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When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

A podcast covering the build up to, breakout of and consequences of various conflicts in history. Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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30YearsWar #26: The Disunited Provinces

Matchlock is a historical fiction series set during the Thirty Years' War, beginning in 1622, when Matthew Lock lands in Europe to investigate the brutal murder of his parents. Order your copy of Matchlock and the Embassy by clicking here. In today's episode we look at the story of the Dutch in a time of peace and tranquility - or at least, peace - and ask what went wrong. The problem was that the United Provinces were not so united after all, and were in fact beset by divisions on numerous levels. A state which had been forged in war, and which found its identity in war, suddenly had to cope without war, and it was harder than expected. Between 1610-19, the Dutch Republic was struck by a new religious dispute which was soon folded into the political and societal tensions. The two camps became inflamed, and with the Spaniard always the subject of suspicion, it became clear that blood would have to be paid, for the crisis to pass... **DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW THESE LINKS!** 1) To support the podcast financially in return for some extra audio content, check out Patreon! 2) To find a community of history friends, look at our Facebook page and group! 3) To keep up to date with us, follow us on Twitter! 4) For everything else, visit our website! 5) For merchandise including tees and mugs, all you have to do is click here! 6) Get our new Thirty Years War book, For God or the Devil! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

35mins

13 Jan 2021

Rank #1

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WDF 28.0: The Second Anglo-Dutch War I

The drought is over, the dust is settling and a new war is on the horizon. Who are we? We are When Diplomacy Fails, and we are back to our roots looking at the series of wars and events which occurred during the era of Louis XIV - the Sun King. In this episode we intro you all to the first of our twelve parter (I know!) on the Second Anglo-Dutch War, a critical war for the history of the era in its own right, and one which sets us up for so much of what's to come, so let's begin, in a makeshift room on some dingy island (and I'm not talking about my desk!). Thankssssssss!Remember history friends, you can help this podcast and ensure that this is where history thrives! Support us by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow me on Twitter @wdfpodcastAnd visit our official website www.wdfpodcast.com Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

38mins

31 Jul 2016

Rank #2

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30YearsWar: 17th Century Warfare Episode 6

We return with part 6 of our series on 17th century warfare, and in this episode we have something very special for you guys – an examination of the sick man of Europe, before he was sick, but when he was certainly maligned and looked down upon. For some time, it has been supposed that the Ottoman Empire could not keep pace with Western Europe, and that her eclipse by the West European powers in the 1700s was an inevitable, rational process which can be partially explained by the Turk’s reluctance to accept new technological advances. Yet, as we’ll learn here, this generalisation against the Turks is as unfair as it is unfounded. The Ottoman Empire possessed one of the most advanced organisational and administrative systems in the world at the dawn of the 17th century. She was equipped with some of the most educated military minds, and had on site some of the best facilities for producing the weapons of war which he soldiers needed. This was not a sick man of Europe, nor did the patient show any signs of illness – far from it. The Turk was the envy of the continent thanks to the immense successes and accomplishments of her Sultans and soldiers, and it was partially to explain away these successes that the more unflattering myths about the Turk’s barbarity did the rounds.In this episode we’ll learn what the Turk was truly capable of, and why he made use of certain weapons which were shown to be obsolete in other parts of Europe. The Military Revolution, as we’ll see, was not the blanket theory which could be universally applied to all – advancements in technology did not arrive evenly to the continent, and even when they did, these advancements were affected by the circumstances on the ground, and issues as simple as whether Tartars were more comfortable firing a technically obsolete bow, than picking up a more ‘modern’ carbine. So I hope you’ll join me here history friends, while we examine the Turk’s prowess in the detail it deserves. Thanksss! SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available!... Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

31mins

2 Aug 2018

Rank #3

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WDF Rem* 1: The Franco-Prussian War I

Here we are! The first remastered episode of our special and the official beginning of a very exciting project from WDF. Now that we're finally here I can shut up about it all, and introduce you back into the world which we were last a part of...5 years ago. Thankssss for making all of this possible history friends, and remember to support us at WDF is you are as excited as I am to begin!Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast and find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

