Cover image of A Delectable Education Charlotte Mason Podcast
(680)

Rank #57 in Courses category

Education
Courses

A Delectable Education Charlotte Mason Podcast

Updated about 22 hours ago

Rank #57 in Courses category

Education
Courses
Read more

Through weekly conversations, three moms who have studied the Charlotte Mason method of education and put her ideas into practice in their homes join together to share with one another for the benefit of listeners by giving explanations of Mason's principles and examples of those principles put into practice out of their own teaching experience. These short discussions aim at providing information, support, and encouragement for others by unfolding the myriad aspects.

Read more

Through weekly conversations, three moms who have studied the Charlotte Mason method of education and put her ideas into practice in their homes join together to share with one another for the benefit of listeners by giving explanations of Mason's principles and examples of those principles put into practice out of their own teaching experience. These short discussions aim at providing information, support, and encouragement for others by unfolding the myriad aspects.

iTunes Ratings

680 Ratings
Average Ratings
642
23
9
2
4

Extremely Helpful

By aegreer22 - Dec 08 2019
Read more
I love the depth of study in this podcast. So helpful!

Listen to this!

By listener#1000 - Jul 01 2019
Read more
They put a lot of labor into this. It was well-prepared from the beginning. I have learned so much.

iTunes Ratings

680 Ratings
Average Ratings
642
23
9
2
4

Extremely Helpful

By aegreer22 - Dec 08 2019
Read more
I love the depth of study in this podcast. So helpful!

Listen to this!

By listener#1000 - Jul 01 2019
Read more
They put a lot of labor into this. It was well-prepared from the beginning. I have learned so much.

Listen to:

Cover image of A Delectable Education Charlotte Mason Podcast

A Delectable Education Charlotte Mason Podcast

Updated about 22 hours ago

Read more

Through weekly conversations, three moms who have studied the Charlotte Mason method of education and put her ideas into practice in their homes join together to share with one another for the benefit of listeners by giving explanations of Mason's principles and examples of those principles put into practice out of their own teaching experience. These short discussions aim at providing information, support, and encouragement for others by unfolding the myriad aspects.

Rank #1: Episode 79: The Early Years

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason had much to say about children even before they start formal school lessons. This podcast explores the wide world of the preschooler and what families should do to make the most of the early years, the "golden hours" of life before school officially begins.

May 05 2017

42mins

Play

Rank #2: Episode 168: Habit Training

Podcast cover
Read more

"Education, said Charlotte Mason, is an "atmosphere, a discipline, and a life." Habit formation, the discipline, is fundamental to our function as persons. Miss Mason offers descriptions of habit formation as well as counsel on habit training. Emily, Liz, and Nicole discuss the essentials for building those habits that make for "the good life."

Apr 12 2019

1hr

Play

Rank #3: Episode 14: History Books

Podcast cover
Read more

When we are clear in the direction we are headed in our children's history studies, know the time period and the order and the streams to cover, what books will we use to explore those unfathomable numbers of events and characters in history? Is a spine necessary? What is the real value of a biography? How much should we be concerned about the historical accuracy of the account we are reading? Explore these ideas with us in this episode. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome

