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Rank #32 in Food category

Arts
Food

The Food Chain

Updated about 23 hours ago

Rank #32 in Food category

Arts
Food
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The Food Chain examines the business, science and cultural significance of food, and what it takes to put food on your plate.

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The Food Chain examines the business, science and cultural significance of food, and what it takes to put food on your plate.

iTunes Ratings

178 Ratings
Average Ratings
145
20
3
9
1

Food chain

By jrcornett - May 14 2020
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This is an outstanding podcast. Insightful, timely and balanced.

Simon

By tootnwootn - Dec 28 2019
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Wonderful. I’m heading to Netflix next to enjoy her show. Writing and cooking, great combination !

iTunes Ratings

178 Ratings
Average Ratings
145
20
3
9
1

Food chain

By jrcornett - May 14 2020
Read more
This is an outstanding podcast. Insightful, timely and balanced.

Simon

By tootnwootn - Dec 28 2019
Read more
Wonderful. I’m heading to Netflix next to enjoy her show. Writing and cooking, great combination !
Cover image of The Food Chain

The Food Chain

Latest release on Oct 29, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 23 hours ago

Rank #1: The Hidden Cost of a Home-Cooked Meal

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Who does the cooking in your house? In many cultures the responsibility for preparing meals at home traditionally falls to women. But as more women join the global workforce, traditional household responsibilities are changing. What impact is that having have on our internal family dynamics?

As part of the BBC's 100 Women season, we hear about the social and economic costs of putting a meal on the family table, when the most expensive ingredient is time.

Four women from different continents explain the challenges they face trying to balance family life, work, and food. A working mother in Mumbai tells us why she won't give up her kitchen, and a stay at home mum in New York explains why her working husband does most of the cooking. Plus, we hear that in parts of rural Kenya women who cannot cook are far from marriage material.

(Picture: A woman prepares vegetables in a village in Bangladesh. Credit: Jewel Samad, Getty Images)

Dec 03 2016

26mins

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Rank #2: The Art of Fermentation

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For 20 years Sandor Katz has been fascinated by fermentation - the breaking down of food and drink by microbes. Through his books and workshops he has helped thousands of people begin to experiment with flavours, fruits, vegetables, spices... and microorganisms.

Dan Saladino travels to Sandor's forest home in rural Tennessee to meet Sandor, hear his story, and discover for himself the transformative potential of this culinary process.

Producer: Rich Ward

Aug 31 2017

26mins

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Rank #3: Going Off Cow's Milk?

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Emily Thomas asks whether we’re on a slow but steady path to abandoning our pervasive, long-standing, and arguably slightly peculiar habit of drinking milk from cows.
In many European countries and the US, alternative plant-based milks are growing in popularity, and cow's milk sales are declining. Is this just a blip in our millenia-old love affair with dairy, or a steady drip towards a cow's milk-free future?
Three guests debate the potential effects on global poverty, the environment and our health.
(Photo: Brown cow. Credit: Getty Images)

Sep 20 2018

26mins

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Rank #4: Gordon Ramsay: My Life in Five Dishes

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Chef Gordon Ramsay is world-famous but, he tells us, people no longer want to talk about his food. The celebrity has become known as much for his cookery programmes, his fiery temper and explosive outbursts, as for his culinary skills.

This week, the focus is back on the food, as Gordon speaks to Emily Thomas about the five most memorable meals he has ever had and how they have shaped him as a chef - from his mother’s macaroni and cheese on a council estate in the West Midlands, to smuggled cheese soufflés at Le Gavroche.

Gordon's dishes are: Mum's Mac and Cheese with smoked bacon; soufflé Suissesse at Le Gavroche; braised pigs' trotters with cabbage at Casa Del Pescatore near Verona; rum baba at Le Louis XV; and his own chickpea curry.

(Photo: Gordon Ramsay. Credit: Robyn Beck/Getty Images)

Jan 18 2018

26mins

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Rank #5: In Search of Lost Foods

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What happens to a food when people stop eating it? Most of the food we eat today comes from a handful of crops, but before we became a globalised society, our diet reflected a variety of plants, proteins and foods that were cultivated as local specialties. Now, as our diets become less diverse, these foods face a critical point in their existence. In this programme the BBC's Dan Saladino explores several stories of foods that are dying out and talks to the farmers and producers who are working to save them.

(Photo: Mexican Blue Corn Credit: Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images)

Nov 12 2016

26mins

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Rank #6: Not Just a Rich White Woman’s Problem

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Emily Thomas explores a stereotype with potentially life-threatening consequences - the idea that eating disorders are a problem that only affects white women in wealthy countries. She talks to black women in South Africa, Nigeria and the US who have had eating disorders. Their experiences and their cultural backgrounds are very different, but they all say the prevailing stereotype that eating disorders are a ‘white’ problem, makes it harder for black women to speak out and get the help they need. They also challenge the notion that these illnesses are caused by the pursuit of western beauty ideals.
(Picture: Young woman. Credit: Getty Images)

Oct 11 2018

26mins

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Rank #7: Should We All Be Vegans?