33mins

21 May 2017

Rank #4

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30YearsWar: 17th Century Warfare Episode 7

The fire by rank tactic used by Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries had surprising beginnings, as we learn in this episode. While key military thinkers like Maurice of Nassau in the Netherlands played a pivotal role in changing how infantry were viewed and used on the battlefield, it is highly likely that he acquired inspiration for these ideas not just from Europe’s Ancient past, but also from Asian innovations many thousands of miles away.The adoption of the musket on a wide scale and its incorporation into the infantry-based armies of the 1500s was a process made into legend by the Spanish, who achieved their supremacy on the continent with the tercio formations – pikemen squares surrounded by musketmen, with a secure centre and the capacity to meet any challenge, be it man or beast, on the field. This tercio formation granted the Spanish stunning victories, from Pavia in 1525, all the way up to Nordlingen in 1634. Yet, as a tactic, it was gradually dying, to be replaced by Maurice of Nassau’s innovations in the fire by rank approach. In this tactic, men would line up as a group of musketmen several ranks deep. The front rank would discharge their weapons and march to the back of their unit to reload, with the second rank following suit, and so on. In this way, a constant volley of fire would be poured into the enemy – in this case the vaunted Spanish tercio formations, with devastating results. This tactic harnessed the potential for superior firepower which the musket could boast, and it ensured that further innovations were possible. In this episode we trace the development of this idea from its unlikely beginnings, and in the next episode, we will see it in action for the first time. Make sure you join us for this fascinating look at European warfare in the 17th century history friends! Thanksss! SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our... Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

35mins

2 Sep 2018

Rank #5

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Korean War #22: Crossing the Rubicon

You should know about our new sponsor - onlinegreatbooks.com! To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to...  https://intellectuallinearprogression.com/when-diplomacy-fails/?level=1&discount_code=dip Episode 22: Crossing the Rubicon looks at the moment where the North invades, and the different pieces fall into place for some, and fall apart for others. At 4AM on 25th June 1950, the buildup, all the preparation, all the pressuring and all the lies produced their anticipated outcome. In more force than anyone could have expected, North Korea invaded its Southern neighbour and instigated what appeared to be a catastrophic collapse in Southern defences. Syngman Rhee, it seems, had been right to warn his American allies of his country's vulnerable state.The ROKA proved useless in the face of the North's veteran troops, many of whom had served in the Chinese Civil War for several years.We follow from the perspective of Paik Sun Yup, who began the war as a Colonel, he would end it as one of the highest ranking military personnel in Korea. His war was only beginning, The nightmare for Korea was only beginning, as the war which has flummoxed and fascinated people for many decades since erupted across the 38th parallel.**Music used:"My Pillow and Me", by Lizzie Myles in 1923. Available:http://freemusicarchive.org/…/Antique_Phon…/My_Pillow_And_MeSign up to our NEWSLETTER for the latest news and deals! In April and May subscribers get 20% OFF my Thirty Years War book, so don't delay! sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a0d49eec863c/wdfpodcast Want to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF15 to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, shop, website, source materials and Patreon below.History Podcasting Platform:http://www.wdfpodcast.com/history-podcasting-platform/Official shop where you can pick up all manner of podcast-related goodies: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/shop/Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsVisit the website: http://www.wdfpodcast.com/Visit the blog: Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

39mins

6 May 2018

Rank #6

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Versailles #50: Deliberations on Reparations

At long last, we turn our attention to the controversial issue of reparations. Perhaps no issue at the Paris Peace Conference, and no single tenet of the Treaty of Versailles has been the source of as much controversy as the question of how much Germany should pay to answer for its crimes of launching the Great War, yet in this first of an unofficial two-parter, we will learn that the conventional narrative of reparations is very far removed indeed from the reality. The eternal wisdom of John Maynard Keynes, we will discover, was far from so universal as historians have come to believe, and our impression of where the peacemakers went wrong and who was to blame over the reparations question is, I will explain, unfairly and unjustly skewed. It's time to set the record straight, or as straight as we can make it, so if you're eager for a revisionist take on 1919's most controversial question, look no further than our 50th episode! ********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