"[B]ut let the mother beware: there is nothing which calls for more delicate tact and understanding sympathy with the children than this apparently simple matter of choosing their lesson-books, and especially, perhaps, their lesson-books in history." (Vol. 1, pg. 289) "We know that young people are enormously interested in the subject and give concentrated attention if we give them the right books." (Vol. 6, pg. ) "The knowledge of children so taught is consecutive, intelligent and complete as far as it goes, in however many directions." (Vol. 6, pg. 158) "In Form IV the children are promoted to Gardiner's Student's History of England, clear and able, but somewhat stiffer than that they have hitherto been engaged upon." (Vol. 6, pg. 176) "Of all the pleasant places in the world of mind, I do not know that any are more delightful than those in the domain of History. Have you ever looked through a kinetoscope? Many figures are there, living and moving, dancing, walking in procession, whatever they happened to be doing at the time the picture was taken. History is a little like that, only much more interesting, because in these curious living photographs the figures are very small and rather dim, and most attentive gazing cannot make them clearer; now, History shows you its personages, clothed as they were clothed, moving, looking, speaking, as they looked, moved, and spoke, engaged in serious matters or in pleasures; and, the longer you look at any one person, the more clearly he stands out until at last he may become more real to you than the people who live in your own home." (Vol. 4, pg. 36) "The fatal mistake is in the notion that he must learn 'outlines,' or a baby edition of the whole history of England, or of Rome, just as he must cover the geography of all the world. Let him, on the contrary, linger pleasantly over the history of a single man, a short period, until he thinks the thoughts of that man, is at home in the ways of that period. Though he is reading and thinking of the lifetime of a single man, he is really getting intimately acquainted with the history of a whole nation for a whole age." (Vol. 1, pg. 280) "Literature is dangerous--except when taken in large doses." --Martin Cothran (quoted here.)

America Begins, Alice Dalgliesh America Builds Homes, Alice Dalgliesh And There Was America, Roger Duvoisin Land of the Free, Enid LaMonte Meadowcroft D'Aulaire Picture Biographies Gerald Johnson's A History for Peter: America is Born (Volume 1) America Grows Up (Volume 2) America Moves Forward (Volume 3) Dorothy Mills' History Books, Reprints available as well Paul Johnson's Histories Barbara Tuchman's Histories Basic History of the United States, Clarence Carson The Silent Storm, Marion Marsh Brown and Ruth Crone Isaac Newton, Harry Sootin (Contains affiliate links)

A wonderful resource with reviews of living books series, See especially Messner Biographies, Signature Series, Garrard History Series Books, and Landmark Books

Mar 06 2017

22mins

Play

Rank #4: Episode 33: Scheduling a Charlotte Mason Education

Podcast cover
Read more
This Charlotte Mason podcast focuses on time management: how do we get organized to spread this feast of innumerable subjects, how do we fit everything in, and how do we manage multiple children at various levels with differing needs and subjects. Practical tips, resources, ideas, and time-tested wisdom is abundant in this conversation. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome Our Podcast Episode that talks about the Habit of Attention Nicole's step-by-step guide to preparing your CM schedule A Form by Form breakdown of which subjects are studied when and what lessons those subjects include at each age level Liz, Emily, and Nicole can help you create your own schedule and/or custom curriculum

May 13 2016

39mins

Play

Rank #5: Episode 182: Visualization

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason understood a fundamental skill persons have in learning:  visualization. Emily, Liz, and Nicole focus this week's discussion on how Ms. Mason utilized this ability in children to maximize learning across the curriculum.

Sep 13 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #6: Episode 83: Form IB Recap

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason wanted children to set good intellectual habits, and these begin in the first year of formal lessons. A. A. Milne said, "Now we are Six," Mason said, "Now it's time to read," and this episode will describe the scope of the first year of school and its lessons.

