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Best Investing Podcasts

Updated Weekly

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The best podcasts on investing. For anyone interested in the stories in the investing industry, whether it's an interview with Ray Dalio or Ed Thorp to the writer of The Big Short. This topic includes the most fascinating stories from all the best investors. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Read more

The best podcasts on investing. For anyone interested in the stories in the investing industry, whether it's an interview with Ray Dalio or Ed Thorp to the writer of The Big Short. This topic includes the most fascinating stories from all the best investors. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Cover image of Best Investing Podcasts

Best Investing Podcasts

Updated Weekly

Read more

The best podcasts on investing. For anyone interested in the stories in the investing industry, whether it's an interview with Ray Dalio or Ed Thorp to the writer of The Big Short. This topic includes the most fascinating stories from all the best investors. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

All Episodes

All Episodes

Capital Allocators: Annie Duke - Improving Decision Making [Capital Allocators, EP.39]

Feb 13 2019
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Annie Duke is a renown public speaker and decision strategist. For two decades, she was one of the top poker players in the world, including winning a World Series of Poker bracelet and the $2 million winner-take-all WSOP Tournament of Champions. Her study of the science of smart decision-making began with a National Science Foundation Fellowship, which she used study Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.  Among her charity work and television appearances, Annie was a runner-up to Joan Rivers on Celebrity Apprentice, during which she raised $700,000 for Refugees International. She is a natural teacher and storyteller with an active mind that constantly searches for accurate truth. I highly recommend Annie’s new book, Thinking in Bets, which comes out this week. In her life after poker, she is a featured speaker, writes a newsletter and a blog, and advises companies on improving their decision-making process. Have a look at her website, annieduke.com, for more information. Our conversation discusses Annie’s path from an Ivy League education to professional poker, the nature of a bet, how we form beliefs, why we make bad decisions, and what we can do to improve our decision-making process. Towards the end, we also talk about bankroll management, poker faces, and advice she would give the President on how to make better decisions.   For more episodes go to CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com/Podcast Write a review on iTunes Follow Ted on twitter at @tseides Join Ted’s mailing list at CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com   Show Notes 2:30 – Annie’s path through the poker world  6:05 – Her transition into teaching and the lesson of tilt  11:57 – How do you apply the concepts of betting and gambling broadly to decision making  13:35 – What is it about the science of the brain that prevents us from making good decisions             14:17 – Stumbling on Happiness             14:19 – Dan Gilbert Ted Talk             15:44 – Kluge: The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind  18:50 – Motivated reasoning  21:10 – Is there anything we can do to fix our decision-making biases (wanna bet)  28:05 – Other devices to improve our decision-making  32:29 – Value of a decision group             33:16 – Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction 34:00 – Mertonian Norms, CUDOS  40:27 – Mental time travel (Marty McFly from Back to the Future)             42:55 – Jerry Seinfeld – Night Guy vs Morning Guy  44:55 – Applying these tools and the parallels between poker and investing  48:59 – Reading poker faces             49:21 – Joe Navarro books             49:34 – Joe Navarro Psychology Today  52:50 – What advice would Annie give President Trump in terms of improving his decision-making process  53:52 – Favorite sports moment  55:45 – What teaching from Annie’s parents has most stayed with her  56:08 – What information does Annie read that a lot of people might not know about that is valuable             56:18 – The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution             56:19 – Why Evolution Is True 56:58 – What life lesson does Annie wish she knew earlier in life 58:28 – Looking ahead, what advice would Annie give herself today from a ripe old age

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Masters in Business: Interview With Daniel Kahneman: Masters in Business (Audio)

Feb 13 2019
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August 4 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Daniel Kahneman, who is a professor emeritus of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University and a fellow of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. This commentary aired on Bloomberg Radio.\u0010\u0010(Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.)

