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Half Hour of Heterodoxy

The latest from the HxA podcast features the best of Heterodox Academy's panels and conversations. Earlier episodes of the HxA podcast are part of the series "Half Hour of Heterodoxy," hosted by social psychologist and co-founder of HxA, Chris Martin. Martin talks civility, polarization, truth, ideology, and pedagogy with Jon Haidt, John McWhorter, Alice Dreger, Glenn Loury, Cristine Legare, and other fascinating guests. You can find all of our recorded panels, conversations, and interviews at https://heterodoxacademy.org/

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Michael Kruse, Being a Journalist in a Social Media World

Michael Kruse is a senior staff writer at POLITICO, where he writes about presidential candidates and campaigns. He has been a journalist since his undergraduate years at Davidson College, and worked for the Tampa Bay Times before joining POLITICO. He has won a number of awards including the National Press Foundation’s Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Out There: The Wildest Stories from Outside Magazine, and Next Wave: America’s New Generation of Great Literary Journalists. We’ll be talking about the supposedly post-truth world that we live in and what college students should know about the nature of journalism.

28 May 2020

Rank #1

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86. Adam Domby, The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

Adam Domby is my guest today. He’s a history professor at the College of Charleston and we’llbe talking about his research on the statue of Silent Sam at the University of North Carolina atChapel Hill. That statue commemorated a Confederate soldier and was erected at a main universityentrance in 1913. When Domby was a student at Chapel Hill in the early 2010s, he uncoveredthe dedication speech of the statue showing its connection to White supremacy. The statuewas pulled down by activists in 2018 and there has been an ongoing legal dispute over what todo with the statue. I’ll also be talking about Adam’s new book The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory published in February this year, which is partially about thelies told by the people who sponsored this statue but mainly about lies told about NorthCarolina’s history after the Civil War and the function of those lies. You can follow Adam on twitter @AdamHDomby.

20 May 2020

Rank #2

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77. James Poniewozik, Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America

James Poniewozik is my guest today. He’s the chief television critic for the New York Times. We’ll be talking about his new book “Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America,” which was listed as one of the 10 best books of the year by Publishers Weekly, one of the 50 notable works of nonfiction in 2019 by The Washington Post, and a notable book of the year by the New York Times Book Review. One critic called it “two books in one” because half the book examines the history of television from the Reagan era to today, and the other half illustrates how Donald Trump assiduously used television to create his persona. As Poniewozik puts it, Trump is “a character that wrote itself, a brand mascot that jumped of the cereal box and entered the world, a simulacrum that replaced the thing it represented.”Audience of One combines both humor and serious analysis to explain how new forms of television programming–reality TV in particular–have changed the world we live in.  A transcript will be released soon.Related Links:* James Poniewozik's Columns at The New York Times* James Poniewozik on Twitter* Carlos Lozada's Review of "Audience of One," Washington Post* The Bulwark podcast: Episode with James Poniewozik, hosted by Charlie Sykes* An Evening with James Poniewozik, Sacramento Press Club and California State Library* An Evening with James Poniewozik, Midtown Scholar Bookstore, Harrisburg, PA. * Baby Yoda is Your God Now by James Poniewozik* Review: 'Watchmen' is an audacious Rorschach test by James PoniewozikIf you enjoyed listening to the show, please leave us a review on iTunes:* Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

37mins

2 Jan 2020

Rank #3

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73. Ilana Redstone, Heterodox Sociology

Ilana Redstone (@irakresh) is my guest. She is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she teaches core sociology courses and a special course called Bigots and Snowflakes: Living in a World Where Everyone Else is Wrong. She is the founder of Diverse Perspectives Consulting, whose mission to improve communication to create a truly inclusive workplace culture. Her research has focused on legal permanent residents in the U.S. She also has written about problems within the discipline of sociology.She has been a faculty fellow at Heterodox Academy since 2017. She currently manages the HXSociology forum, part of the Heterodox Communities (HxCommunities) initiative. It aims to support and promote a sense of community among heterodox scholars within particular fields of study, particular geographic regions, and other specific academic communities.Here is a transcript of this episode.Related Links:* The silent crisis in the classroom by Ilana Redstone, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) Conference 2019* New sociology course allows for viewpoint diversity by Sarah O'Beiren, The Daily Illini* The dangers of defining deviancy up by Ilana Redstone, Quillette* Articles by Ilana Redstone on Heterodox Academy's blogIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

