Cover image of Injury Prevention podcast
Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science

Injury Prevention podcast

Updated 11 days ago

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
Read more

Injury Prevention is an international peer review journal, offering the best in science, policy and public health practice to reduce the burden of injury in all age groups around the world. In our podcast we interview the author of that edition’s editor’s choice article.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Read more

Injury Prevention is an international peer review journal, offering the best in science, policy and public health practice to reduce the burden of injury in all age groups around the world. In our podcast we interview the author of that edition’s editor’s choice article.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Cover image of Injury Prevention podcast

Injury Prevention podcast

Latest release on May 06, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 11 days ago

Rank #1: Mark Stevenson on mobile phones, big data and a new era in Injury Prevention

Podcast cover
Read more
Mark Stevenson (University of Melbourne, Australia) is one of the State of the Art Review Editors of Injury Prevention. He talks with Rod McClure about a new era in the practice of Injury Prevention supported by technology and big data, both powerful allies in his most recent work.
More details of the papers mentioned in this podcast:
- The epidemiology of accidents. American Journal of Public Health. 1949, 39(4):504-515
- The role of sleepiness, sleep disorders, and the work environment on heavy-vehicle crashes in 2 Australian states. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2014, 179(5):594-601.
- Childhood drowning: barriers surrounding private swimming pools. Pediatrics, 2003, 111: e115-e119.
- Land use, transport and population health; estimating the health benefits of compact cities. Lancet, 2016; published online Sept 23.

- The role of mobile phones in motor vehicle crashes resulting in hospital attendance: a case-crossover study. British Medical Journal, 2005, 331:428-433. - https://www.bmj.com/content/331/7514/428

May 23 2019

15mins

Play

Rank #2: The Sports Injury Registry

Podcast cover
Read more
This podcast focuses on the collection of high school athlete sports injury data by the University of South Florida Sports Medicine and Athletic Related Trauma Institute (SMART).

SMART developed an injury surveillance tool to collect detailed sports injury risk factor and outcome data for high school athletes in west central Florida beginning in 2007. Since 2012 SMART has joined the Reporting Information Online (RIO) network for high school athletes’ sports injury data collection. The lead researcher for the SMART injury surveillance research is Dr Karen Liller, Professor and AAAS Fellow in the University of South Florida College of Public Health. The Director of SMART is Dr Barbara Morris.

Together they provide information on the origins of SMART, the data collection process, latest results, and plans for the future in this podcast.

About the presenters: Dr. Karen Liller is a professor and AAAS Fellow in the University of South Florida College of Public Health. Her teaching, research, and service activities largely focus on public health and the prevention and control of children's unintentional injuries, most recently those related to sports. In 2012 Dr Liller was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and has been named one of the top 15 women scholars in health education and health promotion. She is the editor of the injury text, "Injury Prevention for Children and Adolescents: Research, Practice, and Advocacy," published by the American Public Health Association.

Dr Barbara Morris, Director of SMART, is also a certified athletic trainer and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. She was named the 2008 Professional Outreach Athletic Trainer of the Year by the Athletic Trainer’s Association of Florida and has worked extensively in sports medicine clinical settings, including athletic training outreach, industrial rehabilitation and administration. Dr Morris has a faculty appointment in USF’s Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine where she teaches in the Athletic Training Education Program.

Aug 21 2014

27mins

Play

Rank #3: Greening vacant lots reduces violent injury

Podcast cover
Read more

In Philadelphia, the local authority has undertaken a project to green vacant lots, with the aim of improving the city.

Research by Charles Branas, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania, has shown that not only did this have the desired aesthetic effect, it also lead to a reduction in violent crime in those areas.

He joins Brian Johnston, IP's editor in chief, to discuss his work.

Read the full research: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/19/3/198

Jul 12 2013

22mins

Play

Rank #4: Safe spaces for children to be active

Podcast cover
Read more
In this podcast, Professor Brent Hagel, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, tells Editor-in-Chief of Injury Prevention, Rod McLure, how his career as a scientist moved from an undergraduate degree in health education through to injury prevention in sports and more recently to methods of encouraging physical activity within a safe environment. The conversation evolves to a detailed discussion of the rigorous methodological approaches used in injury prevention.
The articles mentioned in this podcast are:
- Hagel BE, Meeuwisse WH, Mohtadi NG, Fick GH.Skiing and snowboarding injuries in the children and adolescents of Southern Alberta.Clin J Sport Med. 1999 Jan;9(1):9-17;
- Thompson DC, Rivara FP, Thompson RS.Effectiveness of bicycle safety helmets in preventing head injuries. A case-control study.JAMA. 1996 Dec 25;276(24):1968-73;
- Roberts I, Marshall R, Lee-Joe T. The urban traffic environment and the risk of child pedestrian injury: a case-crossover approach. Epidemiology. 1995 Mar;6(2):169-71;

- Runyan CW. Using the Haddon matrix: introducing the third dimension. Inj Prev. 1998 Dec;4(4):302-7 (https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/4/4/302).