Jun 09 2017

23mins

Play

Rank #7: Episode 8: Narration, The Act of Knowing

Podcast cover
Read more
The work in a Charlotte Mason lesson is in reading and narrating. How this is implemented practically is the focus of this episode. The discussion addresses when, what, and how to narrate, and above all, why narration is effective. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome “What we have perhaps failed to discover hitherto is the immense hunger for knowledge (curiosity) existing in everyone and the immeasurable power of attention with which everyone is endowed; that everyone likes knowledge best in a literary form; that the knowledge should be exceedingly various concerning many things on which the mind of man reflects; but that knowledge is acquired only by what we may call "the act of knowing," which is both encouraged and tested by narration, and which further requires the later test and record afforded by examinations.” (Vol. 6, pp. 290-91) “This, of getting ideas out of them, is by no means all we must do with books. ‘In all labor there is profit,’ at any rate in some labor, and the labor of thought is what his book must induce in the child. He must generalise, classify, infer, judge, visualize, discriminate, labor in one way or another, with that capable mind of his, until the substance of his book is assimilated or rejected, according as he shall determine; for the determination rests with him and not with his teacher.” (Vol. 3, p. 179) "Bobbie will come home with a heroic narrative of a fight he has seen between 'Duke' and a dog in the street. It is wonderful! He has seen everything, and he tells everything with splendid vigour in the true epic vein; but so ingrained is our contempt for children that we see nothing in this but Bobbie's foolish childish way! Whereas here, if we have eyes to see and grace to build, is the ground-plan of his education." (Vol. 1, p. 231) “They must read the given pages and tell what they have read, they must perform, that is, what we may call the act of knowing. We are all aware, alas, what a monstrous quantity of printed matter has gone into the dustbin of our memories, because we have failed to perform that quite natural and spontaneous 'act of knowing,' as easy to a child as breathing and, if we would believe it, comparatively easy to ourselves.” (Vol. 6, p. 99) “Long ago, I was in the habit of hearing this axiom quoted by a philosophical old friend: "The mind can know nothing save what it can produce in the form of an answer to a question put to the mind by itself." I have failed to trace the saying to its source, but a conviction of its importance has been growing upon me during the last forty years. It tacitly prohibits questioning from without; (this does not, of course, affect the Socratic use of questioning for purposes of moral conviction); and it is necessary to intellectual certainty, to the act of knowing. For example, to secure a conversation or an incident, we 'go over it in our minds'; that is, the mind puts itself through the process of self-questioning which I have indicated. This is what happens in the narrating of a passage read: each new consecutive incident or statement arrives because the mind asks itself,––"What next?" For this reason it is important that only one reading should be allowed; efforts to memorise weaken the power of attention, the proper activity of the mind; if it is desirable to ask questions in order to emphasize certain points, these should be asked after and not before, or during, the act of narration.” (Vol. 6, pp. 16-17) "It is not wise to tease them with corrections." (Vol. 1, p. 233) "Narrations which are mere feats of memory are quite valueless." (Vol. 1, p. 289) “[I]t is not a bad test of education to be able to give the points of a description, the sequence of a series of incidents, the links in a chain of argument, correctly, after a single careful reading. This is a power which a barrister, a publisher, a scholar, labours to acquire; and it is a power which children can acquire with great ease, and once acquired, the gulf is bridged which divides the reading from the non-reading community. ––But this is only one way to use books: others are to enumerate the statements in a given paragraph or chapter; to analyse a chapter, to divide it into paragraphs under proper headings, to tabulate and classify series; to trace cause to consequence and consequence to cause; to discern character and perceive how character and circumstance interact; to get lessons of life and conduct, or the living knowledge which makes for science, out of books; all this is possible for school boys and girls, and until they have begun to use books for themselves in such ways, they can hardly be said to have begun their education.” (Vol. 3, p. 180) “Education...demands a conscious mental effort...the mental effort of telling again that which has been read or heard. That is how we all learn, we tell again, to ourselves if need be, the matter we wish to retain, the sermon, the lecture, the conversation. The method is as old as the mind of man, the distressful fact is that it has been made so little use of in general education.” (Vol. 6, pp. 159-60) If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Vol. 3, Chapter XVI Vol. 6, Introduction, Chapter X Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, Betty Edwards Writing to Learn, William Zinsser (Contains affiliate links) Carroll Smith on Narration here, here, and here. Jen Spencer One study on effectiveness of narration found here. A helpful article on narration from the Parents' Review

Jul 06 2016

32mins

Play

Rank #8: Episode 91: When Mothers Get Weary

Podcast cover
Read more

This podcast faces the reality: a Charlotte Mason education is rewarding--but enormous! It is normal to become weary, worried, and woeful at times about the immense and multitudinous tasks of educating our children, not to mention feeding, clothing, and caring for them daily. The ADE mothers have been in the trenches and share strategies and wisdom for running the race without giving up.

Sep 15 2017

34mins

Play

Rank #9: Episode 108: Masterly Inactivity

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason encouraged a practice called "Masterly Inactivity." Emily, Liz, and Nicole discuss what this is, why it is important, and how in the world a mother actually manages to balance law and freedom in her home.

