Cover image of SAGE Psychology & Psychiatry
(13)

Rank #188 in Social Sciences category

Society & Culture
Science
Social Sciences

SAGE Psychology & Psychiatry

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #188 in Social Sciences category

Society & Culture
Science
Social Sciences
Read more

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Psychology & Psychiatry.SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

Read more

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Psychology & Psychiatry.SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
5
2
1
1

Relationship Matters

By byebyebabyboy - Sep 07 2017
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I generally enjoy this podcast because it introduces new research in an approachable way. However, I find the host of relationship matters sexist and immature. In the podcast titled "Pillow Talk," he interrupted the author to interject whether oxytocin makes people cuddle. He and his cohost also could not move on from buzz words like "testosterone" and "orgasm." And at the conclusion of the podcast when the author invited further questions, he seemed disengaged and then belittled her by closing with "bye-bye." Pretty sure she's a grown woman and an academic scholar, not a baby. Don't infantalize women. I highly doubt this would have occurred with a male author.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
5
2
1
1

Relationship Matters

By byebyebabyboy - Sep 07 2017
Read more
I generally enjoy this podcast because it introduces new research in an approachable way. However, I find the host of relationship matters sexist and immature. In the podcast titled "Pillow Talk," he interrupted the author to interject whether oxytocin makes people cuddle. He and his cohost also could not move on from buzz words like "testosterone" and "orgasm." And at the conclusion of the podcast when the author invited further questions, he seemed disengaged and then belittled her by closing with "bye-bye." Pretty sure she's a grown woman and an academic scholar, not a baby. Don't infantalize women. I highly doubt this would have occurred with a male author.

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Cover image of SAGE Psychology & Psychiatry

SAGE Psychology & Psychiatry

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Psychology & Psychiatry.SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.

Rank #1: Relationship Matters

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Relationship Matters 93 “Avoidant and defensive: Adult attachment and quality of apologies”

May 01 2019

18mins

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Rank #2: JCA Podcast with David Blustein

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In this inaugural episode of the Journal of Career Assessment podcast series, JCA Editor Ryan Duffy interviews David Blustein (Boston College) about his own career path and the seminal work he's done in counseling and vocational psychology.

Jan 14 2019

37mins

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Rank #3: JBP: "My Mother's Keeper": The Effects of Parentification on Black Female College Students

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Authors Tawanna T. Gilford and Amy Reynolds discuss their article, "'My Mother's Keeper': The Effects of Parentification on Black Female College Students," along with a participant from the study in their article. 

Jun 06 2016

31mins

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Rank #4: Relationship Matters 94 “A labor of love? Emotion work in intimate relationships

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Rebecca M. Horne (University of Toronto, Canada) discusses her research on emotional labor, gender, and the type of work that sustains relationships. Posted June 2019. Read the associated article here.

May 28 2019

17mins

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Rank #5: Relationship Matters

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Dr Geva Shenkman discusses his fascinating research comparing the personal growth and basic needs satisfaction in relationships of heterosexual and lesbian mothers.

May 30 2017

15mins

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Rank #6: Neuropsychiatry: reclaiming organic illness for psychiatry

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It has been said that when the organic basis of a mental disease is understood, it ceases to be psychiatry. Discovery of the spirochaete and penicillin emptied the asylums of the victims of tertiary syphilis; understanding the brain’s electrochemical networks delivered epilepsy to neurology; while advances in immunology promise to transform incurable schizophrenia into eminently curable autoimmune encephalitis.

Jul 30 2018

9mins

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Rank #7: Autism Matters Podcast Number 21: Women and Girls on the Autism Spectrum

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Robyn Steward interviews guest editors, Will Mandy and Meng-Chuan Lai about their special issue on women and girls on the autism spectrum.

Date of posting: July 2017

Jul 24 2017

17mins

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Rank #8: PWQ: Coping Strategies as Moderators of the Relation Between Individual Race-Related Stress and Mental Health Symptoms for African American Women

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Author Tawanda Greer discusses her article with Thema Bryan-Davis, President of the Society for the Psychology of Women, and PWQ Editor Jan Yoder.

Aug 08 2017

21mins

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Rank #9: Relationship Matters Podcast Number 82 “Through your partner’s eyes: Perspective taking tempers optimism in behaviour predictions”

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Relationship Matters Podcast Number 82 “Through your partner’s eyes: Perspective taking tempers optimism in behaviour predictions”: Dr Johanna Peetz answers questions about her recent research on how considering a partner’s perspective can affect the amount they expect their partner to do for their relationship and how this can improve relationship quality

Jun 11 2018

13mins

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Rank #10: Relationship Matters Podcast Number 71 “What does it mean to feel loved?”

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Relationship Matters Podcast Number 71 “What does it mean to feel loved?”: Dr Saeideh Heshmati of Pennsylvania State University, explains the findings of her recent study on individual and shared opinions on what makes people feel loved using cultural consensus theory

Oct 13 2017

17mins

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Rank #11: Relationship Matters Podcast Number 58 “Self-disclosure to parents in emerging adulthood: Examining the roles of perceived parental responsiveness and separation-individuation ”

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Relationship Matters Podcast Number 58 “Self-disclosure to parents in emerging adulthood: Examining the roles of perceived parental responsiveness and separation-individuation ”: Dr Crystal Jiang from City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong discusses self-disclosure of emerging adults to their parents and it relates to their process of separation and becoming an individual

Jun 22 2016

16mins

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Rank #12: Relationship Matters Podcast Number 59 “People they are a changin’: the links between anticipating change and romantic relationship quality”

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Relationship Matters Podcast Number 59 “People they are a changin’: the links between anticipating change and romantic relationship quality”: Anika Cloutier from Queen’s University, Ontario, Canada discusses how people’s relationships change over time; and how anticipating a future where themselves and their partner either both change in a similar way, or both stay the same can enable a higher relationship quality between them

Jul 11 2016

16mins

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Rank #13: Relationship Matters 86: “The narrative psychology of love lives”

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Dr William L. Dunlop (University of California, Riverside) discusses narrative identities and his research on how love-life narratives can indicate personality traits and authenticity  in the romantic domain. Posted October 2018. Read the associated article here.