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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP 104 : Billionaire Carl Icahn - A Rare Look Behind the Scenes w/ Mark Stevens, author of King Icahn (Business Podcast)

Feb 13 2019
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One of the most misunderstood celebrity investors in the world is Billionaire Carl Icahn. Luckily for our audience, our guest Mark Stevens was one of the few people to forge a relationship with the unique and un-empathetic investor. In this episode you'll learn about: -What “greenmail” is and how Icahn basically got paid for not taking over companies -How to conduct an activist approach to investing -Why Carl Icahn always wins in a negotiation -If Carl Icahn is truly a bear in the current market conditions Click here to get full access to our show notes.

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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP164: Billionaire Ray Dalio's new book: Principles (Business Podcast)

Jan 10 2019
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Billionaire Ray Dalio is one of the biggest names in finance. He achieved this recognition due to Bridgewater Associates stellar performance over numerous decades of operations.  For instance, during the 2008 financial crisis, the US Stock market was down -50% and Dalio's Pure Alpha fund was up 9.4%. His company has become the largest hedge fund in the world and it trades in almost every market around the world. In this week's episode, we read Ray's new book, Principles. The book was recently released on Amazon in October, and it's quickly rose to numerous bestseller rankings. Click here to get full access to our show notes. In this episode, you'll learn:Why you can have anything but not everything in lifeWhy 15 uncorrelated bets is the holy grail of investingRay Dalio’s 5 step process to achieve your goals in lifeThe personal advice Ray Dalio gave to PrestonAsk The Investors: Why is inflation so low when the economy is booming View Ray Dalio's Book on Amazon

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Invest Like the Best: Danny Moses - The Big Short and Beyond - [Invest Like the Best, EP.34]

Jan 10 2019
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My guest this week is Danny Moses, who was directly in the middle of the biggest trades in market history, chronicled by Michael Lewis in his book the Big Short. Danny was the head trader on the Frontpoint team led by Steve Eisman, which was one of a small group of firms that figured out, in real time, the dire situation with mortgage-backed securities during the financial crisis, and how to build a portfolio to bet against the U.S. housing market. We cover his part in the Big Short story, but also lots of other interesting ground, including the state of sell-side research and financial markets. I love conversations with traders because they live and breathe market risk. You’ll be able to see why quickly in this great conversation with Danny Moses.   For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to http://investorfieldguide.com/danny For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag

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Capital Allocators: Michael Mauboussin – Active Challenges, Rational Decisions and Team Dynamics (Capital Allocators, EP.36)

Jan 10 2019
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Michael Mauboussin currently is the Director of Research at BlueMountain Capital, a multi-billion dollar hedge fund and asset manager.  He spent the majority of his professional career thinking and writing about decision making, behavior and complex systems, with long stints at Credit Suisse and nearly a decade alongside Bill Miller at Legg Mason.  Michael has been an Adjust Professor at Columbia Business School for 24 years. Our conversation covers Michael’s early career, the paradox of skill, academic research more favorable to active management, decision-making, optimal size and composition of teams, unsettling features in the market, data analysis in sports, career risk, the Santa Fe Institute, and Michael’s new research on the horizon. Every time I speak to Michael I come away thinking better and feeling smarter, and this time was no exception. For more episodes go to CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com/Podcast Write a review on iTunes Follow Ted on twitter at @tseides Join Ted’s mailing list at CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com   Show Notes 1:48 - What was Michael like as a kid 2:26 – How Michael found his way to Wall Street 6:18 – His start as an analyst in consumer and packaged goods 7:52 – Why there are no .400 hitters in active management and the paradox of skill             8:15 – Full House: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin 14:26 – Why have there been massive flows into index funds over the last 3-4 years 15:44 – Academic research supporting active management             16:09 – Mutual Fund Flows and Performance in Rational Markets             16:25 - On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets             22:52 - Indexing and Active Fund Management: International Evidence 23:12 – Do these trends also apply in global markets             24:01 - The Mutual Fund Industry Worldwide: Explicit and Closet Indexing, Fees, and Performance 25:22 – What has Michael discovered in his new role at Blue Mountain through his new credit lens             27:49 – Amazon, the world’s most remarkable firm, is just getting started 30:02 – What are some of the lenses that Michael uses when dealing with allocators 35:02 – How does Michael go about interviewing for a team while taking into account their biases             36:19 – The Rationality Quotient: Toward a Test of Rational Thinking 36:37 – Biggest risks in the markets today             37:31 – Banks to Funds: Have Some Leverage With That Deal 39:45 – Liquidity in the markets 41:26 – What’s most interesting to Michael about the merging of data and sports             41:34 – The Success Equation: Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing             43:42 – Big Data Baseball: Math, Miracles, and the End of a 20-Year Losing Streak             44:32 – Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won 45:57 – Psychological bias in sports  46:16 - Malcom Gladwell Podcast: The Big Man Can't Shoot 47:23 – Psychological bias in investment management             47:40 – Scott Malpass on Capital Allocators 48:44 – Michael’s work with the Santa Fe institute             53:08 – Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies 54:40 – Next big piece of research Michael is working on             57:53 – The End of Theory: Financial Crises, the Failure of Economics, and the Sweep of Human Interaction 57:59 – Should Michael be using his skills elsewhere in the context of a world where so many advocate for just indexing             1:01:36 – C