Jan 12 2018

45mins

Play

Rank #10: Episode 3: The Role of the Teacher

Podcast cover
Read more
Charlotte Mason has a unique view of the student and the way in which he learns. This episode focuses on the role of the teacher and how his responsibilities and approach to teaching likewise take on a different perspective in her method. Nicole, Emily and Liz begin with a comparison of traditional teaching qualifications versus Mason's requirements for teachers, concluding with the life-changing help every teacher has at her disposal. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome "We may not despise them, or hinder them ('suffer the little children'), or offend them by our brutish clumsiness of action and want of serious thought; while the one positive precept afforded to us is 'feed' (which should be rendered 'pasture') 'my lambs,' place them in the midst of abundant food." (Towards a Philosophy of Education, pg. 81) "[Y]ou may bring a horse to the water, but you cannot make him drink. What I complain of is that we do not bring our horse to the water. We give him miserable little text-books, mere compendiums of facts, which he is to learn off and say and produce at an examination; or we give him various knowledge in the form of warm diluents, prepared by his teacher with perhaps some grains of living thought to the gallon. And all the time we have books, books teeming with ideas fresh from the minds of thinkers upon every subject to which we can wish to introduce children." (School Education, pg. 171) "[T]he great recognition, that God the Holy Spirit is Himself, personally, the Imparter of knowledge, the Instructor of youth, the Inspirer of genius, is a conception so far lost to us that we should think it distinctly irreverent to conceive of the divine teaching as co-operating with ours in a child's arithmetic lesson, for example. But the Florentine mind of the Middle Ages went further than this: it believed, not only that the seven Liberal Arts were fully under the direct outpouring of the Holy Ghost, but that every fruitful idea, every original conception, whether in Euclid, or grammar, or music, was a direct inspiration from the Holy Spirit, without any thought at all as to whether the person so inspired named himself by the name of God, or recognised whence his inspiration came." (Parents and Children, pg. 270-71) “Let this be the mother's key to the whole of the education of each boy and each girl; not of her children; the Divine Spirit does not work with nouns of multitude, but with each single child. Because He is infinite, the whole world is not too great a school for this indefatigable Teacher, and because He is infinite, He is able to give the whole of his infinite attention for the whole time to each one of his multitudinous pupils. We do not sufficiently rejoice in the wealth that the infinite nature of our God brings to each of us.” (Parents and Children, pg. 273) "[W]e perceive that the great work of education is to inspire children with vitalising ideas as to every relation of life, every department of knowledge, every subject of thought; and to give deliberate care to the formation of those habits of the good life which are the outcome of vitalising ideas. In this great work we seek and assuredly find the cooperation of the Divine Spirit, whom we recognise, in a sense rather new to modern thought, as the supreme Educator of mankind in things that have been called secular, fully as much as in those that have been called sacred." (Towards a Philosophy of Education, pg. 173) If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Parents and Children (Volume 2), Chapter 25 School Education (Volume 3), Chapters 1-3 Towards a Philosophy of Education (Volume 6), Chapters 5 and 10, section 2 Mornings in Florence, John Ruskin (Contains affiliate links) The Descent of the Holy Spirit Fresco here and here