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What would happen if we all became vegans? Veganism – cutting out animal products from your diet, and often your wardrobe – suddenly seems more mainstream than ever. It is attracting followers from Beyoncé to Al Gore, and there’s a new breed of vegan, too: vloggers espousing their veggie-heavy lifestyle to millions of online fans. Whether it is for health, environmental or ethical reasons, more and more people are embracing plant-based food.

The BBC’s Mike Johnson sets out to explore what the world would look like if everyone gave up animal products tomorrow, and the economic consequences of a meat and dairy-free world. We talk to the owner of the first vegan café in Qatar, we test a meatless burger that ‘bleeds’ beetroot juice and we weigh up the human cost of an animal-free diet.

(Photo: A detail of a painting by Giuseppe Acrimboldo featuring a man's head made out of vegetables. Credit: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images)

Oct 15 2016

26mins

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Rank #8: What Will You Eat if the Apocalypse Comes?

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How long would your food supply last if you were unable to buy any food? Are you prepared for the worst is a hurricane hits, the floodwaters rise or the stock markets crash? Maybe your cupboards are full - but what if you had no electricity or gas to cook? Or if the water supply was turned off? And, if there was total breakdown of social order - could you defend the food you have?

This week we meet the people who are stockpiling food in anticipation of anything from an earthquake to the apocalypse. They call themselves 'preppers'.Do they know something you don’t? When society is falling apart, do taste or texture matter? And when does stockpiling food become hoarding?

The BBC’s Emily Thomas goes in search of some secret stockpiles to find the best post-apocalyptic food plans.

With contributors: Pete Stanford, Lincoln Miles, owner, Preppers Shop, Henry Hargreaves, Photographer, Lisa Bedford, The Survival Mom, and Kate Daigle, psychologist.

Aug 03 2017

27mins

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Rank #9: Chinatown

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Nearly every major city in the world has one- a district where Chinese immigrants have settled to live, work and eat. This week in a collaboration with BBC Radio 4’s ‘The Food Programme’, Dan Saladino takes you on a tour of Chinatowns around the world. From one of the oldest, in Manila, to one of the newest, in Johannesburg- Chinatowns create a global trail of economic and culinary influence. And the food that they serve reflects not only the tastes of home, but of the adopted countries. In this programme we ask how these urban communities reflect not only the history of Chinese immigration, but the changing role of China as a global power. Including visits to Havana, to look at the legacy of communism in a Chinatown that rarely serves Chinese food, and Shanghai, where the fortune cookie - a westernized version of Chinese cuisine is finding a new market at home.

Featuring:

Fuchsia Dunlop
Jennifer 8. Lee
Peter Kwong
Chan Chow Wah
Gerry Choo-ah
James Wong
With reporting from:

Vivienne Nunis
Celia Hatton and Maria Byrne
Victoria Phenethi
Will Grant

Photo: Gates of Chinatown, Credit: Thinkstock

Nov 21 2015

26mins

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Rank #10: Breast Practice

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As part of the BBC's 100 Women season, The Food Chain dedicates an episode to working mothers and how they feed their babies. More women are entering the global workforce, and many of them become mothers at a crucial point in their careers. But with the availability of parental leave as variable as there are countries in the world, many women must return to work while their child is still nursing. Meanwhile, the WHO says that a woman should exclusively breastfeed her child up to six months of age. So, how do you juggle the demands of feeding a baby with a working life? We'll hear about a project in Bangladesh that helps garment factory workers continue to breastfeed their babies, and we visit Indonesia where a taxi service exists to ferry breast milk from working mothers to waiting infants at home. And from Hong Kong to Ivory Coast, Manuela Saragosa reunites our panel of BBC correspondents - who are also working mothers - to discuss the challenges of reporting on their patch and pumping milk.

Image: Baby breastfeeding, Credit: Thinkstock
Featuring:

Dr. Larry Grummer-Strawn, World Health Organization
Phyllis Rippey, Professor of Sociology at the University of Ottawa
Micaela Collins, University of Toronto
Janet Golden, Professor of History at Rutgers University, New Jersey
Karishma Vaswani, BBC Asia Business Correspondent
Juliana Liu, BBC Hong Kong Correspondent
Tamasin Ford, BBC Ivory Coast Correspondent

Nov 28 2015

26mins

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Rank #11: Down with 'Foodies'?