31mins

26 Nov 2019

Rank #4

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71. Robert Talisse, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place

Robert Talisse (@roberttalisse) is my guest on this episode. He's the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His central research area is democratic theory. In his latest book Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place (@OverdoingD), Robert argues that we spoil certain social goods if we spend too much time and effort in the arena of politics and elevate political allegiances above other commitments.If you're in the D.C. area, you can catch a book signing by Robert Talisse at Politics and Prose on Connecticut Ave on November 2nd at 3:30 in the afternoon. If you're in the New York area, you can catch him at Shakespeare and Company on November 7 at 6:30 p.m.Here is a transcript of this episode.If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

47mins

1 Nov 2019

Rank #5

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69. Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations for Faculty and Students, Part 1

Sheila Heen is my guest today. She’s the coauthor of Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (1999), a New York Times Business Bestseller that has continuously been in print. An updated 10th anniversary edition was published in 2010. She’s also the coauthor of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off-Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood), a New York Times bestseller. She is a lecturer at Harvard Law School and a founder of Triad Consulting Group.We discuss difficult conversations between faculty and students in this episode, the first of two episodes with Sheila Heen. We recorded this using Skype because of technical problems with the application that we normally use. You may notice lower audio quality.Here is a transcript of this episode.Rating the ShowIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes:* Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

30mins

18 Oct 2019

Rank #6

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75. Carol Quillen, Leading a Liberal Arts College

Carol Quillen is my guest on this episode. She’s thepresident of Davidson College, my alma mater, and she is also a historian bytraining. She received her PhD in history from Princeton University. In 2018,Princeton awarded her the James Madison Medal, given in recognition of adistinguished career. She has published essays and talked about the usefulnessof debate and free expression in academia, and has also commented on the limitsof free expression. Related Links:* Carol Quillen on Twitter* Carol Quillen Biography * Fostering Democratic Values on Campus, a panel discussion with Carol Quillen, Ron Daniels, Wayne Frederick, and John Donvan* Reframing the Free Speech versus Inclusivity Debate by Carol Quillen, The Davidsonian* Time for a Detox: How the Sugar High of Certainty Impairs Speaking about Speech by Carol Quillen, Forbes* Buckle Up, It’s College by Carol Quillen, Forbes* Talk by Carol Quillen at the Community Building Initiative in Charlotte* Is Ethical Public Service Still Possible?, talk by William Kristol followed by panel discussion andd Q&A with Carol Quillen, sociology professor Natalie Delia Deckard, philosophy professor Daniel Layman, Davidson College event* 2020 - It Only Gets Worse From Here: Mike Allen & Vann Professor of Ethics and Society Bill Kristol, Davidson College eventHere is a transcript of this episode. If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

32mins

12 Dec 2019

Rank #7

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76. Deb Mashek, Heterodox Academy in 2020

Deb Mashek, my guest on this episode, is the executive director of Heterodox Academy. We talk about what Heterodox Academy does and Deb gives a preview of some 2020 events. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links:* The Staff of Heterodox Academy* The Advisory Council of Heterodox Academy* HxCommunities* Donate to HxA* Glenn Loury on Half Hour of Heterodoxy* Alice Dreger on Half Hour of Heterodoxy* Rick Shweder on Half Hour of HeterodoxyIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

26mins

18 Dec 2019

Rank #8

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Episode 18: Jennifer Earl, Internet Activism and Fake News