Oct 16 2015

14mins

Play

Rank #11: Episode 4: Three Tools of Education

Podcast cover
Read more
If education is not information, what is it? How do we as teachers feed the whole person's natural desire to know? Emily, Nicole, and Liz discuss the tools to implement in education, the motto Mason took for her teachers: "Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life," defining, discussing, and providing real life instances of these instruments put into practice. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome 4. These principles are limited by the respect due to the personality of children, which must not be encroached upon whether by the direct use of fear or love, suggestion or influence, or by undue play upon any one natural desire. 5. Therefore, we are limited to three educational instruments--the atmosphere of environment, the discipline of habit, and the presentation of living ideas. The P.N.E.U. Motto is: "Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life." (Preface to the Home Education Series) "The child breathes the atmosphere emanating from his parents; that of the ideas which rule their own lives." (Parents and Children, pg. 247) "Parents and teachers should know how to make sensible use of a child's circumstances (atmosphere) to forward his sound education." (School Education, pg. 182) "Attention is hardly even an operation of the mind, but is simply the act by which the whole mental force is applied to the subject in hand...For whatever the natural gifts of the child, it is only in so far as the habit of attention is cultivated in him that he is able to make use of them." (Home Education, pgs. 145-146) "A single idea may be a possession so precious in itself, so fruitful, that the parent cannot fitly allow the child's selection of ideas to be a matter of chance; his lessons should furnish him with such ideas as shall make for his further education." (Home Education, pg. 174) "In the early days of a child's life it makes little apparent difference whether we educate with a notion of filling a receptacle, inscribing a tablet, moulding plastic matter, or nourishing a life, but as a child grows we shall perceive that only those ideas which have fed his life, are taken into his being; all the rest is cast away or is, like sawdust in the system, an impediment and an injury." (Towards a Philosophy of Education, pgs. 108-109) "A time-table, written out fairly, so that the child knows what he has to do and how long each lesson is to last." (Home Education, pg. 142) "A Child gets through their morning lessons without any sign of weariness." (Home Education, pg. 142) "It is only as we recognise our limitations that our work becomes effective: when we see definitely what we are to do, what we can do, and what we cannot do, we set to work with confidence and courage; we have an end in view, and we make our way intelligently towards that end, and a way to an end is method. It rests with parents not only to give their children birth into the life of intelligence and moral power, but to sustain the higher life which they have borne." (Parents and Children, pg. 33) If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Home Education, Part V: Lessons as Instruments of Education Parents and Children, chapters IV, VII, and XXII School Education, chapter XIV Towards a Philosophy of Education, chapter VI

Oct 23 2015

26mins

Play

Rank #12: When The Feast Is Too Much: Listener Q&A #28

Podcast cover
Read more
This month's Charlotte Mason podcast question for us is asked so often in so many forms that the entire episode is devoted to it. Multiple questions are summed up in "Am I failing? What if I'm not doing things perfectly, not doing it all, leaving out subjects, don't know what I'm doing, can't figure it all out, am avoiding subjects...should I give up?" Emily, Liz and Nicole share Miss Mason's counsel, Biblical encouragement, and their own honest experiences.

Oct 26 2018

42mins

Play

Rank #13: Episode 98: Drawing

Podcast cover
Read more

Drawing was an essential component of the Charlotte Mason feast of subjects, and this podcast episode describes her purpose for including this skill. If drawing intimidates or paralyzes you because of your own feelings of incompetence to instruct, Emily offers practical tips for opening the world of expression through drawing for your children of all ages.

"It is only what we have truly seen that we can truly reproduce, hence, observation is enormously trained by art teaching. Personally, I believe every living soul can learn to draw from actual objects, if the eye has not first been vitiated by seeing copies of them." (Miss Pennethorne, PR 10)

"This is what we wish to do for children in teaching them to draw--to cause the eye to rest, not unconsciously, but consciously n some object of beauty which will leave in their minds an image of delight for all their lives to come." (Vol. 1, p. 313)

"Art, when rightly directed, is educational, for it trains not only one faculty, but all the faculties together; it trains the hand and the eye, and it trains the head and the heart; it teaches us to see and to see truly; it teaches us to think--that science can do; but it teaches us also to admire and to love; it disciplines the emotions." (Mr. Collingwood, The Fesole Club Papers)

"...the great benefit of "brushwork" being that it can be made quite a moral training in exactness and decision." (Mrs. Perrin, "Brush Drawing", PR 4)

"Children should learn to draw as they learn to write. The great point is that they should be encouraged, not flattered. With no help and encouragement the child gradually loses his desire to draw." (Mrs. Steinthal, "Art Training in the Nursery", PR 1)

"There are two great points that must be remembered if we wish to make our system of art teaching...successful. The first is, always keep the children interested. Next, let us understand that drawing is not only learnt with a pencil and a piece of paper....The chief value of drawing is that it trains the eye to see things as they are." (Mrs. Steinthal, PR 1)

