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Rank #109 in Kids & Family category

Kids & Family
Christianity

Parent Cue Live

Updated 10 days ago

Rank #109 in Kids & Family category

Kids & Family
Christianity
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Helping parents do family better.

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Helping parents do family better.

iTunes Ratings

127 Ratings
Average Ratings
110
9
6
1
1

A must-listen for all parents!

By Aunt Ray-Ray - Mar 30 2019
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Great content for parents of children of all ages!

Really great stuff

By brittanycalifornia - Jul 14 2018
Read more
Great tips for me as a parent! Keep them coming.

iTunes Ratings

127 Ratings
Average Ratings
110
9
6
1
1

A must-listen for all parents!

By Aunt Ray-Ray - Mar 30 2019
Read more
Great content for parents of children of all ages!

Really great stuff

By brittanycalifornia - Jul 14 2018
Read more
Great tips for me as a parent! Keep them coming.
Cover image of Parent Cue Live

Parent Cue Live

Updated 10 days ago

Rank #109 in Kids & Family category

Read more

Helping parents do family better.

Rank #1: PCL 47: How To Parent A Strong-Willed Child

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How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Sarah Bragg, a content director at Orange who has worked in student ministry for more than 15 years, shares her honest, heartfelt experience in parenting a strong-willed child in today’s episode.

YOUR CUE

  • Notice the good in your child, think of three things you’re grateful for in them, and recall the good memories you have with them to help make the phase a bit easier to handle.
  • Learn how to read your child and understand the ways your child perceives love from you and do them.
  • Remember who you are throughout the difficult journey of parenthood. Make self-care a priority and take time to recharge so you can be a better parent.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Listen to Sarah's Podcast

EPISODE RECAP

There aren’t many words that fully describe what it’s like parenting a strong-willed child.

Difficult? Of course.
Infuriating? Always.
Isolating? Surprisingly so.

As a parent of a child who often argues every decision and pushes your every button, you’ve likely felt overwhelmed by the day-to-day tasks that lay ahead each day. How do you show love to a child who makes your life so hard? How do you parent with wisdom and grace when all you want to do is retreat to a silent place with your drink of choice in your hand?

Naturally unequipped

Sarah Bragg knows all too well the struggle of parenting a child with a difficult personality. The mother of two daughters, nine and seven, remembers being the perfect parent before her kids were born.

Once they arrived, that all changed. She was surprised by how unequipped she was to handle the difficulties of a child, her oldest, who seemed hard to parent from birth. She was angry at her daughter, angry at herself, and angry at all the parenting books that boasted easy solutions.

“Even when I gain little bits of wisdom about who she is, parenting is still hard,” Sarah says. “I fail way more than I succeed.”

The comparison trap in parenting

Sarah found herself, like many of us do, comparing her child and parenting styles to others. She started to gain her identity based on how her child would behave. She started thinking she wasn’t worthy, that she wasn’t enough, that she was a bad parent.

(Does this sound familiar?)

When these thoughts take hold, Sarah encourages parents to stop and notice the good in your child. She also suggests you remember the times when parenting wasn’t difficult, and remind yourself no matter how long this phase lasts, it truly is temporary.

How to keep your sanity

Remembering who you are, Sarah says, is the key to staying grounded when parenting is particularly difficult. Find the parts of you that make you special and do things that feed that side of you. Go on date nights, take quiet time to recharge, step away, even if for a little bit. Retrain the voice in your head to not respond to the guilt and shame of negative self-talk.

Most of all, be encouraged that you are not alone in parenting a strong-willed child — there are so many like you experiencing the same things you are now. Find them, seek comfort in them, and know you are just what your child needs.

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“Two of the most powerful words in the English language are, “Me, too.” – @sarahwbragg
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“No matter how long this phase is…it’s still just a phase.” – @sarahwbragg
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“Comparison is the thief that robs the joy out of parenting.” – @sarahwbragg
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The post PCL 47: How To Parent A Strong-Willed Child appeared first on Parent Cue.