Jul 30 2019

20mins

Play

Rank #5: Using the Haddon matrix: introducing the third dimension

Podcast cover
Read more
William Haddon Jr developed his conceptual model, the Haddon matrix, by applying basic principles of public health to the problem of traffic safety. In 1998, Carol Runyan expanded on his work with the seminal paper “Using the Haddon matrix: introducing the third dimension” that expanded on the matrix and its utility by adding a decision-making dimension based on principles of policy analysis. This paper made an important contribution to the injury prevention field as it provided straightforward and useful guidance on how to apply and use an already familiar tool to better support evidence-based decision-making.

In this podcast, Dr Runyan, UNC Injury Prevention Research Center, and J Morag MacKay, European Child Safety Alliance discuss the impact of the work and, given the current challenges decision makers face in translating research into action, how this framework remains relevant today.

Read the papers:
Using the Haddon matrix: introducing the third dimension http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/21/2/126.full

Research and practice in a multidimensional world: a commentary on the contribution of the third dimension of the Haddon matrix to injury prevention http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/21/2/131.full

Jul 23 2015

24mins

Play

Rank #6: Firearms injury as a public health problem in the US: origins and challenges

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Deb Azrael tells the "origin story" of firearms injury as a public health problem through the lens of one of the key firearms research groups in the US over nearly 30 years. She also discusses current data of gun possession, suicide rates and the real challenges of this problem in the country.
Read the special issue of Injury Prevention on firearms: https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/25/5.

The editorial of the special issue is available here: https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/25/Suppl_1/i1.

Aug 28 2019

21mins

Play

Rank #7: Preventing deaths and injuries from house fires

Podcast cover
Read more
Brian Johnston, IP Editor in Chief, talks to Gregory Istre and Mary McCoy, Injury Prevention Center of Greater Dallas, about their latest research into the impact of community-based smoke alarm distribution programmes on the occurrence of house fire-related deaths and injuries.

Read the full research: http://goo.gl/mg7JCa

Mar 24 2014

16mins

Play

Rank #8: Injury and violence: achieving population level change

Podcast cover
Read more
In the first podcast of the year, Editor-in-Chief of Injury Prevention Rod McClure talks to Natalie Wilkins, from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Dr Wilkins experience in the injury prevention field ranges from opioids overuse to car accidents, sports injury, child abuse and suicide. She is the guest editor of a supplement of the Injury Prevention journal titled “Achieving population level change”, which brings together different approaches for achieving population-level change to improve injury-related health of communities. Read it for free: https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1.
A list of specific papers mentioned in this podcast below:
A social change perspective on injury prevention in China - https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/i25
What matters, when, for whom? three questions to guide population health scholarship -
https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/i3
New York City’s window guard policy: four decades of success - https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/i14
How the science of injury prevention contributes to advancing home fire safety in the USA: successes and opportunities - https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/i7
Compared with what? Estimating the effects of injury prevention policies using the synthetic control method - https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/24/Suppl_1/i60

Find the Injury Prevention podcast on the journal website (injuryprevention.bmj.com) as well as on your preferred App every first Thursday of the month.

Dec 20 2018

10mins

Play

Rank #9: Analysis of the quantity and quality of published RCTs related to injury prevention in China

Podcast cover
Read more

Brian Johnston talks to Guoqing Hu, Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Central South University, China, about what his analysis of injury prevention research published in China between 2001 and 2010 reveals.

Read the full paper (for free) http://goo.gl/bNZz51

Jul 03 2014

34mins

Play

Rank #10: Patterns of vulnerability to non-fatal injuries in Sudan

Podcast cover
Read more
Successful injury prevention requires identification and targeting of particularly vulnerable groups, but little is known about injury vulnerability patterns in Sudan.

Safa Abdalla, Sudanese Public Health Consultancy Group, aimed to fill this gap using survey data, and here Brian Johnston asks her what she found.

