Cover image of How I Built This with Guy Raz
(14950)

Rank #3 in Business category

Business

How I Built This with Guy Raz

By NPR

Rank #3 in Business category

Business
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Guy Raz dives into the stories behind some of the world's best known companies. How I Built This weaves a narrative journey about innovators, entrepreneurs and idealists—and the movements they built.

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Guy Raz dives into the stories behind some of the world's best known companies. How I Built This weaves a narrative journey about innovators, entrepreneurs and idealists—and the movements they built.

iTunes Ratings

14950 Ratings
Average Ratings
13330
805
328
189
298

You didn’t build sh*t

By AndyRomey - Dec 13 2018
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This podcast is absolute drivel, it’s embarrassing that it’s an NPR product and that contributor dollars go toward this. Guy Raz “interviews” these “entrepreneurs”—many of whom are doing and advocating completely awful and livelihood-destroying projects—as if they’re wizards. No tough questions, ever; just “wow!” and “that must have been so hard!” Raz is a naïve bootlicker, or at least he does a great job pretending to be one. More to the point, the podcast pretends that every entrepreneurial success story belongs completely to the businesses’ founders, and not to the dozens, hundreds, or thousands of workers who really made their success possible—the workers who really “built this.” A great podcast if you love corporate propaganda!

So interesting

By Supreme queen💋 - Dec 08 2018
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Great idea for a podcast. Fascinating stories.

iTunes Ratings

14950 Ratings
Average Ratings
13330
805
328
189
298

You didn’t build sh*t

By AndyRomey - Dec 13 2018
Read more

This podcast is absolute drivel, it’s embarrassing that it’s an NPR product and that contributor dollars go toward this. Guy Raz “interviews” these “entrepreneurs”—many of whom are doing and advocating completely awful and livelihood-destroying projects—as if they’re wizards. No tough questions, ever; just “wow!” and “that must have been so hard!” Raz is a naïve bootlicker, or at least he does a great job pretending to be one. More to the point, the podcast pretends that every entrepreneurial success story belongs completely to the businesses’ founders, and not to the dozens, hundreds, or thousands of workers who really made their success possible—the workers who really “built this.” A great podcast if you love corporate propaganda!

So interesting

By Supreme queen💋 - Dec 08 2018
Read more

Great idea for a podcast. Fascinating stories.

Top 10 Episode of How I Built This with Guy Raz

Rank #1: Clif Bar: Gary Erickson

Oct 03 2016
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Gary Erickson asked his mom, "Can you make a cookie without butter, sugar or oil?" The result was Clif Bar, an energy bar named after his dad — now one of the most popular energy bars in the U.S.

Rank #2: Chipotle: Steve Ells

Oct 30 2017
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In 1992, Steve Ells was a classically trained chef working in a high-end restaurant in San Francisco. But after eating a burrito at a local taqueria, he got an idea: to sell burritos and earn enough money to open his own gourmet restaurant. The first Chipotle opened in Denver the following year. Bringing his culinary training to taqueria-style service, Steve Ells helped transform the way we eat fast food. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That," how Alexander Harik turned his mom's recipe for za'atar spread—a fragrant Middle Eastern condiment—into Zesty Z: The Za'atar Company.

Rank #3: Serial Entrepreneur: Mark Cuban

Dec 05 2016
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Mark Cuban made millions off of tech startups, then billions off of stocks — and later went on to buy and revive the Dallas Mavericks. He has come to define the persona of the serial entrepreneur.

Rank #4: TOMS: Blake Mycoskie

May 29 2017
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Blake Mycoskie started and sold four businesses before age 30. But only in Argentina did he discover the idea he'd want to pursue long term. After seeing a shoe drive for children, he came up with TOMS — part shoe business, part philanthropy. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how a long-haired Southern Californian, Chris Healy, co-founded The Longhairs and created special hair ties for guys.

Rank #5: LinkedIn: Reid Hoffman

Jan 15 2018
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In the early 1990s, Reid Hoffman had a vision for the future of the Internet: people would connect through social networks using their real names, and their online lives would be completely merged with their real ones. After several early attempts, he co-founded LinkedIn – a social network focused on jobs and careers. In 2016, the company sold to Microsoft for $26 billion dollars, helping make Hoffman one of the wealthiest and most influential figures in Silicon Valley. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That," how Danica Lause turned a knitting hobby into Peekaboos Ponytail hats, knit caps with strategically placed holes for a ponytail or bun.

Rank #6: Patagonia: Yvon Chouinard

Dec 25 2017
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We're taking a break for the holidays, so we bring you this favorite from the last year: Patagonia. In 1973, Yvon Chouinard started the company to make climbing gear he couldn't find elsewhere. Over decades of growth, he has implemented a unique philosophy about business, leadership and profit. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That", we check back with Brett Johnson of Firedrops — cayenne pepper lozenges.

Rank #7: Ben & Jerry's: Ben Cohen And Jerry Greenfield

Nov 20 2017
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In the mid-1970s two childhood friends, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield decided to open an ice cream shop in Burlington, Vermont. Their quirky little shop packaged and sold unusual flavors like Honey Coffee, Mocha Walnut, and Mint with Oreo Cookies. In 1981, the regional brand spread across the country after Time magazine called it the "best ice cream in America." Today, Ben & Jerry's is one of the top selling ice cream brands in the world. And, like the original founders, the company doesn't shy away from speaking out on social issues. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That", how David Stover and his team at Bureo turn fishing nets into skateboards.

Rank #8: Virgin: Richard Branson

Jan 30 2017
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Richard Branson took a record shop and built it into a label, a bank, an airline, space tourism, and 200 other businesses — all under the name Virgin. But the serial entrepreneur has also had his share of failures.

Rank #9: Barre3: Sadie Lincoln

Sep 11 2017
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Sadie Lincoln and her husband, Chris, had what seemed like the perfect life – well-paying jobs, a house in the Bay Area, two kids. But one day they decided to sell everything and start a new business called Barre3: a studio exercise program that blends ballet with pilates and yoga. Today, Barre3 has more than 100 studios across the country. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how a husband-and-wife team experimented with fruit, spices and vinegar and came up with a gourmet ketchup line called 'Chups.

Rank #10: Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

Aug 21 2017
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When Tariq Farid was 12, he emigrated from Pakistan to the U.S. – and quickly found a job at a local flower shop. Eventually he opened his own shop, which eventually led to the crazy idea to make flower bouquets out of fruit. Edible Arrangements has now bloomed into a franchise of nearly 1300 locations with an annual revenue of $600 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how the Seattle-based clothing company, Five12, is making athletic wear out of used coffee grounds.