41mins

27 Mar 2019

Rank #7

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30YearsWar: 17th Century Warfare Episode 8

After covering the adoption of a revolutionary new musket drill by Maurice of Nassau in the late 1590s, in this episode we come to the point where all of these innovations would be put to the test, so I hope you’re ready to listen in, as the full horrors of constant barrages of lead on the human body were felt to their full effect for the first time in Western Europe, in the relatively unknown Battle of Nieuwpoort, in July 1600. This episode provides a key example of what made the Military Revolution so unique and important for European warfare. From Maurice’s display at Nieuwpoort, so many other innovations would follow, including the adoption of its key lessons by other powers, and the perfecting and adding to them by others, like the Swedish and French. Before long, the drill would be the staple means by which infantry would take the field, and training these men and giving them the platform they needed to succeed would become the occupation of all competent commanders in early modern Europe. Make sure you tune in here to see what made innovators like Maurice of Nassau tick, and why he was so important for his time. We also get a window into how the Dutch government organised its military, and what they were up against in the sheer professional supremacy of the Spanish tercio system. I hope you enjoy it history friends! Make sure you spread the word – thanksss!***Click here to pre-order the book | Click here to sign up on Patreon from as little as $2 a month and access awesome goodies! | Click here to find our dedicated section of the website | AND #1) Follow us on Twitter #2) Like us on Facebook #3) Join the history friends group! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

49mins

9 Sep 2019

Rank #8

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BismarckRise #1: 'I, Bismarck' [1815-1851]

Want to skip the queue and access all episodes of BismarckRise right NOW? OF COURSE YOU DO! Click here for moreUnsure of what's going on? Read this blog post for more information on BismarckRise.In this episode, the first of eight, we explore the life of a young Otto von Bismarck, and assess the different events, influences and individuals who moved through his life. It’s a personal story, but it’s also a story about the unassuming, you could even say unremarkable, beginnings, of a man who would one day dominate Europe. At this stage in his life, only those three qualities – intelligence, ambition and energy – were palpable, but there was also something raw within the young Otto that suggested a great potential, if only it could be harnessed…We also see Bismarck living through some incredibly significant events. Born in the final moments of the Napoleonic Wars, Bismarck seemed to come of age during the 1848 revolutions, which to his contemporaries appeared like the beginning of the end of Old Prussia, to be replaced by a new radical liberal iteration, beholden to the mob. This did not pan out, but we still see young Otto here present himself to the authorities in Berlin, and try to make himself useful. His suggestions to the royal family on how to deal with the crisis would make him a firm enemy in Augusta, wife of Prince Wilhelm, for life. By this stage though, Bismarck’s introduction to politics had already been complete – he had acquired a seat in the United Diet in 1847, so this experience of revolution was like the cherry on top of a political education without parallel in Prussian history.In spite of his late blooming, only discovering what he really wanted to do at age 32, Bismarck quickly made up for lost time. This confrontational, coarse, but unmistakably vibrant and dynamic individual managed to charm his peers, with the result that he gained a seat in the Landtag at Berlin in 1849. Plying his trade for the next few years, Bismarck established a reputation for himself as a reactionary, a conservative Junker of the old school, when in reality, he was most interested in furthering his own career, and laying his hands on some real power. Power, for Bismarck, as he quickly discovered, was more intoxicating than anything else he had ever known, and he needed to have more. To the surprise of nobody but Bismarck, the King did not grant him a ministerial post, but he did not pass him over either. Amidst troubling diplomatic crises, the relationship between Prussia, Austria and Russia seemed destined to change. Bismarck, noted the King, could be immensely useful under these circumstances, and the King very much intended to use him.In spring 1851, Bismarck learned that his first posting of serious significance would be in Frankfurt, the capital of German cooperation and political intrigue, where representatives from the German princes gathered. It was here that Bismarck would land first. His superiors intended for Frankfurt to be his political education – here was a chance as well to put their enthusiastic, energetic subject to good use. A friendship with Austria, so it appeared, could be best achieved with this mad Junker, who had voiced his support of the Austrian partnership in the past. And so off Bismarck went to Frankfurt, but before long, his personal role began to change. Far from willing to kowtow to Vienna, Bismarck quickly discovered just how restrictive the Austrian domination of Germany had become for Prussia. And then the idea began to germinate within him – an idea which would distinguish him from his peers, launch his political career, and redefine the Prussian Kingdom. So long as Austria reigned supreme, Bismarck believed, Prussia could never achieve its full... Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