Show Notes Jennifer Earl is professor of sociology and a professor of government and public policy at the university of Arizona. Her research focuses on Internet and social movements, social movement repression, and the sociology of law. She is the 2017 winner of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award, awarded by the communication, information technologies, and media sociology section of the American Sociological Association.I invited her to the podcast to talk about the use of the internet by political activists. When I say Internet, I don’t just mean social media. Social media gets a lot of attention, especially when people talk about polarization, but the internet is more than just Twitter and Facebook, and I think people sometime misunderstand how the internet is being used by political activists. I also wanted to talk to her about how the internet can be used to deceive people, and how people can become discerning consumers of web content.Selected QuotesOne should treat information on the Web with more criticism than we often treat it. So I think a practice that I try to use is that if I read something that I’m surprised about, many people will then try to Google a confirmation of that. So they’ll read “X happened,” and then they’ll google “Did X Happen?” Or they’ll just google “X” and see what comes up. But I would recommend that you try you consider falsification too, just like in social science so that you also try to search for negative evidence like this didn’t happen. So you might Google “X isn’t true” or “X is a myth.” Now certainly sometimes that’s going to get you to places where… Well, probably X was true. So, one of the things about holocaust denial is that holocaust denial plays on that kind of format of question (”X is a myth”) to bring people into holocaust denial websites. So I’m not saying that you should trust falsification on the web 100 percent of the time either, but I think you should have a healthy skepticism about what you read even if it’s sent to you by someone you trust because you don’t know their vetting procedure.TranscriptThis transcription was done by a professional but it may contain a few errors. Please listen to the podcast episode before quoting this transcript.Transcript Chris Martin: My guess today is Jennifer Earl and she’s a professor of sociology and a professor of government and public policy at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on internet and social movements, social movement repression and the sociology of law. And she’s the 2017 winner of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award, which is awarded by Communication, Information Technologies and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association. I invited her to the podcast to talk about the use of the internet by political activists. And when I say internet, I don’t just mean social media. Social media gets a lot of attention especially when people are talking about polarization, but the internet is much broader than that. And I think sometimes people misunderstand based on the writings of some popular authors how the internet is actually being used.I also wanted to talk to her about how the internet can be used to deceive people and how people can become more discerning users of web content. So here is Jennifer Earl.Welcome to the show.Jennifer Earl: Thanks so much for having me. I really appreciate it.Chris Martin: I wanted to start by talking about your 2011 book, Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age. You co-authored that with Katrina Kimport. Can you tell us a little bit about that book?Jennifer Earl: Certainly.

17mins

21 Jan 2018

Rank #9

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82. Katie Gordon, How to Effectively Help Students During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Katie Gordon is my guest today. Katie previously appeared on Episode 50: Can Offensive Political Speech Cause Trauma? On today’s episode, we’ll be talking about ways you can counsel and help students during the Coronavirus pandemic. We talk about what you can and cannot do, given legal and ethical guidelines around psychotherapy. We’ll also discuss resources that you and your students can use and explain what classroom practices might be most effective during the pandemic. Even though this episode is primarily for professors, it could be useful regardless of your current role.A transcript of this episode will be released shortly.Related Links* FACE COVID: How to respond effectively to the Corona crisis by Dr Russ Harris* ACT Companion: The Happiness Trap App – Apple version and Google version (free with code TOGETHER)* How to Cope When the World is Canceled: 6 Critical Skills from Dr. Ali Mattu's The Psych Show* Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David D. Burns (discussed in this episode)* How Can Professors help students with mental health concerns (March 2018) by Katie Gordon and Brandon Saxton (2018)* Jedi Counsel—Episode 86: College Mental Health (March 2018) with Katie Gordon and Brandon Saxton* Online Mental Health Resources (from Katie Gordon’s website)Rating the ShowIf you enjoyed this show,please rate it on iTunes:* Go to the show's iTunespage and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to theright of "Details"* Next to "Click to Rate" select thestars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

