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The Seminar Room

“The Seminar Room” (TSR) is a religious studies podcast by and for students and scholars of religion that engages specific texts and concepts in religious studies theory and method, philosophy and critical theory. Our regular contributors are Joel Harrison, Lucas Scott Wright and Sean Capener.The format and title of the podcast are meant to reflect “the seminar room” in which grad students encounter and reflect upon texts in their respective graduate programs. Our goal is to provide an online seminar room in which contributors may debate texts and ideas in a way that opens up further discussion with our listeners.Episodes are released every other week on Saturdays. In addition to our podcast recordings, our blog contains supplementary introductions to and reflections on the texts, and links to each text we discuss. Visit the blog at www.tsrpodcast.comIf you want to contact us you may find us here:Gmail: seminarroomcast@gmail.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/TheSeminarRoom

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The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

The long-anticipated appearance of Sean Capener finally happens here in Episode 5, where he, Lucas, and Joel discuss Max Weber’s _The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism_ (1904/5). They discuss the differences between Weber and other genealogical accounts of religion, Weber’s philosophical inheritance, and his occupation of a liminal space among reductive, interpretive, descriptive, and genealogical accounts of religion. Sean was traveling, so he bounces a little early, but Joel and Lucas bring it home with a discussion of how Weber fits into the discussions in the first four episodes of the podcast. “The Seminar Room” (TSR) is a religious studies podcast by and for students and scholars of religion that engages specific texts and concepts in religious studies theory and method, philosophy and critical theory. Our regular contributors are Joel Harrison, Lucas Scott Wright, and Sean Capener. The format and title of the podcast are meant to reflect “the seminar room” in which grad students encounter and reflect upon texts in their respective graduate programs. Our goal is to provide an online seminar room in which contributors may debate texts and ideas in a way that opens up further discussion with our listeners. Episodes are released every other week on Saturdays. In addition to our podcast recordings, this blog contains supplementary introductions to and reflections on the texts, and links to each text we discuss. Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or using FeedBurner. If you want to contact us you may find us here: Gmail: seminarroomcast@gmail.com Twitter: @TheSeminarRoom

27 Feb 2016

Rank #1

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The Elementary Forms of Religious Life

The long anticipated episode on Émile Durkheim’s The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912) finally happens in Episode 6. It was AAR Judgment Day when we recorded (aka the final deadline for paper and panel submissions to the American Academy of Religion’s national conference in November), so Sean and Lucas reward themselves with a little boxed wine. Joel and Lucas disagree over the similarities and dis-similarities between Durkheim and Freud, the status of “society” as a concept is discussed, and Sean’s WiFi cuts out in an electrical storm leaving Joel and Lucas to bring it home. We promise Sean will be on for an entire episode soon. “The Seminar Room” (TSR) is a religious studies podcast by and for students and scholars of religion that engages specific texts and concepts in religious studies theory and method, philosophy and critical theory. Our regular contributors are Joel Harrison, Lucas Scott Wright and Sean Capener. The format and title of the podcast are meant to reflect “the seminar room” in which grad students encounter and reflect upon texts in their respective graduate programs. Our goal is to provide an online seminar room in which contributors may debate texts and ideas in a way that opens up further discussion with our listeners. Episodes are released every other week on Saturdays. In addition to our podcast recordings, this blog contains supplementary introductions to and reflections on the texts, and links to each text we discuss. Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or using FeedBurner. If you want to contact us you may find us here: Gmail: seminarroomcast@gmail.com Twitter: @TheSeminarRoom

1hr 43mins

12 Mar 2016

Rank #2

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American Academy of Religion in Review 2016

It’s a new year and a new episode from The Seminar Room! After taking a break for the Fall term, Joel and Lucas return with a recap of their experience at the 2016 American Academy of Religion conference in San Antonio.

1hr 42mins

17 Jan 2017

Rank #3

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Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences

Episode 11, in which Joel and Lucas discuss an essay by Jacques Derrida and make the case for Derrida’s relevance in religious studies. Lucas explains why everyone should read more philosophy AND try to understand it. Joel explains why this essay by Derrida kind of puts a damper on a lot of religious studies scholars’ claims to post-structuralism.

1hr 39mins

28 Aug 2016

Rank #4

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On the Genealogy of Morals

Lucas was sick for a while and Sean was swamped with the end of his first year approaching, so we departed from our normal biweekly schedule. But we’re back! This week Joel and Lucas discuss Friedrich Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals (1887). But before they dive into the text, they give a recap of their respective AAR regional meetings (Midwest and Western). Joel explains why Northern Indiana such a fascinating place to visit for a scholar of religion, and Lucas describes a “lively” business meeting. In discussing the text, they get into what “valuation” means for Nietzsche, why goodness, badness, and evil are not natural, and why Nietzsche loves ascetic priests so much and thinks Wagner and Schopenhauer are inauthentic hipsters. Take that hipster artist-philosophers who love to quote Nietzsche! “The Seminar Room” (TSR) is a religious studies podcast by and for students and scholars of religion that engages specific texts and concepts in religious studies theory and method, philosophy and critical theory. Our regular contributors are Joel Harrison, Lucas Scott Wright and Sean Capener. The format and title of the podcast are meant to reflect “the seminar room” in which grad students encounter and reflect upon texts in their respective graduate programs. Our goal is to provide an online seminar room in which contributors may debate texts and ideas in a way that opens up further discussion with our listeners. Episodes are released every other week on Saturdays. In addition to our podcast recordings, this blog contains supplementary introductions to and reflections on the texts, and links to each text we discuss. Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or using FeedBurner. If you want to contact us you may find us here: Gmail: seminarroomcast@gmail.com Twitter: @TheSeminarRoom

16 Apr 2016

Rank #5