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CodeWinds - Leading edge web developer news and training | javascript / React.js / Node.js / HTML5 / web development - Jeff Barczewski

Updated 10 days ago

Education
Technology
Training
Software How-To
Tech News
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Keep up with the latest web developer technologies and news covering javascript, React.js, Node.js, HTML5. Learn the current best practices in web and mobile app development.

Read more

Keep up with the latest web developer technologies and news covering javascript, React.js, Node.js, HTML5. Learn the current best practices in web and mobile app development.

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Great content

By Jon de la Motte - Feb 11 2014
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I just finished and loved the hapi review episode. The pace and technical depth are just what I was hoping for!

iTunes Ratings

2 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
1
0

Great content

By Jon de la Motte - Feb 11 2014
Read more
I just finished and loved the hapi review episode. The pace and technical depth are just what I was hoping for!
Cover image of CodeWinds - Leading edge web developer news and training | javascript / React.js / Node.js / HTML5 / web development - Jeff Barczewski

CodeWinds - Leading edge web developer news and training | javascript / React.js / Node.js / HTML5 / web development - Jeff Barczewski

Updated 10 days ago

Read more

Keep up with the latest web developer technologies and news covering javascript, React.js, Node.js, HTML5. Learn the current best practices in web and mobile app development.

Rank #1: 015 Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence explain that React.js really changes how we think about building web and mobile apps

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“It’s so rare that something actually comes along that really changes how we think about building stuff” - Michael Jackson

  1. Episode Info
  2. Show Notes and Timeline
  3. Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence React.js training
  4. Links and Resources
    1. Online Training Courses
    2. Training
    3. Mentioned in the episode
    4. Follow
  5. Related content
  6. Video

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 015
  • Published: April 8th, 2015
  • Tags: javascript, reactjs,nodejs,isomorphic
  • Duration: 1:16:34
  • Updated: 2015-04-11

Show Notes and Timeline

  • 2:40 - What’s special about React.js?

“For me personally, it changed the way that I code as much as jQuery did back in 2008.” - Michael Jackson

“OMG, This is really going to change the way that I work and how much I enjoy my job on a day to day basis.” - Michael Jackson

  • 5:00 - React.js doesn’t care about how you represent your data, models can be simple objects and arrays

“What excites me about React.js is… it doesn’t care about your data model, you just use plain JavaScript objects… For my models I use: array, Object, Number, …” - Ryan Florence

“The new paradigm with React.js is we aren’t observing, we aren’t having a bunch of events, we are just throwing data at functions and then they return descriptions of UI” - Ryan Florence

  • 6:40 - Javascript becomes our templating language

“It’s hard to explain until you start doing it how big of a shift this makes in your user interface development, to not worry about your app over time; you’re not mutating the state of objects over time in your UI components” - Ryan Florence

“We get to use the solutions that JavaScript already provides like modules and scope… we don’t have to wait for the framework’s template language to implement a solution for that” - Ryan Florence

  • 8:25 - React.js, Angular, and Ember are pushing the language forward (ES6)
  • 10:56 - Is React.js differnet from other SPA frameworks?
  • 11:30 - React.js could be a good rendering tool for many frameworks
  • 12:10 - Integrating React.js into existing code is easy without a full rewrite
  • 13:30 - React.js be added to mature apps, not just greenfield apps
  • 14:50 - Angular 2.0 and Ember 2.0 look a lot like and sound a lot like React.js. It is influencing so many other frameworks.
  • 15:30 - Who can use React.js? What types of projects?
  • 19:00 - Server side rendering - Isomorphic javascript
  • 22:30 - React.js doesn’t care where you render - client, server, canvas, etc.
  • 24:00 - Is React.js hard to learn?
  • 25:00 - React.js allows you to code yourself out of problems
  • 26:00 - Smaller API’s are easier to learn
  • 28:10 - What brought Michael and Ryan to using React.js?

For me, one of the most awkward parts about #Emberjs is switching back and forth between Handlebars templates and component code. Any ideas?