3hr 15mins

30 Apr 2020

Rank #9

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1916 - Episode 16: 'The Beginning of Ireland New'

In our final episode (and also our longest!) we examine the complex series of events which led Ireland to exterminate its Irish Parliamentary Party in the 1918 General Election, to replace it with the Sinn Fein Party - the political arm of the 1916 Rising, and the vehicle through which revolutionary violence would dominate Ireland for the next few decades. It is a winding listen, tying together a number of issues as well as posing a series of controversial, challenging questions to you guys, so I hope you all enjoy it, and let me know what you think! MUSIC: 'The Mother' & 'James Connolly' by Patrick Cassidy from the album '1916'. I DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO THIS SONG/ALBUM.Remember history friends, you can help this podcast and ensure that this is where history thrives! Support us by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsFollow me on Twitter @wdfpodcastAnd visit our official website www.wdfpodcast.com Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

50mins

15 Jun 2016

Rank #10

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Korean War #15: Ignorance Is Bliss

Episode 15: Ignorance Is Bliss examines the behaviour of the US towards its South Korean ally. Since the American strategy was now to lure North Korea into attacking, we'll see in this episode exactly how determined the Truman administration was to chronically underfund and jeopardise the security of Seoul. Ignoring the protests, concerns and urgency professed even by some of its own State Department staff, the US behaved as though it had no concept of what was happening in South Korea in spring 1950, and that it did not know that the Soviets were now actively supporting the North as it prepared to invade. If the North planned to invade, Washington planned to make South Korea as juicy a target as possible for its neighbours. Only in this way would the conflict necessary for the realisation of NSC68 be achieved. So Syngman Rhee was faced with complaints from Washington that inflation in his country was rife, and that he would have to sort this out before sufficient military aid would be provided. Where Rhee protested that his state was desperately vulnerable in light of rumours of Northern rearmament, Acheson(pictured here with Truman) stalled, and presented the South Korean regime as too beligerent to be trusted with greater defensive capabilities, a claim which has mostly stuck to this day.In the height of his desperation, the uninformed American ambassador to South Korea, John J Muccio, would attempt to travel to Washington and make his case. As he planned his trip, it was difficult to believe that the Truman administration could indeed be this grossly incompetant and ignorant of the situation. As we'll see, this conventional explanation for why the US ignored the repeated warnings doesn't hold up particularly well under scrutiny. It's time to challenge what you think you know, and I'm here as always to help you do that!*Music Used: "Gloomy Sunday", by Paul Whiteman, released in 1936. This iconic tune was made use of during the Hungarian revolts. It is indeed a gloomy tune, but also one of immense quality, so I hope you enjoy it! You can find it free here: https://archive.org/details/PaulWhitemanwithJohnnyHauser 1956 - The Eventful Year is now LIVE! Head on over to its new home and check out this new, originally researched series, and listen to over two hours of free content now! If you like what you hear, why not join up on Patreon for $5 a month, and get access to the complete story 1956 provides: a rich and immensely detailed saga spanning 35 episodes!? You'll be investing in WDF's future, feasting on all the best exclusive content to come, AND have access to the XTRA feed's extensive back catalogue! Thanksss!For 1956: https://www.acast.com/1956eventfulyearTo access it all, head over to the XTRA feed: https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails/postsWant to grab yourself some quality, stylish head/ear phones and get 15% off? Use the code WDF to avail of this special offer and start your listening journey with When Diplomacy Fails like never before! See: https://www.sudio.com/eu/Want to support this podcast in other ways, as we meander through the Korean War? Check out the following links to our social media, website, source materials and Patreon below.Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207Twitter: https://twitter.com/?lang=enSupport us financially on Patreon and access an ad-free episodes ($2 per month) and an hour of extra content ($5 per month): Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