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Is being cool a sign of culinary class? In the autumn of 2015 the Cereal Killer café in East London was attacked by protestors. They viewed it as a symbol of rapid gentrification - arguing that the cafe- which serves cereal from around the world- exemplified the rising inequality in the UK's capital. It led to some basic questions about running a food business. And the tensions between what’s trendy, what’s traditional and what’s affordable when it comes to eating out.

But a larger discussion, about conspicuous consumerism and the so- called ‘foodie movement’ looms. In this programme from London, Sarah Stolarz explores the intersections of city living, being upwardly mobile and the pursuit of the next best meal. We look at food trends and their irresistible appeal when it comes to social media- although it turns out, no one actually likes to be called a 'foodie'. Is access to new and varied food becoming more democratic, or are social media sites glossing over the surface of the culinary class wars? And what does that have to do with the price of pineapples?
Featuring:

Alan Keery: Co-Owner, Cereal Killer Café
Josėe Johnston: Author, 'Food, Democracy and Distinction in the Gourmet Foodscape'
Polly Russell: Curator at the British Library
@ClerkenwellBoyEc1
David Sax: Author of 'The Tastemakers: Why we're crazy for cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue'

Photo: multi-coloured macaroons, Credit: Thinkstock

Dec 12 2015

26mins

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Rank #12: Gordon Ramsay: My Life in Five Dishes

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The Food Chain listens back to My Life in Five Dishes with chef and broadcaster Gordon Ramsay - originally broadcast in January 2018. Gordon is world-famous, but as he tells Emily Thomas, people no longer want to talk about his food. The celebrity has becomes known as much for his TV programmes displaying his fiery temper and explosive outbursts, as for his culinary skills. In this interview, the focus is firmly back on the food, as Gordon describes the five most unforgettable meals he’s ever eaten, and how they have shaped him as a chef – from his mother’s macaroni and cheese on a council estate in the West Midlands, to smuggled cheese soufflés at Le Gavroche.
Gordon's dishes are: Mum's Mac and Cheese with smoked bacon; soufflé Suissesse at Le Gavroche; braised pigs' trotters with cabbage at Casa Del Pescatore near Verona; rum baba at Le Louis XV; and his own chickpea curry.
(Photo: Gordon Ramsay. Credit: Robyn Beck/Getty Images)

Jul 26 2018

26mins

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Rank #13: Taking the Buzz out of Coffee

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A former-coffee lover goes on the hunt for a decent cup without the buzz, and discovers why it's so hard to get flavour without a fix.

Emily Thomas delves into the complex art of caffeine extraction and discovers that taste is not the only challenge when it comes to taking the bounce out of a bean. The environmental and economic costs of decaf coffee soon add up, meaning a cup may carry a higher carbon footprint and be made with cheaper beans than the full-blooded stuff.

Could a caffeine free coffee plant hold all the answers? A botanist explains why finding a suitable candidate is an unpalatable challenge.

Or are we being over sensitive? A scientist explains why some of us react badly to caffeine, whereas others can fall into a slumber after two espressos.

(Photo: Cup of coffee with drop suspended above it. Credit: BBC)

Dec 13 2018

26mins

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Rank #14: Aristocrats and Archaeo-Food Nerds

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Have you ever felt the urge to share exactly the same culinary experience as your ancestors? Do you care what ancient Roman bread tasted like? Or what a 16th Century courtier smelt as he lifted a slice of roast beef to his mouth? Would you understand yourself, or today’s food system, better if you did?
And if the closest you come to experiencing the past is watching period dramas on television, are you bothered by whether the pigeon is actually chicken - or the fish, cream cheese? How real do we want the imaginary to be?
Emily Thomas asks what we can learn about the past and present from the painstaking reconstruction of old recipes. Four people who dedicate their lives to recreating historical dishes make their case: An archaeologist tirelessly trying to uncover the secrets of the bread of Pompeii in Italy; The food stylist on the film set of the globally popular period drama Downton Abbey; An historian earnestly roasting beef at a Tudor palace; and a Polish chef desperately trying to preserve traditions he fears are becoming lost.
(Photo: Woman in a baroque wig, Credit: Getty Images)

Oct 18 2018

26mins

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Rank #15: Baristas: The daily grind

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What is the person making your coffee secretly thinking about you? Which orders make their heart sink?

Emily Thomas is joined by three top baristas in Dublin, Brazil and India. They explain how making coffee was once seen as a low-wage, unskilled job in much of the world, but these days, it holds a certain cache. But what's driving the meteoric rise of the barista - and who ultimately is benefitting? Most still earn a very low wage - like many of the farmers producing the coffee - whilst big chains thrive.

(Photo: Barista Daniel Horbat makes a cup of coffee. Credit: Kristaps Selga/ World Coffee Events/ BBC)

Jul 25 2019

26mins

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Rank #16: Vegan Babies: Should You Restrict Your Child’s Diet?