— Michael Jackson (@mjackson) May 13, 2014
  • 28:45 - Instructure had invested in Ember but were having struggles shipping and learning

“At Instructure, we bet on Ember… we were messing with it for almost a year and kind of weren’t shipping anything…” - Ryan Florence

  • 30:00 - After an hour of using React.js, Ryan wanted to use it everywhere

“After an hour of using React.js, I had my face in my hands and said… I want to use this everywhere” - Ryan Florence

  • 30:45 - A few hours later, Ryan had a router proof of concept up and running

“After two hours I actually had something working, and that probably impressed me the most about React.js” - Ryan Florence

“I was never able to just pick up something as quickly as I was able to pick up React.js and build a router” - Michael Jackson

“Two guys who had no idea what they were doing (with React.js) were able to make something (ReactRouter) that worked and was useful for other people” - Michael Jackson

  • 32:30 - Ryan started throwing his toughest problems at React.js and it handled them great

“Then I just threw all of my toughest problems that I had ever run into as a frontend developer at React.js” - Ryan Florence

  • 33:00 - Everyone at Instructure wanted to switch to React.js after being exposed to it

“At Instructure we had this hack week, I encouraged a couple of my coworkers to use React.js for their projects… every single one of them came back and asked: When are putting this into our stack?” - Ryan Florence

  • 33:20 - Reducing the context switch when developing, JSX
  • 37:26 - React Router and Relay, working with React.js team

“This is something that I really feel that the React.js authors have seriously nailed on the head, they’ll say they care about the community, and then they will show it by listening, participating, and working with us” - Michael Jackson

  • 40:00 - Data fetching improvements
  • 41:00 - Forward thinking attitude using ES6
  • 42:01 - Relay
  • 45:10 - Components
  • 48:00 - Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence’s React.js Training offerings
  • 50:10 - Become a React.js expert
  • 51:00 - React.js topics covered
  • 52:26 - Prerequisites for learning React.js, just javascript
  • 54:30 - Training format
  • 56:13 - React Router
  • 58:30 - JSX is an optional convenient way to write nested function calls
  • 1:00:00 - Getting designers involved with React.js

@ebryn @ryanflorence @mjackson At Stampsy, JSX enabled our designer to author, refactor and tweak components at crazy speed.

— Dan Abramov (@dan_abramov) September 28, 2014
  • 1:02:00 - Thinking in React.js by Pete Hunt
  • 1:03:38 - React Native
  • 1:05:00 - React Native as a game changer
  • 1:07:00 - Developers can work on native and web
  • 1:08:00 - React Native productivity of instant refreshing for new code
  • 1:10:20 - The wonderful and genuine React.js community

“I am just so impressed by the React.js community… everybody is helping and sharing, all trying to move our industry forward” - Jeff Barczewski

“The people I have found in the React.js community have been genuine. Their desire to help you understand is genuine. Their desire to learn is genuine. It’s been inspiring for me as well.” - Michael Jackson

  • 1:11:38 - Closing

Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence React.js training

Michael and Ryan have launched some React.js training starting this April. CodeWinds listeners can get a $300 discount to their San Francisco training this April 16-17, 2015. Use the link: http://codewinds.com/reactsf

Links and Resources

Online Training Courses

CodeWinds React.js Fundamentals

The premier online course and community where you learn React.js by pragmatically building a real web app while applying TDD/BDD principles

Training

  • http://codewinds.com/reactsf - $300 discount for Michael Jackson & Ryan Florence React.js training in San Francisco - April 16-17, 2015
  • https://reactjs-training.com/ - Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence training events - Seattle, San Francisco, Boulder, Boston, New York, Paris
  • http://codewinds.com/topics - Provide your input on topics, projects, difficulties, technology that you would like covered in future CodeWinds content (tutorials, podcasts, video training courses and classes).
  • Subscribe to the CodeWinds Leading Edge member list to be the first to hear about the upcoming CodeWinds React.js video training course and be invited to become charter members.