38mins

23 Mar 2018

Rank #11

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30YearsWar: NEW Introduction

We're back! At long last, after a lot of confusing scheduling and weird decisions, WDF is finally ready to introduce to you what we have planned for the next few years. It is an investigation of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) like you've never seen it before, and I couldn't be more excited to begin! Listen in here for a rundown of what we've done so far since our too eager release back in May 2018, and what we plan to do going forward. For those confused with what this all means, and why there's so many introduction episodes floating around, look no further than this episode, which is made up of explainers, disclaimers, and probably a few complainers! Thanksss!Click here to pre-order the book | Click here to sign up on Patreon from as little as $2 a month and access awesome goodies! | Click here to find our dedicated section of the website | AND #1) Follow us on Twitter #2) Like us on Facebook #3) Join the history friends group! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

40mins

9 Sep 2019

Rank #12

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WDF Rem* 5.5: TALK The Seven Years War

Just as we did 5 years ago for episode 5, here us 5 times 5 people talk 5 times about 5 different fives. So you are paying attention? Good! You'll have to, as Sean and I TALK about the Seven Years War in my personal favourite episode together. Check out this classic now, brought to you because some things are too good to leave behind!Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

39mins

29 May 2017

Rank #13

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WDF Rem* 6: The War of the Spanish Succession I

We return to the late 17th/early 18th century with arguably one of the most infamous examples of early modern warfare EVER! It is a fascinating conflict, and since we all know Louis XIV that much better this time around, I figured it was only right to do it justice. I hope you enjoy the journey - thanksss!Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

35mins

30 May 2017

Rank #14

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WDF Rem* 12: The Crimean War I

The Crimean War was the ultimate showdown between Britain and its 19th century adversary in Russia, with France thrown in for good measure too! The story is a fascinating one, which shaped European relations and ideas about Russian power for years to come, so I hope you enjoy our new take on it! Thanksss!Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

31mins

14 Jun 2017

Rank #15

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Korean War #1: America Dawns

Episode 1: America Dawns, looks at the situation which greeted US policymakers between 1945-50. As an episode it serves as a good roundup of all we've learned in the Cold War Crash Course, but a simple summary episode THIS IS NOT!We delve into the mindset behind the Truman Doctrine, ask what the goals of NATO were and investigate how Washington viewed Soviet moves by examining their additional policies and proclamations.We also look at the problems which faced the US in the late 1940s, including the mindset which insisted that there was no money in the kitty to fight the Soviets, and that Washington would have to cut its cloth to suit its pocket. This attitude towards defence expenditure and confrontation with the forces of communism would change in time, but not yet. The three losses - of China, of its status as the sole nuclear power, and of Mao Zedong himself to the Soviet Union, after the Treaty of Friendship was signed in February 1950 - all influenced American policymakers to consider a radical change in policy, and they settled upon a blandly named report called NSC68.What was meant by Chinese Titoism? And what had American policymakers hoped to achieve by cosying up to the Chinese communists? Could they really expect to change the perspective of the Chinese, when the Soviets loomed so large in Mao's estimation? Make sure you join us to find out the answer to this question as well as a host of others. Our first episode, at long last. I hope you enjoy it.Remember history friends, you too can support the podcast and join our lovely community in the process!Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsPodcast/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1856652614380207/Twitter: https://twitter.com/wdfpodcastPatreon: www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFailsWebsite: www.wdfpodcast.comBibliography: www.wdfpodcast.com/source-materials/ Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

39mins

15 Jan 2018

Rank #16

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Alt-History: What If Gavrilo Princip Missed? #1