"...we must be careful not to offer any aids in the way of guiding lines, points, and other such crutches; and also that he should work in the easiest medium; that is, with paint-brush or with charcoal, and not with a black-lead pencil. Boxes of cheap colours are to be avoided. Children are worthy of the best." (Vol. 1, p. 313)

"The first buttercup in a child's nature note book is shockingly crude, the sort of thing to scandalise a teacher of brush-drawing, but by and by another buttercup will appear with the delicate poise, uplift and radiance of the growing flower." (Vol. 6, p. 217)

"Drawing is nothing to do with talent, but can be done with observation, intelligence and application--or by seeing, remembering and expressing and is a fundamentally educative subject." (Juliet Williams, "The Teaching of Drawing and Its Place in Education", PR 34)

School Education (Volume 3), p. 205

Ourselves (Volume ), Book I, Part II, Chapters II and V

An Essay Towards a Philosophy of Education, Book I, Chapter X (f)

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, Betty Edwards

(Affiliate Links)

Drawing Lessons, Florence Monkhouse (PR Article)

Brush Drawing, Miss K. Loveday (PR Article)

The Teaching of Drawing and Its Place in Education, Juliet Williams (PR Article)

Brush Drawing, Mrs H. Perrin (PR Article)

Fesole Club Papers, Mr. W. G. Collingwood

What To Draw and How to Draw It

In A Large Room Retreat

Nov 03 2017

45mins

Play

Rank #14: Episode 141: Slipshod Habits of Reading

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason referred to "slipshod" habits in reading. This podcast episode describes what she meant. Nothing is more important than reading in a literature-rich education, but there is a lot of reading habit formation that must occur between being a decoder and being a beautiful reader.

Oct 05 2018

22mins

Play

Rank #15: Episode 62: Afternoons

Podcast cover
Read more
Charlotte Mason's morning lessons accomplish much, but this podcast episode focuses on what comes after. What does a mother do with that long afternoon the children should have, how do we manage the activities of life as well as all the occupations Mason insisted should occur outside of school time? This is a thorough discussion of mother's responsibilities, children's freedom and time management, and the purpose of those leisure hours after school books are closed for the day. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome "That the claims of the schoolroom should not be allowed to encroach on the child's right to long hours daily for exercise and investigation." (Vol. 1, p. 177) "Thus, the morning, after breakfast (the digestion of which lighter meal is not a severe task), is much the best time for lessons and every sort of mental work; if the whole afternoon cannot be spared for out-of-door recreation, that is the time for mechanical tasks such as needlework, drawing, practising; the children's wits are bright enough in the evening, but the drawback to evening work is, that the brain, once excited, is inclined to carry on its labours beyond bed-time, and dreams, wakefulness, and uneasy sleep attend the poor child who has been at work until the last minute. If the elder children must work in the evening, they should have at least one or two pleasant social hours before they go to bed; but, indeed, we owe it to the children to abolish evening 'preparation.'" (Vol. 1, p. 23) "Five of the thirteen waking hours should be at the disposal of the children; three, at least, of these, from two o'clock to five, for example, should be spent out of doors in all but very bad weather. This is the opportunity for out-of-door work, collecting wild flowers, describing walks and views, etc. (see Home Education). Brisk work and ample leisure and freedom should be the rule of the Home School. The Children's Day will, on the whole, run this: Lessons, 1 1/2 to 4 hours; meals, 2 hours; occupations, 1 to 3 hours; leisure, 5 to 7 hours, according to age. The work not done in its own time should be left undone. Children should not be embarrassed with arrears, and they should have dues sense of the importance of time, and that there is no other time for work not done in its own time. Should the children flag at any time, a day's holiday, a little country excursion, should refresh them." (From Suggestions which accompanied the PNEU Programmes) "[Referring to the afternoon occupations]...at any time of day, in any division of time, to suit family arrangements; when possible, out of doors." (From Suggestions which accompanied the PNEU Programmes) If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Home Education, Part II: Out of Door Life of Children List of Afternoon Activities

Jan 06 2017

35mins

Play

Rank #16: Episode 149: God in the Laboratory

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason has given us a method of education. What does this imply? Was it based on  tradition? science? natural or divine law? And, what in all practical use, do these questions have to do with the day-in and day-out teaching of our children. How much do we consider the evidence of modern research and measurement in determining our curriculum or our teaching techniques? Join the rousing discussion between our friend, Art Middlekauff, and Emily, Nicole, and Liz as we wrestle with the true goal of education and the push and pull of modern convictions.