Mentioned in the episode

Follow

Related content

Video

Keynote on React.js and React Native from React.js Conf 2015

Apr 08 2015
1 hour 16 mins
Play

Rank #2: 014 Successful launch and I'm back, CodeWinds content plans for 2015, provide your input

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  1. Episode Info
  2. Transcript
    1. Summary
    2. Backstory
    3. Regrets
    4. I’m back and focussed on CodeWinds
    5. React.js and other course plans
    6. Provide your input
    7. Thanks for your support
    8. Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence React.js training discount
  3. Links

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 014
  • Published: April 6th, 2015
  • Tags: javascript, reactjs,nodejs
  • Duration: 8:55

Transcript

Summary

Today I will fill you in on the large project that I was working on, its launch, and my CodeWinds focus and content planning for the coming year.

The links and show notes for this podcast are available http://codewinds.com/14 as in episode 14.

Backstory

First, I want to start with an apology, I left you, my community, hanging without any explanation for too long. So I wanted to give you a little of the back story and update you on where CodeWinds is going.

When I launched CodeWinds in 2013, my goal was to bring you the latest web developer news and training which I would deliver through my blog, podcast, and video courses. Well just after I started working on content, a local enterprise reached out with an ultra important need to rapidly build a scalable resilient platform for a large client. I didn’t even know the specifics of their client until the launch a year later. Well this enterprise was MasterCard. Our client turned out to be none other than Apple, and we were building the MasterCard ApplePay system. Wow.

This was such an awesome opportunity to apply my knowledge and skills to such an important project. When I joined the team, I intended to continue delivering CodeWinds content in my spare time, however the project demanded more of my focus than I anticipated, especially as we approached the launch. We poured our hearts into making sure that our platform was battle ready. And what happened on launch day? … well everything just worked.

It was one of those priceless moments when everything comes together, like a symphony of technology and collaboration. The launch was described by some the senior staff as being possibly the most successful MasterCard launch of all time. It was complex, involving so many partners, yet it came together beautifully. I was blessed to be a part of this amazing team.

Regrets

Yet in all the success we had with this project, I failed you my CodeWinds community. I focussed so completely on the project that my content creation ground to a halt. I should have communicated with you, so you wouldn’t be left hanging and wondering what had happened. For that I am truly sorry, and ask for your forgiveness.

I’m back and focussed on CodeWinds

Fast forward to today, what’s in store for my future and that of CodeWinds. Well I am happy to say that I’m back. After much soul searching, I departed from the MasterCard team to work on CodeWinds fulltime. My desire is to bring you the best leading edge full stack web developer content.

React.js and other course plans

In the past few months, I have been doing a deep dive into React.js and its family. I’m so excited by the development and innovation going on in the React.js community.

“I believe the ideas and technology developing from the React.js community will profoundly influence how we build web and mobile apps.”

I’m currently planning a course on React.js and then will follow it with other topics like ES6, Hapi, Node, building resilient systems, and using HTML5.

I’ll offer this material in a variety of ways, but the primary mechanism will be online courses with training videos and exercises that you can follow at your own pace or in conjunction with those in a class. These will be real world projects similar to that which you would build at your companies.

I don’t like the simple hello world style examples which are so far removed from our real projects that it is hard to see how you really would do things in practice. So these will be real projects solving real problems including proper testing and error handling. I’ll deliver these video lessons in bite sized chunks that build on each other, so you can go directly to a specific topic or learn from beginning to end. I’ll continue to blog and produce this podcast with related materials to complement all of these areas.

Provide your input

To be successful in this endeavor, I really depend on your input for the technologies and training you would like me to cover, especially the key topics or questions that you struggle with when building complex web applications. I just want to make sure I am working on the most pertinent topics for you. So if you could just spare a few moments, I would really appreciate your input, head over to http://codewinds.com/topics which will redirect you to a Google Doc.

Check out the major categories, questions, topics, and provide your own. If you see existing ideas that resonate and interest you, please add a +1 next to them so I can gauge interest and priorities. If you have ideas for the types of apps we might build, please add that as well. I’m open to all your ideas and needs, just add them to the doc.

Thanks for your support

I want to thank you for staying with me through this prolonged start and I am excited about what we’ll be able to accomplish together in the future.