Sep 27 2018

17mins

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Rank #14: Relationship Matters podcast 83 “How many hours does it take to make a friend”

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Relationship Matters podcast 83 “How many hours does it take to make a friend”: Dr Jeffery Hall contextualises and explains his study on the amount of time it takes to increase closeness with people

Jun 28 2018

17mins

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Rank #15: PWQ: Negotiating Femininity: Gender-Relevant Primes Improve Women’s Economic Performance in Gender Role Incongruent Negotiations

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PWQ Editor Mary Brabeck speaks with author Julia Bear about her article, "Negotiating Femininity: Gender-Relevant Primes Improve Women’s Economic Performance in Gender Role Incongruent Negotiations," co-authored by Linda Babcock.

Mar 02 2017

17mins

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Rank #16: Psychotherapy and Neurobiology – an interview with George Halasz

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The revolutionary impact of Freud’s empirically derived and intuitively developed psychoanalysis generally obscures his early attempts to ground his invention in a secure neuroscientific framework. In the June issue of the Australasian Psychiatry podcast I speak with Dr George Halasz, child psychiatrist, about how rapid advances in neuroscientific understanding over the last thirty years is starting to change psychoanalytic theory and practice. Using his background in trauma therapy as an example, Dr Halasz describes how an awareness of the dynamic systems within and between clinician and patient in therapy can improve outcomes and reduce conscious and unconscious distress for both parties.

Oct 04 2017

19mins

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Rank #17: Clinical management of ultra-rapid metabolism of antidepressant medication

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In the August 2016 issue of the Australasian Psychiatry podcast, Dr Andrew Amos speaks with Professor Gordon Parker about his article on the clinical management of patients who are ultra-rapid metabolisers of antidepressant medications. Professor Parker starts with the premise that much of the heterogeneity of response to antidepressant medication is due to the poor reliability of diagnosis, and proposes that antidepressant medication is particularly indicated for patients with melancholic forms of depression. Professor Parker suggests we should be sensitive to the possibility of ultra-rapid metabolism in patients with melancholic depression who report no clinical benefit and no side effects of medication at higher doses, including in young patients experiencing their first episode. He describes his approach, which includes the use of tricyclic antidepressants both because of the existence of serum level assays, and for their greater efficacy in some patients with depression. Finally, Professor Parker discusses the use of stimulant medications and ketamine in patients with treatment-resistant depression, and issues a challenge to the profession to improve the evidence base for treatment-resistant depression and ultra-rapid metabolisers in particular.In the August 2016 issue of the Australasian Psychiatry podcast, Dr Andrew Amos speaks with Professor Gordon Parker about his article on the clinical management of patients who are ultra-rapid metabolisers of antidepressant medications. Professor Parker starts with the premise that much of the heterogeneity of response to antidepressant medication is due to the poor reliability of diagnosis, and proposes that antidepressant medication is particularly indicated for patients with melancholic forms of depression. Professor Parker suggests we should be sensitive to the possibility of ultra-rapid metabolism in patients with melancholic depression who report no clinical benefit and no side effects of medication at higher doses, including in young patients experiencing their first episode. He describes his approach, which includes the use of tricyclic antidepressants both because of the existence of serum level assays, and for their greater efficacy in some patients with depression. Finally, Professor Parker discusses the use of stimulant medications and ketamine in patients with treatment-resistant depression, and issues a challenge to the profession to improve the evidence base for treatment-resistant depression and ultra-rapid metabolisers in particular.

Jul 27 2016

19mins

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Rank #18: An interview with Frances Dark on peer workers in the mental health setting

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A driving force in the emergence of the Recovery movement has been the increasing sense of agency of people with mental illness in their own return to mental health. Peer worker programmes leverage individual experiences of successful recovery from mental illness to provide patients with exemplars to help them find their own paths back to health. The October podcast features Dr Frances Dark, Clinical Director of the Rehabilitation Academic Clinical Unit, Metro South Health, Brisbane, who talks about developing long-stay psychiatric rehabilitation services primarily staffed by peer workers. Dr Dark believes that peer workers should not displace allied health professionals in treating mental illness, but can complement their clinical skills, with powerful roles in promoting engagement, autonomy, and communication. While acknowledging the specific circumstances of peer workers, Dr Dark reports that in practice perceived problems such as the possibility of peer workers becoming mentally unwell are most appropriately handled using the same principles and mechanisms as with other health workers, particularly self-care, work-place flexibility, and professional responsibility.

Oct 04 2017

20mins

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Rank #19: Volatility in daily relationship quality

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Apr 03 2017

16mins

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Rank #20: Relationship Matters

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Dr Gentiana Sadikaj from McGill University, Montreal discusses her recent article on how dominant behaviour can cause a negative effect on the partner by and then how that can affect the relationship quality.

Apr 03 2017

15mins

Play