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The Tim Ferriss Show: #264: Ray Dalio, The Steve Jobs of Investing

Jan 10 2019
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Ray Dalio (@raydalio) grew up a middle-class kid from Long Island. He started his investment company Bridgewater Associates out of a two-bedroom apartment at age 26, and it now has roughly $160 billion in assets under management. Over 42 years, he has built Bridgewater into what Fortune considers the fifth most important private company in the U.S. Along the way, Dalio became one the 100 most influential people in the world (according to Time) and one of the 100 wealthiest people in the world (according to Forbes). Because of his unique investment principles that have changed industries, aiCIO Magazine called him "the Steve Jobs of investing." Ray believes his success is the result of principles he's learned, codified, and applied to his life and business. Those principles are detailed in his new book Principles: Life and Work. In this interview, we cover a lot, including: How Ray thinks about investment decisions, how he thinks about correlation, etc. The three books he would give to every graduating high school or college senior How he might assess cryptocurrency And much, much more... Enjoy! This podcast is brought to you by Four Sigmatic. I reached out to these Finnish entrepreneurs after a very talented acrobat introduced me to one of their products, which blew my mind (in the best way possible). It is mushroom coffee featuring chaga. It tastes like coffee, but there are only 40 milligrams of caffeine, so it has less than half of what you would find in a regular cup of coffee. I do not get any jitters, acid reflux, or any type of stomach burn. It put me on fire for an entire day, and I only had half of the packet. People are always asking me what I use for cognitive enhancement right now -- this is the answer. You can try it right now by going to foursigmatic.com/tim and using the code Tim to get 20 percent off your first order. If you are in the experimental mindset, I do not think you'll be disappointed. This podcast is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, "If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?" My answer is, inevitably, Athletic Greens. It is my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body and did not get paid to do so. As a listener of The Tim Ferriss Show, you'll get 30 percent off your first order at AthleticGreens.com/Tim. Show notes and links for this episode can be found at tim.blog/podcast.

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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP 120 : Warren Buffett's Clone: Mohnish Pabrai - Part I (Business Podcast)

Jan 10 2019
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In this episode, you'll learn: How Mohnish accumulated business knowledge from the age of 11 Why Mohnish is one of the very best and respected investors in the value investing community What special advantages people like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett had to become so successful How Mohnish set up and ran a business like Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Why investing is not a team sport Click here to get full access to our show notes.