I hope you are subscribed to my leading edge member list because you won’t want to miss the next episode of the CodeWinds podcast on React.js with Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence. We had a fantastic discussion about React.js and I think you’ll start to see why I am excited about everything coming out of the React.js community.

Michael Jackson and Ryan Florence React.js training discount

Michael and Ryan have launched some React.js training starting this April and for CodeWinds listeners you can get a $300 discount to their San Francisco training this April 16-17, 2015. Use the link: http://codewinds.com/reactsf

The links and show notes for this episode are available at http://codewinds.com/14

If you would like to keep up on the latest in web developer news and training, follow me on codewinds.com where you’ll find this podcast, tutorials, and video training covering javascript, React.js, and Node.js.

Links

Apr 06 2015
8 mins
Play

Rank #3: 013 Reflections of JSConf 2014 - Part 2

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  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Links
    2. Videos

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 013
  • Published: September 22nd, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,jsconf
  • Duration: 42:54

Episode Notes

  • 01:42 - Nodevember Node.js and JavaScript Conference coming November 15-16, Nashville, TN
  • 04:40 - Day of Activities at JSConf 2014
  • 05:07 - NodeBots, NodeCopters, NodeRockets, NodeBoats
  • 11:43 - Golf Tournament sponsored by NodeSource
  • 13:04 - Kayaking, Scavenger Hunt, Segway tour of Amelia Island
  • 13:46 - Guy Bedford - Package Management for ES6 Modules (SystemJS, jspm.io)
  • 19:43 - Jordan Matthiesen - Modern mobile app tool-chains
  • 23:08 - Ryan Florence - Embularactymerbone
  • 27:30 - Forrest Norvell - Learning ES6 as a Community
  • 30:35 - Spike Brehm - Building Isomorphic Apps
  • 33:00 - Bodil Stokke - Reactive Game Development for the Discerning Hipster
  • 34:00 - Kassandra Perch - Modular Application Architecture in Javascript
  • 34:40 - Kawandeep Virdee - Open Web Art: JavaScript for Interactive, Collaborative, and Hackable Art
  • 36:24 - Brian Brennan - Being Human
  • 38:30 - JS Family pic via drone
  • 38:50 - Final thoughts about JSConf 2014

Links

Videos

Sep 22 2014
42 mins
Play

Rank #4: 012 Reflections of JSConf 2014 - Part 1

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  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Links
    2. Videos

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 012
  • Published: September 6th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,jsconf
  • Duration: 57:34

Episode Notes

  • 01:23 - Nodevember Node.js and JavaScript Conference coming November 15-16, Nashville, TN
  • 03:15 - JSConf 2014 Venue, Amelia Island, FL, Arriving
  • 09:00 - CSSConf, Welcome reception
  • 13:03 - Wednesday, first day of JSConf talks
  • 15:00 - Neil Green - custom DSL’s in JavaScript
  • 15:53 - Ron Evans, CylonJS - controlling hardware with JS, NodeBots, drones
  • 22:00 - Tessel - Hardware which runs JS
  • 24:45 - Spark Core kit
  • 26:30 - Travell Perkins - Battle Hardened Node.js for the Enterprise
  • 27:35 - Nico Bevacqua - Front End Ops Tooling, Grunt, Gulp, npm, browserify
  • 36:13 - Mark DiMarco - User Interface Alorithms
  • 40:25 - Nick Bray - Native Code on the Web
  • 41:15 - Ryan Paul - Composing frontend Web applications with MontagsJS
  • 45:45 - G. C. Marty - Play DVDs in JS for the sake of interoperability
  • 47:40 - James Long - Unshackling JavaScript with Macros, SweetJS, Implemnting some ES6 features with macros
  • 50:30 - Marco Rogers - Finding patterns across front-end frameworks
  • 53:00 - David Calhoun - Realtime satellite tracking in the browser
  • 54:10 - Jenn Schiffer - What’s the harm in sorting: sanitizing inputs for more optimized JavaScript

Links

Videos

Sep 06 2014
57 mins
Play

Rank #5: 011 Kassandra Perch - Modular JavaScript application architectures and insights from teaching

