenge.

Or are we being over sensitive? A scientist explains why some of us react badly to caffeine, whereas others can fall into a slumber after two espressos.

(Photo: Cup of coffee with drop suspended above it. Credit: BBC)

Dec 13 2018

26mins

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Rank #17: Fussy Old World

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The fussy toddler refuses to eat her vegetables, has a tantrum and throws the food on the floor in protest. It’s a familiar scene that haunts parents the world over… or does it? And what, if anything, has economics got to do with it? This week The Food Chain takes a global look at 'fussy eating', and finds out about different cultural expectations and solutions. Emily Thomas talks to a psychologist, a sociologist and a behavioural geneticist to debate the phenomenon, and parents in Beijing, Nairobi, Kolkata and London share their tactics.

(Picture: Baby making a mess eating, Credit: Getty Images)

Apr 26 2018

26mins

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Rank #18: Gordon Ramsay: My Life in Five Dishes

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The Food Chain listens back to My Life in Five Dishes with chef and broadcaster Gordon Ramsay - originally broadcast in January 2018. Gordon is world-famous, but as he tells Emily Thomas, people no longer want to talk about his food. The celebrity has becomes known as much for his TV programmes displaying his fiery temper and explosive outbursts, as for his culinary skills. In this interview, the focus is firmly back on the food, as Gordon describes the five most unforgettable meals he’s ever eaten, and how they have shaped him as a chef – from his mother’s macaroni and cheese on a council estate in the West Midlands, to smuggled cheese soufflés at Le Gavroche.

Gordon's dishes are: Mum's Mac and Cheese with smoked bacon; soufflé Suissesse at Le Gavroche; braised pigs' trotters with cabbage at Casa Del Pescatore near Verona; rum baba at Le Louis XV; and his own chickpea curry.

(Photo: Gordon Ramsay. Credit: Robyn Beck/Getty Images)

Jul 26 2018

26mins

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Rank #19: When foods get famous

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Why do some fruits and vegetables achieve superstar status, appearing on T-shirts worn by celebrities, or in tattoos adorning some of the biggest names in music? Who is behind the rise of avocados and kale, and who benefits most from their A-list status - savvy farmers, slick marketeers or health campaigners?

Emily Thomas explores whether fruit and vegetables should play the fame game: Is putting a single food on a pedestal good for consumers, producers, or the planet? Jess Loyer, from the University of Adelaide, and Lauren Westmore, from London PR firm Third City explain the potential pitfalls. Xavier Equihua, CEO of the World Avocado Organization explains how he promotes the fruit across the globe. And a small-town T-shirt maker, Bo Muller-Moore, reveals how he may have contributed to the rise and rise of kale.

Plus, why is it so much easier to create a buzz around one vegetable than an entire food group? Anna Taylor from UK healthy eating think-tank The Food Foundation, describes her uphill battle against public attitudes and the enormous advertising budgets of Big Food.

(Photo: Avocado being photographed. Credit: BBC)

Feb 28 2019

26mins

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Rank #20: Down on the farm: Suicide, stress and farmers

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Farming has some of the highest suicide rates of any profession in many parts of the world. Emily Thomas explores why depression and stress amongst farmers is a global problem that is thought to be on the rise.

It can be an incredibly tough business and many farmers struggle to make ends meet. But aside from financial pressures, are there other aspects of agricultural work and life that could contribute to mental illness?

Farmers in Australia explain why social and physical isolation, along with a culture of stoicism and strength, could be contributing to the problem, especially amongst men. And a specialist in farm succession in the US state of Oregon explains why family pressures and the tricky business of inheritance can cause enormous stress, and even lead people to take their own lives. Plus, we hear how social media and criticism of farmers over climate change and animal welfare might be adding to the problem.

But there are solutions - we hear how mindfulness, governments, and even farm animals themselves can be the key to escaping depression.

For advice and support on the issues raised in this programme, and details of help available where you live, visit www.befrienders.org

(Picture: A farmer looking out over his fields. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Sep 26 2019

27mins

Play