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Masters in Business: Interview With Jack Bogle: Masters in Business (Audio)

Jan 10 2019
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March 11 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Jack Bogle, Founder of the Vanguard Group, Inc., and President of the Bogle Financial Markets Research Center. He created Vanguard in 1974 and served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer until 1996 and Senior Chairman until 2000. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

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Invest Like the Best: Sam Hinkie – Data, Decisions, and Basketball - [Invest Like the Best, EP.88]

Jan 10 2019
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I came across this week’s guest thanks to the overlap of three passions of mine: data informed investing, value creation, and basketball.  Sam Hinkie worked for more than a decade in the NBA with the Houston Rockets, and then most recently as the President and GM of the Philadelphia 76ers. He helped launch basketball's analytics movement when he joined the Houston Rockets in 2005, and is known for unique trade structuring and a keen focus on acquiring undervalued players. Today, he is also an investor and advisor to a limited number of young companies in which he feels his experience can improve outcomes.  At one point in our conversation, Sam mentions that he tracked success via future financial outcomes, so I did some research and found many interesting stats about the 76ers surrounding Sam’s tenure. When he took over the franchise, it was 24th in ESPN’s franchise rankings, and today it is 4th. This is the result of an impressive crop of young talent—players like All-Star Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons—which resulted in large part from unconventional decisions Sam and his team made.  While I’m sure these estimates are imperfect, Forbes estimated the 76ers value at around $418M when Sam took over and $1.2B a few months ago. NBA teams in general have grown in value, so a lot of that appreciation is obviously “beta,” but given that the 76ers had the top percentage growth number more recently of any team, some of it is “alpha,” too. While we can’t parse the exact amount, it seems his unique approach to building a team clearly created some large amount of current franchise equity value. And it looks like the dividends from those decisions will compound for many years to come.  While basketball was where Sam plied his talents in the past, his approach is more elemental. It is about finding great people, using data, and structuring decisions that create the possibility of huge returns, be they financial or otherwise. I don’t know what Sam will do next, be it investing in companies, running one, or taking over another team, but I know it will be fun to watch.  Please enjoy this unique episode with Sam Hinkie.  For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag   Books Referenced Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent is Less Work and More Fun Than You Think   Links Referenced International Justice Mission   Show Notes 3:24 – (First Question) Advantages of having a long view and how to structurally harness one 6:08 – Using technology to foster an innovative culture             6:18– Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History 10:16 – Favorite example of applied innovation from Sam’s career 11:34 - Most fun aspect of doing data analytics early on the Houston Rockets 13:38 - Is there anything more important than courage in asymmetric outcomes 14:29 – How does Sam know when to let the art of decision making finish where the data started 16:29 - Pros and cons of a contrarian mindset 17:26 – Where he wanted to apply his knowledge in sports when first getting out of school and how his thinking is best applied in the current sports landscape 21:39 – How does he think about trying to find the equivalent of mispriced assets in the NBA 23:12 – Where tradition can be an impediment to innovation 25:07 – What did the team and workflow of the team look like in the front office 27:03 -  The measure of truth in a sports comple

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Masters in Business: Ed Thorp, The Man Who Beat The Dealer and The Market

Jan 10 2019
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Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Ed Thorp, one of the most storied people in finance. A math professor at MIT and UC Ivine, Thorp figured out how to beat Las Vegas at blackjack and baccarat, created statistical arbitrage, and ran a hedge fund that not only beat the market by a wide margin, but never had a losing quarter. He is the author of several books, including "Beat the Dealer" and "Beat the Market"; his latest book is "A Man for All Markets." Thorp tells Ritholtz that the secret to beating the market is having an edge that's specific, definable and mathematical. If you don't, you should be in index funds instead. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

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Invest Like the Best: Michael Mauboussin – Active Asset Management - [Invest Like the Best, EP.02]

Jan 10 2019
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Michael Mauboussin, Managing Director and Head of Global Financial Strategies at Credit Suisse, joins Patrick to discuss the current state of the asset management business, explore all of the stages of the investment process, and what edges might exist for those trying to beat the market.    For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to investorfieldguide.com/mauboussin/ For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast.  Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub Follow Patrick on twitter at @patrick_oshag

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Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom: #8: Raoul Pal on Putting Together the Global Macro Puzzle

Jan 10 2019
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Raoul Pal readily admits he had the good fortune of being in the right place at the right time very early in his investment career. After getting his start during the depths of the recession brought on by the savings and loan crisis, Raoul eventually found himself covering the hedge fund industry for Goldman Sachs. Here he was essentially mentored by the likes of Louis Bacon, Julian Robertson and Paul Tudor Jones. In this conversation, Raoul discusses the lessons he learned during this time, the greatest trade he ever witnessed and how these helped form the global macro investing framework he uses today. He also shares some of his current investment ideas along with what he sees as the most glaring and massive risk to individual investors over the coming decade. For links and charts related to this episode visit TheFelderReport.com.