Read the full paper:

http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/20/5/310.full

Nov 05 2014

13mins

Play

Rank #11: Abe Bergman, paediatrician with a lifetime in injury prevention… and many stories

Podcast cover
Read more
It started with a campaign for the bicycle helmet in children. It didn’t become a national priority, but helped to increase its usage from 2% to 70% in the last two decades in the USA. Dr. Abraham “Abe” Bergman has dedicated most of his long career as a pediatrician to the field of injury prevention. He helped found the Harborview Center and, at 87, he tells Editor-in-Chief of Injury Prevention Rod McClure some of his success stories, but also frustrations of the last 60 years.

Read the related blog post: https://blogs.bmj.com/injury-prevention/2019/10/03/personal-disappointments-in-injury-prevention-abe-bergman/

Oct 02 2019

19mins

Play

Rank #12: The health care burden of illicit synthetic drug use

Podcast cover
Read more
The Minnesota Department of Health conducted an exploratory epidemiologic investigation into the health care burden of illicit synthetic drug (ISD) use in Duluth, Minnesota.

Staff reviewed medical records of 78 patients with suspected ISD use who were treated in emergency departments at two Duluth-area hospitals from January through September 2013.

The analysis showed use of ISDs has the potential to create a significant burden on the health care system and public services, and that effective prevention and response strategies need to be developed.

In this podcast, study authors Mark Kinde, Unit Leader for the Injury and Violence Prevention Unit at the Minnesota Department of Health, Ruth Lynfield, State Epidemiologist and Medical Director for the Minnesota Department of Health, and Sarah Dugan, Research Analyst, Injury and Violence Prevention Unit, Minnesota Department of Health, discuss the work and its findings.

Read the full paper here:

http://www.minnesotamedicine.com/Portals/mnmed/February%202014/Clinical_Dugan_0214.pdf

Nov 05 2014

20mins

Play

Rank #13: Violence and Injury Research - why does it matter?

Podcast cover
Read more
The focus of the podcast this month is the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR). Editor-in-Chief Rod McClure chats to the President of the SAVIR, Dr Linda Degutis, about the work of the society and the role of the journal of Injury Prevention on the work of preventing and treating injury and violence.
https://www.savirweb.org/

https://injuryprevention.bmj.com/

Dec 04 2019

11mins

Play

Rank #14: Looking back at building the evidence base for safe and active bicycling

Podcast cover
Read more
As Injury Prevention turns 20 we're taking a look back at some of the most influential papers we've published in our Anniversary Archives, starting with Fred Rivara et al's “Epidemiology of bicycle injuries and risk factors for serious injury”.

Using data from their seminal case–control study on bicycle helmet effectiveness, the study reported on crash circumstances, helmet use and injury outcomes to identify prevention opportunities. This study was part of a broader intellectual effort to engage rigorous epidemiological science in the gritty real-world work of injury prevention: identifying modifiable crash risk factors, measuring helmet effectiveness and putting this knowledge to work in a large controlled community campaign.

Here Brian Johnston talks to Fred Rivara, Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, and commentators Beth Ebel, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, and Brent Hagel, Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary.

Read the papers:
Epidemiology of bicycle injuries and risk factors for serious injury http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/21/1/47.full

Building the evidence base for safe and active bicycling: an historical commentary on Rivara et al: epidemiology of bicycle injuries and risk factors for serious injury

http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/21/1/52.full

Feb 06 2015

15mins

Play

Rank #15: Spatial analysis of paediatric swimming pool submersions by housing type

Podcast cover
Read more
Drowning is a major cause of unintentional childhood death. Along with colleagues, Rohit P Shenoi, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Texas, investigated the relationship between childhood swimming pool submersions, neighbourhood sociodemographics, housing type and swimming pool location was examined in Harris County, Texas.

He tells Brian Johnston what they found.