Nov 30 2018

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #17: Episode 115: Authority & Docility, Part I

Podcast cover
Read more

Charlotte Mason addressed parenting issues in concurrence with her philosophy of education. This podcast episode is the first of a three-part series on her third principle of "authority and docility." The first portion today concerns the right view of authority in our lives.

Mar 02 2018

20mins

Play

Rank #18: Episode 55: Elementary Math

Podcast cover
Read more
This week's Charlotte Mason podcast addresses math in the elementary years. How much should be covered? How should it be presented? How do we build confidence, competence, and progress? Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome "The Principality of Mathematics is a mountainous land, but the air is very fine and health-giving, though some people find it too rare for their breathing. It differs from most mountainous countries in this, that you cannot lose your way, and that every step taken is on firm ground. People who seek their work or play in this principality find themselves braced by effort and satisfied with truth." (Vol. 4, p. 38) [A child should know at 12 years old:] "...g) in Arithmetic, they should have some knowledge of vulgar and decimal fractions, percentage, household accounts, etc. h) Should have a knowledge of Elementary Algebra, and should have done practical exercises in Geometry." (Vol. 3, p. 301) "[Mathematics] should give to children the sense of limitation which is wholesome for all of us, and inspire that sursam corda which we should hear in all natural law." (Vol. 6, p. 231) If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Home Education, Part V, XV Ourselves, Book I, pp. 38; 62-63 Towards a Philosophy of Education, Book I, Chapter 10, Section III Strayer-Upton's Books--helpful for mental arithmetic/story problems (Contains affiliate links) Richele Baburina's Mathematics: A Guide for Living Teaching Benezet's Article on informal math instruction in the early years Parents' Review Article on "Number"

Nov 18 2016

27mins

Play

Rank #19: Episode 111: Notebooks and Paperwork, Part I

Podcast cover
Read more

This Charlotte Mason education podcast focuses on the papers, the recordings, and drawings--all the reproductions of knowledge in the making. In particular, Liz, Nicole, and Emily address the explicitly described or preserved examples of various notebooks Mason's students used from which we can glean ideas to benefit our own students today.

Feb 02 2018

53mins

Play

Rank #20: Episode 15: History Things

Podcast cover
Read more
Beyond the books, what are some tools that are useful in putting history into living color for a child? At what age should we begin to use a timeline, or should we use a timeline at all? How do we implement the book of centuries? Listen in as we wrestle with some of the things that make history lessons come alive. Listen Now: If you are seeing this message, please make sure you are using the most current version of your web browser: Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome If you would like to study along with us, here are some passages from The Home Education Series and other Parent's Review articles that would be helpful for this episode's topic. You may also read the series online here, or get the free Kindle version from Fisher Academy. Home Education (Volume 1), pg. 292 Towards a Philosophy of Education (Volume 6), pg. 177 Miss Beale's Parents' Review Article on "The Teaching of Chronology" Parents' Review Article on making and keeping a Book of Centuries The Living Page, Laurie Bestvater (Contains affiliate links) Laurie Bestvater's Book of Centuries Another Book of Centuries from Riverbend Press Bernau's Article on the Book of Centuries With much gratitude to the Charlotte Mason Institute for making this PDF available Beale's Article on the Teaching of Chronology With much gratitude to the Charlotte Mason Institute for making this PDF available H.B.'s Article on the Teaching of History With much gratitude to the Charlotte Mason Institute for making this PDF available Biggar's Article on How to Make a Century Chart With much gratitude to the Charlotte Mason Institute for making this PDF available

Oct 05 2016

22mins

Play