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Capital Allocators: Annie Duke - Improving Decision Making [Capital Allocators, EP.39]

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Annie Duke is a renown public speaker and decision strategist. For two decades, she was one of the top poker players in the world, including winning a World Series of Poker bracelet and the $2 million winner-take-all WSOP Tournament of Champions. Her study of the science of smart decision-making began with a National Science Foundation Fellowship, which she used study Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.  Among her charity work and television appearances, Annie was a runner-up to Joan Rivers on Celebrity Apprentice, during which she raised $700,000 for Refugees International. She is a natural teacher and storyteller with an active mind that constantly searches for accurate truth. I highly recommend Annie’s new book, Thinking in Bets, which comes out this week. In her life after poker, she is a featured speaker, writes a newsletter and a blog, and advises companies on improving their decision-making process. Have a look at her website, annieduke.com, for more information. Our conversation discusses Annie’s path from an Ivy League education to professional poker, the nature of a bet, how we form beliefs, why we make bad decisions, and what we can do to improve our decision-making process. Towards the end, we also talk about bankroll management, poker faces, and advice she would give the President on how to make better decisions.   For more episodes go to CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com/Podcast Write a review on iTunes Follow Ted on twitter at @tseides Join Ted’s mailing list at CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com   Show Notes 2:30 – Annie’s path through the poker world  6:05 – Her transition into teaching and the lesson of tilt  11:57 – How do you apply the concepts of betting and gambling broadly to decision making  13:35 – What is it about the science of the brain that prevents us from making good decisions             14:17 – Stumbling on Happiness             14:19 – Dan Gilbert Ted Talk             15:44 – Kluge: The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind  18:50 – Motivated reasoning  21:10 – Is there anything we can do to fix our decision-making biases (wanna bet)  28:05 – Other devices to improve our decision-making  32:29 – Value of a decision group             33:16 – Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction 34:00 – Mertonian Norms, CUDOS  40:27 – Mental time travel (Marty McFly from Back to the Future)             42:55 – Jerry Seinfeld – Night Guy vs Morning Guy  44:55 – Applying these tools and the parallels between poker and investing  48:59 – Reading poker faces             49:21 – Joe Navarro books             49:34 – Joe Navarro Psychology Today  52:50 – What advice would Annie give President Trump in terms of improving his decision-making process  53:52 – Favorite sports moment  55:45 – What teaching from Annie’s parents has most stayed with her  56:08 – What information does Annie read that a lot of people might not know about that is valuable             56:18 – The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution             56:19 – Why Evolution Is True 56:58 – What life lesson does Annie wish she knew earlier in life 58:28 – Looking ahead, what advice would Annie give herself today from a ripe old age

Feb 13 2019
59 mins
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Masters in Business: Interview With Daniel Kahneman: Masters in Business (Audio)

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August 4 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Daniel Kahneman, who is a professor emeritus of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University and a fellow of the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. This commentary aired on Bloomberg Radio.\u0010\u0010(Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.)

Feb 13 2019
1 hour 6 mins
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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP 104 : Billionaire Carl Icahn - A Rare Look Behind the Scenes w/ Mark Stevens, author of King Icahn (Business Podcast)

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One of the most misunderstood celebrity investors in the world is Billionaire Carl Icahn. Luckily for our audience, our guest Mark Stevens was one of the few people to forge a relationship with the unique and un-empathetic investor. In this episode you'll learn about: -What “greenmail” is and how Icahn basically got paid for not taking over companies -How to conduct an activist approach to investing -Why Carl Icahn always wins in a negotiation -If Carl Icahn is truly a bear in the current market conditions Click here to get full access to our show notes.