Read the paper, for free: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/21/4/245.full

Sep 09 2015

15mins

Play

Rank #16: Road safety and communication. Why Professor Martha Híjar chose research over public service

Podcast cover
Read more
Professor Martha Híjar has recently made the decision of leaving her role as the Director of the National Council for Injury Prevention of the Ministry of Health in México to go back to research. She explains why in this conversation with Professor Rod McClure. She is a professor at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México and author and co-author of many articles in the Injury Prevention field, the majority of which are written in Spanish, so "they can reach all her colleagues in Latin America” she tells. Professor Híjar also talks about taking on the job of editing Injury Prevention and explores her Mexico-city-based career path in this field.
References to the mentioned papers below:
- Baker SP. Childhood Injuries: The Community Approach to Prevention. J Public Health Policy 2:235-246, 1981.
https://www.jstor.org/stable/3342369
- Híjar MC, Carrillo C, Flores M, Anaya R, Lopez MV. Factores de riesgo de lesión por accidentes de tráfico y el impacto de una intervención en carretera. (Risk factors for road traffic injuries on highway, impact of an intervention on the road) Rev Saúde Pública de Brasil.1999, 33 (5):505-51.
https://www.scielosp.org/pdf/rsp/1999.v33n5/505-512/es
- Híjar M, Troste J, Bronfman M. Pedestrian injuries in México: a multi-method approach. Social Science & Medicine 2003, 57(11):2149-2159.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0277953603000674

Apr 01 2019

24mins

Play

Rank #17: A vision of safer cities

Podcast cover
Read more
Technology is bringing both challenges and new solutions to the injury prevention science. Professor Richard Franklin, Co-Director of the World Safety Organisation Collaborating Centre for Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, James Cook University, Australia, has a positive view of the future of our cities, which will rely much more on active and safe transportation. He tells Editor-in-Chief of Injury Prevention Rod McClure about the evidence-based and public health approaches of his work, especially in rural populations.

They also discuss the upcoming Safety 2020 - the world conference taking place in Adelaide, Australia, which organising committee Professor Franklin is part of (https://www.worldsafety2020.com).

Nov 06 2019

12mins

Play

Rank #18: Poverty and children's burn injury. How common citizens help shape Injury Prevention in South Africa

Podcast cover
Read more
This month’s guest is a specialist in childhood burns and violence-related injuries in South Africa. Professor Ashley Van Niekerk is the deputy director of the Violence, Injury and Peace Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council-University of South Africa. He tells Editor-in-Chief of Injury Prevention, Professor Rod McClure, how the social changes of the 1990s and the current political and economic unrest in the country have been shaping his career in Injury Prevention.
Find the Injury Prevention podcast on the journal website (injuryprevention.bmj.com) as well as on your preferred App every first Thursday of the month.

The articles mentioned in this podcast are:
Van Niekerk, A., Govender, R., Hornsby, N., & Swart, L. (2017). Household and caregiver characteristics and behaviours as predictors of unsafe exposure of children to paraffin appliances. Burns, 43, 866-876.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2016.10.022

Van Niekerk, A., Tonsing, S., Seedat, M., Jacobs, R., Ratele, K. & McClure, R. (2015). The invisibility of men in South African violence prevention policy: National prioritisation, male vulnerability, and framing prevention. Global Health Action, 8: 27649.
https://doi.org/10.3402/gha.v8.27649

Lockhat R, Van Niekerk A. (2000). South African children and mental health: A history of adversity, violence and trauma. Ethnicity and Health, 5(3/4), 291-302.

https://doi.org/10.1080/713667462

Feb 05 2019

21mins

Play

Rank #19: Structural housing elements associated with home injuries in children

Podcast cover
Read more
In this podcast Dr Brian Johnston talks to Wendy Shields and Eileen McDonald co-authors of the paper "Structural housing elements associated with home injuries in children".

Full paper >>http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/22/2/105.full

May 18 2016

22mins

Play

Rank #20: Firearms injury. Professor David Studdert on mass shootings, health law and changing careers

Podcast cover
Read more
In the second podcast of a series about the papers that helped shape a career in Injury Prevention, Professor Rod McClure talks to Professor David Studdert, expert in health law and empirical legal research from the Stanford Law School and Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, whose latest research career focus on the burden of injuries and deaths from firearms, especially in the wake of mass shootings.
Find the Injury Prevention podcast on the journal website (injuryprevention.bmj.com) as well as on your preferred App every first Thursday of the month.
More about the papers mentioned in this podcast below:
(2017) “Handgun Acquisitions in California After Two Mass Shootings” -
https://law.stanford.edu/publications/handgun-acquisitions-in-california-after-two-mass-shootings/
(2010) "Relationship between vehicle emissions laws and incidence of suicide by motor vehicle exhaust gas in Australia, 2001-06: an ecological analysis" - https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1000210

(1991) "Incidence of Adverse Events and Negligence in Hospitalized Patients — Results of the Harvard Medical Practice Study I" - https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199102073240604.

Dec 05 2018

21mins

Play