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  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Links
    2. Video / Slides

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 011
  • Published: August 20th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,jsconf
  • Duration: 11:37

Episode Notes

  • 04:08 - Being judicious about choosing frameworks
  • 05:10 - Frameworks which combine other components
  • 05:38 - Examples of modular frameworks
  • 06:21 - Insights from teaching at Girl Develop It!
  • 07:00 - Students learn in different ways
  • 08:10 - Format for classes, gradually building
  • 09:50 - Challenges in learning JavaScript

Links

Video / Slides

Watch Kassandra Perch’s JSConf talk on YouTube

Aug 20 2014
11 mins
Play

Rank #6: 010 Nico Bevacqua - JS build tooling, development workflow, and his new book JavaScript Application Design

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Nico Bevacqua, the author of JavaScript Application Design which is in early access at Manning, explains more about JS continuous development, integration, and deployment. We discuss build tools, module systems, component architectures, MVC, and finally the experience of writing a traditionally published book.

  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. JavaScript Application Design - Manning
    2. Links
    3. Video / Slides

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 010
  • Published: August 8th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,jsconf
  • Duration: 29:10

Episode Notes

  • 01:35 - Why build first?
  • 03:25 - Continuous development
  • 05:00 - Continuous Integration - Travis-CI
  • 05:20 - Continuous Deployment - Heroku, Amazon EC2
  • 06:20 - Build tools - grunt, gulp, npm - determining the best choice
  • 11:35 - JS Modules - AMD, CommonJS (CJS), ES6 Modules, RequireJS, Browserify, AngularJS DI
  • 15:00 - HTTP/2 efficient parallel streaming potentially reducing need for bundling
  • 16:30 - Browserify limitations and CommonJS
  • 18:30 - App design, modularity, package managers (component, bower, npm)
  • 20:20 - Current state of building components - Bower, Component, Polymer, Web Components, AngularJS, ReactJS
  • 22:24 - MVC Frameworks - AngularJS, ReactJS and the Virtual DOM
  • 23:35 - Experience writing JavaScript Application Design published by Manning
  • 27:35 - Following Nico

JavaScript Application Design - Manning

Published by Manning, currently available as early access edition - Purchase at Manning

Links

Video / Slides

Watch Nico Bevacqua’s JSConf talk on YouTube

Slides from Nico Bevacqua JSConf 2014: Front End Ops Tooling - Slideshare

Aug 08 2014
29 mins
Play

Rank #7: 009 Spike Brehm - Sharing javascript in browser and server - building isomorphic apps

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Spike explains the different categories of Isomorphic apps and how this is accomplished. He mentions various tools for facilitating sharing across browser, server, and devices. He shares how Airbnb, Yahoo, Flickr, Facebook, Instagram are using some of these technologies today. Finally, he provides resources to help others learn and get started.

  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Links
    2. Video / Slides

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 009
  • Published: July 16th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,jsconf
  • Duration: 13:48

Episode Notes

  • 01:50 - Isomorphic definition
  • 03:15 - Tools for sharing code across browser and server
  • 04:00 - Browserify for using Node.js packages in browser
  • 05:20 - Categories of Isomorphic code
  • 06:20 - Superagent - HTTP client
  • 07:08 - Airbnb’s Rendr - render Backbone apps on client and server
  • 07:30 - Compelling reasons for building isomorphic apps
  • 08:00 - Flickr main page isomorphic, modown project
  • 08:39 - Meteor framework
  • 09:25 - Getting started with Isomorphic JavaScript
  • 10:10 - ReactJS - client and server rendering, can attach event handlers to server rendered page
  • 10:40 - Facebook and Instagram using ReactJS for Isomorphic apps
  • 11:30 - Following Spike Brehm and Isomorphic JavaScript

Links

Video / Slides

Watch Spike Brehm’s JSConf talk on YouTube

Slides from Spike Brehm JSConf 2014: Building Isomorphic Apps - Slideshare

Jul 16 2014
13 mins
Play

Rank #8: 008 Guy Bedford - jspm & SystemJS - Unity and simplicity in loading CommonJS, AMD, and ES6 JS packages

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JavaScript module loading has traditionally been difficult due to diverse module formats and difficult configuration. With so many competing standards it is hard to get everything to work well together.