Feb 13 2019
34 mins
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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP164: Billionaire Ray Dalio's new book: Principles (Business Podcast)

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Billionaire Ray Dalio is one of the biggest names in finance. He achieved this recognition due to Bridgewater Associates stellar performance over numerous decades of operations.  For instance, during the 2008 financial crisis, the US Stock market was down -50% and Dalio's Pure Alpha fund was up 9.4%. His company has become the largest hedge fund in the world and it trades in almost every market around the world. In this week's episode, we read Ray's new book, Principles. The book was recently released on Amazon in October, and it's quickly rose to numerous bestseller rankings. Click here to get full access to our show notes. In this episode, you'll learn:Why you can have anything but not everything in lifeWhy 15 uncorrelated bets is the holy grail of investingRay Dalio’s 5 step process to achieve your goals in lifeThe personal advice Ray Dalio gave to PrestonAsk The Investors: Why is inflation so low when the economy is booming View Ray Dalio's Book on Amazon

Jan 10 2019
56 mins
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Invest Like the Best: Danny Moses - The Big Short and Beyond - [Invest Like the Best, EP.34]

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My guest this week is Danny Moses, who was directly in the middle of the biggest trades in market history, chronicled by Michael Lewis in his book the Big Short. Danny was the head trader on the Frontpoint team led by Steve Eisman, which was one of a small group of firms that figured out, in real time, the dire situation with mortgage-backed securities during the financial crisis, and how to build a portfolio to bet against the U.S. housing market. We cover his part in the Big Short story, but also lots of other interesting ground, including the state of sell-side research and financial markets. I love conversations with traders because they live and breathe market risk. You’ll be able to see why quickly in this great conversation with Danny Moses.   For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to http://investorfieldguide.com/danny For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 10 mins
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Capital Allocators: Michael Mauboussin – Active Challenges, Rational Decisions and Team Dynamics (Capital Allocators, EP.36)

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Michael Mauboussin currently is the Director of Research at BlueMountain Capital, a multi-billion dollar hedge fund and asset manager.  He spent the majority of his professional career thinking and writing about decision making, behavior and complex systems, with long stints at Credit Suisse and nearly a decade alongside Bill Miller at Legg Mason.  Michael has been an Adjust Professor at Columbia Business School for 24 years. Our conversation covers Michael’s early career, the paradox of skill, academic research more favorable to active management, decision-making, optimal size and composition of teams, unsettling features in the market, data analysis in sports, career risk, the Santa Fe Institute, and Michael’s new research on the horizon. Every time I speak to Michael I come away thinking better and feeling smarter, and this time was no exception. For more episodes go to CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com/Podcast Write a review on iTunes Follow Ted on twitter at @tseides Join Ted’s mailing list at CapitalAllocatorsPodcast.com   Show Notes 1:48 - What was Michael like as a kid 2:26 – How Michael found his way to Wall Street 6:18 – His start as an analyst in consumer and packaged goods 7:52 – Why there are no .400 hitters in active management and the paradox of skill             8:15 – Full House: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin 14:26 – Why have there been massive flows into index funds over the last 3-4 years 15:44 – Academic research supporting active management             16:09 – Mutual Fund Flows and Performance in Rational Markets             16:25 - On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets             22:52 - Indexing and Active Fund Management: International Evidence 23:12 – Do these trends also apply in global markets             24:01 - The Mutual Fund Industry Worldwide: Explicit and Closet Indexing, Fees, and Performance 25:22 – What has Michael discovered in his new role at Blue Mountain through his new credit lens             27:49 – Amazon, the world’s most remarkable firm, is just getting started 30:02 – What are some of the lenses that Michael uses when dealing with allocators 35:02 – How does Michael go about interviewing for a team while taking into account their biases             36:19 – The Rationality Quotient: Toward a Test of Rational Thinking 36:37 – Biggest risks in the markets today             37:31 – Banks to Funds: Have Some Leverage With That Deal 39:45 – Liquidity in the markets 41:26 – What’s most interesting to Michael about the merging of data and sports             41:34 – The Success Equation: Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing             43:42 – Big Data Baseball: Math, Miracles, and the End of a 20-Year Losing Streak             44:32 – Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won 45:57 – Psychological bias in sports  46:16 - Malcom Gladwell Podcast: The Big Man Can't Shoot 47:23 – Psychological bias in investment management             47:40 – Scott Malpass on Capital Allocators 48:44 – Michael’s work with the Santa Fe institute             53:08 – Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies 54:40 – Next big piece of research Michael is working on             57:53 – The End of Theory: Financial Crises, the Failure of Economics, and the Sweep of Human Interaction 57:59 – Should Michael be using his skills elsewhere in the context of a world where so many advocate for just indexing             1:01:36 – C