Welcome history friends, as we launch into a little sideshow I cooked up for you all. This is the first in a chunky 2-parter series on alternative history, where we build a different world in the style you're used to, having asked the question - what would have happened if Gavrilo Princip missed, rather than actually successfully assassinated the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand? Using all I've gathered in my years studying the First World War and the July Crisis in particular, I give you my answer, so I hope you enjoy it! Over the course of the episode we will look at several threads, such as the change in Serbian government and increasing tensions provoking reactionary policies across the Balkans, it remained to be seen whether the European alliance system would save the peace or help destroy it. Find out here, and remember to catch part 2!Support the show!->Visit the homeland for this new project!->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month!->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month! ->Follow WDF on Twitter! ->Join the Facebook group!->Subscribe on iTunes! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

1hr 6mins

22 Dec 2018

Rank #17

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WDF Rem* 15: The Boxer Rebellion I

Returning with better pronunciations and ideally a better analysis, we're back with the Boxer Rebellion, which occurred in a tumultuous summer in 1900. Here we examine the circumstances which led to such an event, which itself contributed significantly to the worsening international situation, and played a key part in the increasing Anglo-Russian rivalry. Have a listen and let me know what you thought. Thankssss!Remember also history friends, to make sure that you BEFIT! Visit our website www.wdfpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter @wdfpodcast Find us on Patreon by going to www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

35mins

18 Jun 2017

Rank #18

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30YearsWar: 17th Century Warfare Episode 5

Our series on 17th century warfare continues with a look at how French armies were constituted, and how their attitudes towards certain tactics changed. We begin with an examination of the massive increases of European armies across the board, but we soon refine our focus, and examine the machinations of King Henry IV of France (r. 1594-1610), who made the most of new theories in infantry and cavalry tactics. The story is by no means a straightforward one of consistent, sensible progression. Instead, it is a tale of hard knocks and tough lessons, which inculcated within the French military thinkers a respect for new methods of making war, and a willingness to experiment and take ideas they appreciated from their Dutch and Swedish neighbours. Such developments say a great deal about the spread of new military theories in the West, as much as they provide a clear example of the interconnectedness of Europeans, who served in each other’s armies and swapped drill manuals in military institutions. It’s a story which I’m sure you’ll find fascinating, so come and join me for this latest instalment of 17th century warfare! Thanksss!***SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

37mins

6 Jul 2018

Rank #19

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Korean War #31: Laying Down The Gauntlet

Episode 31: Laying Down The Gauntlet looks at the other side of the coin and how the Americans reacted to the developing war in the late summer of 1950. MacArthur attempted to follow War Plan SL-17, which stipulated that a landing at Inchon should take place in response to a Northern surge down the peninsula, but problems existed in this plan, and MacArthur faced a conundrum throughout July 1950 as he tried to adapt to the curious nature of the communist advance. Pusan, it was clear, would be the holding action, and the test of allied mettle before reinforcements arrived.  What was also clear in the Truman administration was that the time was right to present its first of many appeals to the public and to Congress. The policy aim of NSC 68 and the requirements within the defence budget necessitated that the President acted fast and did not hesitate to request, in consideration of the urgent state of affairs in Korea, some emergency funding increases. In addition, the apparently contradictory policy of appeasement towards the Chinese was adopted. This, as we’ll see, was pursued only because of the momentary vulnerability of the defenders at Pusan – if the Chinese intervened now, in late July-early August, all would surely be lost. Far better it would be to see the Chinese involve themselves AFTER the reinforcements had arrived and triumphs had been achieved. This, indeed, was the outcome eventually reaches. Little did Mao Zedong know, while he cautiously welcomed the allied approaches and watched the conflict unfold on the peninsula somewhat nervously, that all was proceeding according to the plans of everyone but his own.**Music used: “While They Were Dancing Around”, by Eddie Morton released in 1914. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Eddie_Morton/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04282015/While_They_Were_Dancing_Around_-_Eddie_Morton SPONSORS1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com!Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts... Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

34mins

5 Aug 2018

Rank #20