Guy has come forward with a solution which simplifies loading and management of JS packages. This is a full workflow solution including both dynamic loading and capability to build bundles for production.

  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Simple example of SystemJS in browser
    2. Links
    3. Videos
    4. Other podcasts

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 008
  • Published: July 2nd, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,es6,commonjs,amd,es6,packages,modules,jsconf
  • Duration: 22:12

Episode Notes

  • 03:00 - es6-module-loader
  • 04:25 - CommonJS, AMD, ES6 modules. Browserify
  • 05:10 - SystemJS - loads ES6 modules, AMD, CommonJS and global scripts. Designed in spec itself, IE8+, suitable for production, runs in browser and Node.js, promises API
  • 08:00 - SystemJS workflow - dynamic loading and build capability
  • 10:00 - Using SystemJS with build tools
  • 10:30 - SystemJS community
  • 11:30 - Auto file type detection (CJS, AMD, UMD, …) or can specify
  • 12:45 - Optional configuration. Made to be as easy as possible to get going
  • 14:30 - jspm - JavaScript Package Manager - CDN for SystemJS, require by name.
  • 15:30 - Core ideas - making requiring really simple and making package management really simple
  • 16:00 - Design of loader and manager
  • 17:28 - Ready for review and full workflow. An invitation to the community
  • 18:26 - GitHub locations for projects, examples
  • 20:34 - How to follow up, closing remarks

Simple example of SystemJS in browser

<script src="system.js"></<span class="hljs-name">script>
<script>
System.import('app/app')
.catch(function(e) {
// we add this since promises suppress all errors
setTimeout(function() {
throw e;
});
});
</<span class="hljs-name">script>

Links

  • es6-module-loader - ES6 module loader polyfill
  • SystemJS - Spec-compliant universal module loader - loads ES6 modules, AMD, CommonJS and global scripts.
  • SystemJS-Build-Tool - Build tool for SystemJS which can bundle for production
  • jspm - Package manager for the SystemJS universal module loader, built on top of the dynamic ES6 module loader. Load any module format (ES6, AMD, CommonJS and globals) directly from endpoints such as npm and github with flat versioned dependency management. For production, use the jspm CLI tool to download packages locally, lock down versions and build into a bundle. In development, load modules directly from CDN for frictionless experimentation, switching into production on the same code with a single configuration change. Supports SPDY with server push.
  • jspm-es6-demo - jspm ES6 module loading workflow demo - write ES6 modules, load external from CDN, install locally using CDN versions, bundle into single file for production
  • jspm Google Group - Discussion forum for JSPM
  • Guy Bedford’s Twitter
  • Guy Bedford’s GitHub repositories
  • Jeff Barczewski, Founder, CodeWinds twitter
  • CodeWinds twitter

Videos

Other podcasts

Jul 02 2014
22 mins
Play

Rank #9: 007 Forrest Norvell on ES6 and our community's role at JSConf 2014

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Watch video on YouTube

  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. Links
    2. Videos

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 007
  • Published: June 24th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, js,es6,jsconf
  • Duration: 38:33