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 11 mins
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The Tim Ferriss Show: #264: Ray Dalio, The Steve Jobs of Investing

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Ray Dalio (@raydalio) grew up a middle-class kid from Long Island. He started his investment company Bridgewater Associates out of a two-bedroom apartment at age 26, and it now has roughly $160 billion in assets under management. Over 42 years, he has built Bridgewater into what Fortune considers the fifth most important private company in the U.S. Along the way, Dalio became one the 100 most influential people in the world (according to Time) and one of the 100 wealthiest people in the world (according to Forbes). Because of his unique investment principles that have changed industries, aiCIO Magazine called him "the Steve Jobs of investing." Ray believes his success is the result of principles he's learned, codified, and applied to his life and business. Those principles are detailed in his new book Principles: Life and Work. In this interview, we cover a lot, including: How Ray thinks about investment decisions, how he thinks about correlation, etc. The three books he would give to every graduating high school or college senior How he might assess cryptocurrency And much, much more... Enjoy! This podcast is brought to you by Four Sigmatic. I reached out to these Finnish entrepreneurs after a very talented acrobat introduced me to one of their products, which blew my mind (in the best way possible). It is mushroom coffee featuring chaga. It tastes like coffee, but there are only 40 milligrams of caffeine, so it has less than half of what you would find in a regular cup of coffee. I do not get any jitters, acid reflux, or any type of stomach burn. It put me on fire for an entire day, and I only had half of the packet. People are always asking me what I use for cognitive enhancement right now -- this is the answer. You can try it right now by going to foursigmatic.com/tim and using the code Tim to get 20 percent off your first order. If you are in the experimental mindset, I do not think you'll be disappointed. This podcast is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, "If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?" My answer is, inevitably, Athletic Greens. It is my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body and did not get paid to do so. As a listener of The Tim Ferriss Show, you'll get 30 percent off your first order at AthleticGreens.com/Tim. Show notes and links for this episode can be found at tim.blog/podcast.

Jan 10 2019
2 hours 3 mins
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We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast: TIP 120 : Warren Buffett's Clone: Mohnish Pabrai - Part I (Business Podcast)

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In this episode, you'll learn: How Mohnish accumulated business knowledge from the age of 11 Why Mohnish is one of the very best and respected investors in the value investing community What special advantages people like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett had to become so successful How Mohnish set up and ran a business like Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Why investing is not a team sport Click here to get full access to our show notes.

Jan 10 2019
39 mins
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Masters in Business: Interview With Jack Bogle: Masters in Business (Audio)

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March 11 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Jack Bogle, Founder of the Vanguard Group, Inc., and President of the Bogle Financial Markets Research Center. He created Vanguard in 1974 and served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer until 1996 and Senior Chairman until 2000. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 25 mins
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Invest Like the Best: Sam Hinkie – Data, Decisions, and Basketball - [Invest Like the Best, EP.88]