23mins

23 Mar 2020

Rank #10

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84. Christian Gonzalez and Ian Storey, The Elusive Definitions of Conservatism and Liberalism

This is a special one-hour episode featuring Christian Gonzalez and Ian Storey.Christian Gonzales is a research assistant at Heterodox Academy. He’s a senior at Columbia University and he has written for various conservative publications like National Review and City Journal. Ian Storey is a staff writer for Heterodox Academy. He’s a political scientist and a candidate for Masters of Divinity at Union Theological Seminary. Christian classifies himself as a conservative; Ian classifies himself as a liberal.In this episode we’ll explore whether it’s possible to define conservatism and liberalism.Here is a transcript of this episode.Related LinksLooking through an ideological lens at Columbia University by Christian Gonzalezhttps://heterodoxacademy.org/looking-through-an-ideological-lens-at-columbia-university/How Critics of Intersectionality (Often) Miss the Point by Ian Storeyhttps://heterodoxacademy.org/how-critics-of-intersectionality-often-miss-the-point/Rating the ShowIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes” Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details” Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxyhttps://heterodoxacademy.org/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/

27 Apr 2020

Rank #11

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70. Sheila Heen: Difficult Conversations, Part 2

Sheila Heen is my guest today. This is the second part of a two-part interview with her. The first part is available here. Sheila is the coauthor of Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (1999), a New York Times Business Bestseller that has continuously been in print. An updated 10th anniversary edition was published in 2010. She’s also the coauthor of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Arts of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off-Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood), a New York Times bestseller. She is a lecturer at Harvard Law School and a founder of Triad Consulting Group. Here is a transcript of this episode.If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

34mins

23 Oct 2019

Rank #12

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83. Cory Clark, Tribalism in War and Peace (And in the Social Sciences)

Cory Clark is my guest on this episode. She’s the Director of Academic Engagement at Heterodox Academy. She’s also a social psychologist and until recently was an assistant professor at Durham University in the UK. We’ll be talking about a paper by her and Bo Winegard that was published in Psychological Inquiry this year called “Tribalism in war and peace: The nature and evolution of ideological epistemology and its significance for modern social science”.

9 Apr 2020

Rank #13

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68. Matthew H. Goldberg, From Christian Identity to Climate Action

Matthew H. Goldberg (@MattGoldberg100) is my guest on this episode. He's a Postdoctoral Associate at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. He's an expert in social psychological topics related to communication, such as attitudes and persuasion, motivated reasoning, and ideology. We discuss Matt's recent paper A Social Identity Approach to Engaging Christians in the Issue of Climate Change, published this month in Science Communication. We also talk about related work at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, where Matt works. Matt talked about Katherine Hayhoe, an Evangelical Christian and climate activist, during the episode. Here is a short biographical video on Katherine Hayhoe from NOVA's Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers series. Her YouTube channel is Global Weirding with Katherine Hayhoe.Here is a transcript of this episode.Related Links:* Open Science Framework: Persuasive Climate Change Messages to Christian (data from the studies we discussed)* Yale Climate Opinion: Visualizations and Data* Matthew Goldberg on Google Scholar* A Social Identity Approach to Engaging Christians in the Issue of Climate Change by Matthew H. Goldberg, Abel Gustafson, et al.* Discussing Global Warming Leads to Greater Acceptance of Climate Science by Matthew H. Goldberg, Sander van der Linden, et al.* Perceived Social Consensus Can Reduce Ideological Biases on Climate Change by Matthew H. Goldberg, Sander van der Linden, et al.Rating the ShowIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes:* Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

32mins

1 Oct 2019

Rank #14

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78. Lawrence Glickman, Free Enterprise: An American History