Episode Notes

  • 01:36 - Forrest explains his new position at npm Inc.
  • 02:20 - Discussion of Forrest’s JSConf 2014 talk
  • 03:30 - Rise of community standards, Douglas Crockford’s the Good Parts, John Resig jQuery, Promises A+ standard
  • 05:50 - Standards committees, an inside look
  • 08:00 - ES4, ES5, Harmony, ES7 (champion for each feature)
  • 10:00 - test262 - conformance test suite
  • 11:58 - Our community has the power to figure out what features in ES6 are useful. Sort out the parts that are genuinely useful. Figure out the good parts now.
  • 14:48 - Module proposal benefited from critical discussions from the community
  • 16:00 - Tools for using ES6 features now
  • 17:26 - Development community needs to get on top of things and teach how we use the features with emphasis on the compelling parts.
  • 18:50 - Forrest no longer recommends Crockford’s Good Parts to new developers because half is scar tissue and dogma, instead Dave Herman’s Effective JavaScript which gives them a mental toolkit to determine their own style
  • 20:55 - Don’t concentrate on what’s cool, but concentrate on what’s stable and effective. As an educator be conservative.
  • 21:29 - Warnings from Java, Perl history
  • 24:00 - Typescript and Coffeescript bring things to the table but they could fragment the community
  • 24:40 - ES timeline
  • 26:30 - Features need enough examination to ensure they are finished
  • 28:00 - Keeping some things in user land to see what community comes up with. Developers as leaders in this transition.
  • 29:00 - npm growth, npm Inc dev ops, addressing pain points in npm CLI
  • 34:30 - All software languages have something that is terrible. Community is something that makes Node.js special.
  • 35:45 - Node.js in the enterprise is happening very rapidly. A very interesting time to be in the middle of this evolution.

Links

  • Forrest Norvell, npm product maker at npm Inc. twitter
  • npm Inc. - npm, Inc. supports the JavaScript community by providing the registry where developers publish and share packaged open-source modules.
  • traceur - Traceur is a JavaScript.next-to-JavaScript-of-today compiler. Compile ES6 code into JS which can be used by today’s browsers.
  • es6-shim - Provides compatibility shims so that legacy JavaScript engines behave as closely as possible to ECMAScript 6 (Harmony).
  • es6-module-transpiler - ES6 Module Transpiler is a JavaScript library for converting JavaScript files written using the ES6 draft specification module syntax to existing library-based module systems such as AMD, CommonJS, or simply globals.
  • sweet.js - Macros for javascript which can be used to add in ES6 features.
  • es6ify - browserify v2 transform to compile JavaScript.next (ES6) to JavaScript.current (ES5) on the fly.
  • ES6 compatibility table - ES6 compatibility table, comparing browser versions, Node.js. Links to ES6 feature descriptions.
  • Spider Monkey - Firefox JS engine written in C++. Currently Spider Monkey is leading in the number of ES6 features that are implemented. (56/66 according to Kangax)
  • Effective JavaScript - David Herman’s book
  • Jeff Barczewski, Founder, CodeWinds twitter
  • CodeWinds twitter

Videos

Jun 24 2014
38 mins
Play

Rank #10: 006 Daniel Shaw (@dshaw) introduces NodeSource at JSConf 2014

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Watch video on YouTube

  1. Episode Info
  2. Episode Notes
    1. NodeSource Team (mentioned in interview)
    2. Social Media Links

Episode Info

  • Episode: CW 006
  • Published: June 18th, 2014
  • Tags: nodejs, jsconf
  • Duration: 23:54

Episode Notes

NodeSource is a professional Node.js software company. NodeSource provides enterprise-grade software products and educational and professional consulting services to empower companies to be effective and productive with Node.js.

  • https://nodesource.com/ - NodeSource website with team background
  • https://nodesource.com/products - NodeSource products
    • npm Plus - NodeSource is the premier, certified reseller of on-premise, private npm instances. NodeSource has partnered with npm Inc. to deliver a secure, on-premise, private npm solution alongside managed services such as:
      • Bespoke npm Training
      • 24x7x365 Support
      • Custom Integrations (LDAP, SSO, etc.)
    • N|Ship - NodeSource’s official Node.js deployment solution to make app deployments easy, secure and automated.
  • http://2014.jsconf.us/ - JSConf 2014 - May 27-31, 2014 at Amelia Island, FL

NodeSource Team (mentioned in interview)

![DanShaw][] ![JoeMccann][] ![RodVagg][] ![ChrisWilliams][] ![TrevorNorris][]

Social Media Links

NodeSource Team (partial list)

  • NodeSource twitter
  • Daniel Shaw, Co-founder twitter
  • Joe McCann, Co-founder twitter
  • Rod Vagg, Director of Engineering twitter
  • Chris Williams, Director of Professional Services twitter
  • Trevor Norris, Node.js Maintainer twitter

CodeWinds

Jun 18 2014
23 mins
Play

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