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Are parents wrong to impose their own restrictive diets on their children? An Italian MP wants to jail parents who choose vegan or other “reckless” diets for their kids. But many of these families argue their children are healthy and happy. This week, we take a look at the implications of excluding certain foods from a child’s plate. Should children be encouraged to develop their own food choices regardless of their parents’ convictions? Vegan, veggie and Paleo parents talk to the BBC’s Manuela Saragosa.

(Photo: A child contemplates a plate of salad. Credit: Thinkstock)

Oct 22 2016

26mins

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Rank #17: Should You Drink Your Food?

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Why won't our brains let us feel full on liquid food? After all, we spent the first months of our lives living on milk alone.

We talk to a man who lived on liquid alone for 30 days, as we explore why adults are ditching the knife and fork in favour of meals in liquid form.

We visit a juice and smoothie café in London where a gourmet smoothie can cost as much as a hot roast dinner, and meet a woman who is only too happy to swap her meal for a drink.

Sociology and Food expert Anne Murcott, from SOAS, University of London, tells us this trend is all in the marketing, and Richard Mattes of Purdue University explains why our adult brains are not perfectly wired to detect calories in drink form - and takes us on a journey through our digestive system to help us understand how we process liquid food.

And a warning about a little known problem that could be hiding in your smoothie, from allergy expert Dr Isabel Skypala.

Plus, we talk to the companies making whole meals in a bottle. The CEO of German company Bertrand, Tobias Stöber shares the thinking behind his product. Professor Amy Bentley isn't convinced though. She's from the Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Public Health at New York University and tells the BBC's Emily Thomas why she doubts the nutritional value of these drinks.

(Image: A spilled glass of strawberry smoothies. Credit: Kondor 83/ Thinkstock)

Jan 21 2017

26mins

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Rank #18: José Andrés: My Life in Five Dishes

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Meet the Michelin-starred chef who, when he hears word of a natural disaster, jumps on a plane to get there, rolls up his sleeves, and mobilises thousands to feed the hungry. José Andrés is the winner of our 2018 Global Food Champion Award. He is a man with many strings to his bow: Michelin-starred chef, TV personality, educator, serial entrepreneur, author, but it is his humanitarian work and ability to mobilise others in times of need that really won our judges over, after being nominated by our listeners.
Emily Thomas talks to him about the dishes that have defined his life so far, how he managed to make 3.4 million meals for Puerto Ricans in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, the valuable lessons he learnt from stealing his mother’s béchamel out of the fridge, and why he thinks a humble cook stove has the answer to many of the world’s problems today.
(Picture: José Andrés cooking in Puerto Rico, Credit: Central World Kitchen)

Aug 15 2018

26mins

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Rank #19: Naturally Misleading?

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What is 'natural' food and is it better for us? We explore the language of food labelling. Does a product bearing the word 'natural' on its label make you more likely to buy it? Or, is describing food as 'natural' just a marketing trick? We hear from a cattle farmer in the US state of Vermont who stopped using growth hormones on his herd so that the meat can be sold as 'natural'. Consumer psychologist Kit Yarrow, professor emeritus at Goldengate University in the US, explains how companies market "natural" food to us.

Are some supermarkets misleading their consumers with the way they are presenting their food? Journalist Tom Levitt from The Guardian tells Manuela Saragosa why some packaging may not tell the whole story. And we hear how the mislabelling of food in China can provide rich pickings for professional label readers. With more and more products declaring their 'pure' origins, David Jago, director of Global Insight and Innovation at the market intelligence company Mintel, outlines the size of the market. Should the word 'natural' be more closely defined? We ask Daniel Fabricant, CEO of the Natural Products Association in the US and a former FDA official.

Also, Manuela asks whether a diet of completely unprocessed natural food could actually be healthier for our bodies. Nutritionist Dimple Thakrar from Fresh Nutrition tells us why some processing could add to a healthy diet. And lawyer Kun Hoe describes how some professional label readers in China can benefit from mistakes in packaging.

(Photo: Shoppers in China's Anhui province. Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Aug 27 2016

26mins

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Rank #20: How not to run a restaurant

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It’s a dream shared by many a food lover - a restaurant of their very own. A showcase for their skill and creativity. A passion that also pays the bills.

But are aspiring restaurateurs always aware of just how difficult the restaurant trade can be? Is food is the most dangerous passion to have when it comes to business?

Emily Thomas meets three cooks in Abuja, Toronto, and London, and hears how they poured heart, soul and bank balance into opening their own restaurants - before packing it all in. These stories show just how tough the business can be.

(Picture: Woman rests on chair. Credit: Getty Images/ BBC)

Jun 20 2019

30mins

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