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Justin Gest

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 11 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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How Immigration Affects the Soul of America (and its GDP) with Justin Gest

The Rational Middle

On this week's episode is Justin Gest, author and Associate Professor of Policy and Government, George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Justin and a team of demographers and economists have released a study on GDP growth scenarios based on immigration policy. We also discuss one of the principle approaches to addressing immigration hesitancy of Americans and how advocates can better explain the opportunities to those who oppose immigration based on personal economic fears.

34mins

5 May 2021

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Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Politics and Polemics

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

41mins

28 Jul 2017

Similar People

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Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Public Policy

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and identity were synonymous with the blue-collar work these people did. Today they live in a country that they feel is no longer “for them.” They feel powerless, as minority groups do.In The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016), Assistant Professor of Public Policy Justin Gest examines how this group has been relegated to the political margins in their respective countries, and what the consequences have been for their identity and political behavior. Gest focuses on Youngstown, Ohio and East London, which he considers to be two “post-traumatic” cities, or places that have experienced major economic loss without sufficient replacement, and have never fully recovered. The story, of course, is the decline of manufacturing, and Gest reveals the significant political impacts of this devastating transformation. Based on research conducted before the Brexit vote and the campaign and election of Donald Trump, this enlightening book provides much-needed explanations for how these key events came to be embraced by a large swath of their country’s populations. Most importantly, it does so by meeting this underprivileged group where they live, and letting them voice their concerns. People from all political backgrounds ought to listen. Richard E. Ocejo is associate professor of sociology at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is the author of Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017), about the transformation of low-status occupations into cool, cultural taste-making jobs (cocktail bartenders, craft distillers, upscale mens barbers, and whole animal butchers), and of Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), about growth policies, nightlife, and conflict in gentrified neighborhoods. His work has appeared in such journals as City & Community, Poetics, Ethnography,and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He is also the editor of Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork (Routledge, 2012) and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Metropolitics, Work and Occupations, and the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

40mins

28 Jul 2017

Episode artwork

Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in British Studies

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and identity were synonymous with the blue-collar work these people did. Today they live in a country that they feel is no longer “for them.” They feel powerless, as minority groups do.In The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016), Assistant Professor of Public Policy Justin Gest examines how this group has been relegated to the political margins in their respective countries, and what the consequences have been for their identity and political behavior. Gest focuses on Youngstown, Ohio and East London, which he considers to be two “post-traumatic” cities, or places that have experienced major economic loss without sufficient replacement, and have never fully recovered. The story, of course, is the decline of manufacturing, and Gest reveals the significant political impacts of this devastating transformation. Based on research conducted before the Brexit vote and the campaign and election of Donald Trump, this enlightening book provides much-needed explanations for how these key events came to be embraced by a large swath of their country’s populations. Most importantly, it does so by meeting this underprivileged group where they live, and letting them voice their concerns. People from all political backgrounds ought to listen. Richard E. Ocejo is associate professor of sociology at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is the author of Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017), about the transformation of low-status occupations into cool, cultural taste-making jobs (cocktail bartenders, craft distillers, upscale mens barbers, and whole animal butchers), and of Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), about growth policies, nightlife, and conflict in gentrified neighborhoods. His work has appeared in such journals as City & Community, Poetics, Ethnography,and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He is also the editor of Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork (Routledge, 2012) and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Metropolitics, Work and Occupations, and the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

40mins

28 Jul 2017

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in American Studies

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and identity were synonymous with the blue-collar work these people did. Today they live in a country that they feel is no longer “for them.” They feel powerless, as minority groups do.In The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016), Assistant Professor of Public Policy Justin Gest examines how this group has been relegated to the political margins in their respective countries, and what the consequences have been for their identity and political behavior. Gest focuses on Youngstown, Ohio and East London, which he considers to be two “post-traumatic” cities, or places that have experienced major economic loss without sufficient replacement, and have never fully recovered. The story, of course, is the decline of manufacturing, and Gest reveals the significant political impacts of this devastating transformation. Based on research conducted before the Brexit vote and the campaign and election of Donald Trump, this enlightening book provides much-needed explanations for how these key events came to be embraced by a large swath of their country’s populations. Most importantly, it does so by meeting this underprivileged group where they live, and letting them voice their concerns. People from all political backgrounds ought to listen. Richard E. Ocejo is associate professor of sociology at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is the author of Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017), about the transformation of low-status occupations into cool, cultural taste-making jobs (cocktail bartenders, craft distillers, upscale mens barbers, and whole animal butchers), and of Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), about growth policies, nightlife, and conflict in gentrified neighborhoods. His work has appeared in such journals as City & Community, Poetics, Ethnography,and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He is also the editor of Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork (Routledge, 2012) and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Metropolitics, Work and Occupations, and the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

40mins

28 Jul 2017

Episode artwork

Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Political Science

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and identity were synonymous with the blue-collar work these people did. Today they live in a country that they feel is no longer “for them.” They feel powerless, as minority groups do.In The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016), Assistant Professor of Public Policy Justin Gest examines how this group has been relegated to the political margins in their respective countries, and what the consequences have been for their identity and political behavior. Gest focuses on Youngstown, Ohio and East London, which he considers to be two “post-traumatic” cities, or places that have experienced major economic loss without sufficient replacement, and have never fully recovered. The story, of course, is the decline of manufacturing, and Gest reveals the significant political impacts of this devastating transformation. Based on research conducted before the Brexit vote and the campaign and election of Donald Trump, this enlightening book provides much-needed explanations for how these key events came to be embraced by a large swath of their country’s populations. Most importantly, it does so by meeting this underprivileged group where they live, and letting them voice their concerns. People from all political backgrounds ought to listen. Richard E. Ocejo is associate professor of sociology at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is the author of Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017), about the transformation of low-status occupations into cool, cultural taste-making jobs (cocktail bartenders, craft distillers, upscale mens barbers, and whole animal butchers), and of Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), about growth policies, nightlife, and conflict in gentrified neighborhoods. His work has appeared in such journals as City & Community, Poetics, Ethnography,and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He is also the editor of Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork (Routledge, 2012) and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Metropolitics, Work and Occupations, and the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

40mins

28 Jul 2017

Episode artwork

Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Peoples & Places

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of…

39mins

28 Jul 2017

Episode artwork

Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Politics & Society

In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of…

39mins

28 Jul 2017

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Ep157 - Justin Gest

Mixed Mental Arts

Since ISIS captured the attention of the West by beheading foreign journalists, the news media has been obsessed with covering them. Since 9/11, some of the most eye-catching terror-related stories have been about Western muslims who have joined the ranks of international terrorist organizations. That storyline has come to the fore with the coverage of ISIS. In this episode, we ask Justin Gest, assistant professor at George Mason University and author of Apart: Alienated and Engaged Muslims in the West, to give us a sense of what life is like for young Muslim men living in Europe and to give us a sense of why these young men turn to terror and what society as a whole can do to engage them in Western society so they aren’t driven to want to tear it down.Apart: Alienated and Engaged Muslims in the West is available on Amazon. Visit Justin Gest online

57mins

29 Sep 2014