Lawrence B. Glickman is my guest on this episode.  He’s the Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor in American Studies at Cornell University. We’ll be talking about his latest book, “Free Enterprise: An American History.” It covers what American politicians and the public mean when they talk about free enterprise, how that meaning has changed from the 19th century to the present, and whether the term “free enterprise” has a precise meaning.Nelson Lichtenstein, another historian of ideas, wrote this about Glickman’s new book, “In this sweeping intellectual and cultural history, Lawrence Glickman proves a sure guide to the economically vague yet politically talismanic meaning of the phrase ‘free enterprise.’ He demonstrates that the most enduring features of American business conservatism have long expressed themselves through this maddingly mythic construction.”Lawrence Glickman has also published historical books about the living wage and consumer activism. He teaches a popular course called “Sports and Politics and American History” at Cornell University.Here is a transcript of this episode.Related Links:* A Living Wage: American Workers and the Making of Consumer Society by Law* Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America by Lawrence B. Glickman* Just a Lot of Woids: A book review of "Free Enterprise" by Eric Rauchway, Reviews in American History

36mins

21 Jan 2020

Rank #15

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80. Eric Kaufmann, Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities

Eric Kaufmann, professor of politics at Birkbeck College, University of London, explains how white identity is threatened by immigration and how this trend drives polarization in English-speaking nations.

33mins

27 Feb 2020

Rank #16

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79. Jill DeTemple, A Structure for Difficult Classroom DIalogue

Jill DeTemple is my guest today. She’s an associate professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University. She uses a technique called reflective structured dialogue to enable students to express their perspectives on contentious moral and religious issues.

33mins

4 Feb 2020

Rank #17

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Cristine Legare on Teaching Techniques: Half Hour of Heterodoxy #16

Show Notes Cristine Legare is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin and she’s on the executive board of Heterodox Academy. She is the winner of the APS Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. In this episode, I talk to her about two teaching issues: how to teach a politically and religiously diverse student body, and how to approach controversial issues. You can learn more about Cristine Legare at www.cristinelegare.com.Selected Quotes“There are a lot of different things I would recommend. One is to set the stage within a class to accommodate lots of different perspectives. A student should have exposure to a great variety of different perspectives. And often students aren’t aware that there are many, many different ways to view or reason about a particular topic. So I think the first step is educating students that there are, in fact, lots of different ways of approaching a topic—that there are a lot of different opinions about topics and different values concerning topics. I think setting that stage is very important.”Previous Episodes of Half Hour of HeterodoxyMusic: "Ave Marimba" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

35mins

13 Nov 2017

Rank #18

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81. Amy Westervelt, How Does the Energy Industry Influence Universities?

Amy Westervelt contributes to the Guardian, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. In 2015, she received a Rachel Carson award and, in 2016, an Edward R. Murrow award for her environmental journalism. She’s the creator and host of the podcast Drilled, the first true-crime style podcast about climate change

34mins

10 Mar 2020

Rank #19

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74, Phoebe Maltz Bovy, How Useful is Privilege Checking?

Phoebe Maltz Bovy (@tweetertation) is my guest today. She’s the author of The Perils of "Privilege": Why Injustice Can’t be Solved by Accusing Others of Advantage, published in 2017. Her essays on privilege and politics have appeared in The New Republic, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and other publications. She also co-hosts the heterodox show Feminine Chaos with Kat Rosenfeld, available in streaming video on bloggingheads tv and as a podcast. We’ll be talking about her book and some of her more recent articles on privilege.Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links:* Phoebe Maltz Bovy on Twitter* Perils of Privilege excerpt in The New Republic* Feminine Chaos, a bloggingheads.tv show on heterodox feminism with Phoebe Maltz Bovy and Kat Rosenfeld. (You can also donate to the show on Patreon.)* The last thing on ‘privilege’ you’ll ever need to read by Carlos Lozada, book review in The Washington Post* Sympathy for the White Devil: Phoebe Maltz Bovy’s ‘The Perils of Privilege’ by Jacqui Shine, LA Review of Books* Liberals need to stop to stop obsessing over privilege or they’ll never accomplish anything by Phoebe Maltz Bovy, Quartz * White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack by Peggy McIntoshIf you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars.See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

33mins

5 Dec 2019

Rank #20