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I came across this week’s guest thanks to the overlap of three passions of mine: data informed investing, value creation, and basketball.  Sam Hinkie worked for more than a decade in the NBA with the Houston Rockets, and then most recently as the President and GM of the Philadelphia 76ers. He helped launch basketball's analytics movement when he joined the Houston Rockets in 2005, and is known for unique trade structuring and a keen focus on acquiring undervalued players. Today, he is also an investor and advisor to a limited number of young companies in which he feels his experience can improve outcomes.  At one point in our conversation, Sam mentions that he tracked success via future financial outcomes, so I did some research and found many interesting stats about the 76ers surrounding Sam’s tenure. When he took over the franchise, it was 24th in ESPN’s franchise rankings, and today it is 4th. This is the result of an impressive crop of young talent—players like All-Star Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons—which resulted in large part from unconventional decisions Sam and his team made.  While I’m sure these estimates are imperfect, Forbes estimated the 76ers value at around $418M when Sam took over and $1.2B a few months ago. NBA teams in general have grown in value, so a lot of that appreciation is obviously “beta,” but given that the 76ers had the top percentage growth number more recently of any team, some of it is “alpha,” too. While we can’t parse the exact amount, it seems his unique approach to building a team clearly created some large amount of current franchise equity value. And it looks like the dividends from those decisions will compound for many years to come.  While basketball was where Sam plied his talents in the past, his approach is more elemental. It is about finding great people, using data, and structuring decisions that create the possibility of huge returns, be they financial or otherwise. I don’t know what Sam will do next, be it investing in companies, running one, or taking over another team, but I know it will be fun to watch.  Please enjoy this unique episode with Sam Hinkie.  For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag   Books Referenced Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent is Less Work and More Fun Than You Think   Links Referenced International Justice Mission   Show Notes 3:24 – (First Question) Advantages of having a long view and how to structurally harness one 6:08 – Using technology to foster an innovative culture             6:18– Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History 10:16 – Favorite example of applied innovation from Sam’s career 11:34 - Most fun aspect of doing data analytics early on the Houston Rockets 13:38 - Is there anything more important than courage in asymmetric outcomes 14:29 – How does Sam know when to let the art of decision making finish where the data started 16:29 - Pros and cons of a contrarian mindset 17:26 – Where he wanted to apply his knowledge in sports when first getting out of school and how his thinking is best applied in the current sports landscape 21:39 – How does he think about trying to find the equivalent of mispriced assets in the NBA 23:12 – Where tradition can be an impediment to innovation 25:07 – What did the team and workflow of the team look like in the front office 27:03 -  The measure of truth in a sports comple

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 6 mins
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Masters in Business: Ed Thorp, The Man Who Beat The Dealer and The Market

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Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Ed Thorp, one of the most storied people in finance. A math professor at MIT and UC Ivine, Thorp figured out how to beat Las Vegas at blackjack and baccarat, created statistical arbitrage, and ran a hedge fund that not only beat the market by a wide margin, but never had a losing quarter. He is the author of several books, including "Beat the Dealer" and "Beat the Market"; his latest book is "A Man for All Markets." Thorp tells Ritholtz that the secret to beating the market is having an edge that's specific, definable and mathematical. If you don't, you should be in index funds instead. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 41 mins
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Invest Like the Best: Michael Mauboussin – Active Asset Management - [Invest Like the Best, EP.02]

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Michael Mauboussin, Managing Director and Head of Global Financial Strategies at Credit Suisse, joins Patrick to discuss the current state of the asset management business, explore all of the stages of the investment process, and what edges might exist for those trying to beat the market.    For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to investorfieldguide.com/mauboussin/ For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast.  Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub Follow Patrick on twitter at @patrick_oshag

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 34 mins
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Superinvestors and the Art of Worldly Wisdom: #8: Raoul Pal on Putting Together the Global Macro Puzzle

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Raoul Pal readily admits he had the good fortune of being in the right place at the right time very early in his investment career. After getting his start during the depths of the recession brought on by the savings and loan crisis, Raoul eventually found himself covering the hedge fund industry for Goldman Sachs. Here he was essentially mentored by the likes of Louis Bacon, Julian Robertson and Paul Tudor Jones. In this conversation, Raoul discusses the lessons he learned during this time, the greatest trade he ever witnessed and how these helped form the global macro investing framework he uses today. He also shares some of his current investment ideas along with what he sees as the most glaring and massive risk to individual investors over the coming decade. For links and charts related to this episode visit TheFelderReport.com.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 3 mins
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