Oct 19 2017
33 mins
Play

Rank #2: PCL 99: How to Find Defiant Joy and Make Life Fun

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GIVEAWAY

Enter the Contest

YOUR CUE

  • Connect and engage with your children. You set the joyful tone for your kids — you should take this responsibility seriously! When engaging with your child, stop and make eye contact with them, put down your phone, and give them a hug out of the blue. These small ways show your kid that you love them and that you’re attentive to them.

EPISODE RECAP

There are so many things we simply accept in our parenting: We accept the sleepless nights, the strained conversations and misunderstandings between us and our kids, the moments everyone tells us we should enjoy but don’t. After awhile, our joy wanes, and with its departure comes more worry, discontentment, and an underlying wonder if this is all parenthood has to offer us.

Is it possible for us to find joy in the mundane, day-to-day tasks of parenthood?

Candace Payne says absolutely.

You may remember our guest, Candace. In 2016, she filmed a four-minute video of her laughing while wearing a Star Wars’ Chewbacca mask. She never intended for the video to be seen by anyone other than her friends, much less become a record holder as the fastest-spread video in YouTube history. And though her video is one to remember, the message Candace shares on her newly-erected platform is one we’re most interested to share with you.

Candace, a wife, mom, author, and speaker spends her days sharing her philosophy on joy, and most particularly, how we can have defiant joy. Defiant joy, Candace shares, is living and acting happily, no matter what life brings you.

As parents, we set the tone for joy in our homes and our children follow our lead. To learn how to shift your perspective from pessimistic to optimistic, how to stay joyful in seasons of change, and other helpful insights, tune in to this week’s episode of the Parent Cue Live podcast!

Got a particular question about parenthood that’s been particularly mind boggling? We want to hear it! Click here.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

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Did you enjoy this episode? Help us spread the word!

Hopefully, this episode has helped you find a few practical ways to “do family better.” If you appreciated it, we would love for you to rate or review the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Your rating and review help get the podcast in front of new parents and listeners. You can also click the buttons below to share this episode on your own social media channels. Thank you for listening!

Rate Us on Apple Podcasts

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The post PCL 99: How to Find Defiant Joy and Make Life Fun appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jan 31 2019
39 mins
Play

Rank #3: PCL 30: Parenting on the Same Page

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Ted Lowe, author of Your Best Us, shares some ideas on how to get on the same page as parents. Whether you’re married, remarried, or a single parent, you’re better when you learn to parent as a team. Discover some conversations to have ahead of time, how to respond in the moment of conflict, and how to show your kids you’re on a united front.

How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

A GIVEAWAY

Follow us on Instagram (@parentcue) for a chance to win a copy of Ted’s new book, Your Best Us!

RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

Ted’s New Book – Your Best Us

QUOTES FROM THIS EPISODE

In the moment of conflict, cooler heads prevail.
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When you dialogue with your spouse daily and date weekly, your dates get better.
Click To Tweet

Kids get the best of us when we allow the best to come out of our spouse.
Click To Tweet

The post PCL 30: Parenting on the Same Page appeared first on Parent Cue.

Mar 30 2017
32 mins
Play

Rank #4: PCL 84: How to Raise Motivated Kids

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YOUR CUE

  • Communicate your family’s values. Your kids can begin to shift from extrinsic motivators to intrinsic ones when you, as a parent, communicate why the task or behavior is important to the family as a whole. When a kid understands they’re a part of something bigger than themselves, your family’s value system becomes their personal value system.

  • Get to know your kids. One of your kids may be extrinsically motivated while the other naturally leans toward intrinsic motivation. Know who your kids are at their core, and it’ll help you tailor how you approach this whole motivation thing. One of your kids may be motivated by things, while the other is motivated by fun and quality time. Notice the differences and act accordingly.

  • Focus on the season you’re in and prioritize accordingly. Ask yourself, “Why am I hyper-focused on my child completing this particular task I’m asking them to do?” Sometimes, we’ll find our requests are selfishly motivated. Take a step back and away from perfection and focus on one thing you can do this week or month to help nurture motivation in your kids.

EPISODE RECAP

As parents, we all want to raise motivated kids who will one day grow up to be adults with great work ethics and values. Sometimes, however, we do things that undermine the ultimate goal of having motivated kids by focusing on short-term outcomes.

On today’s episode, we hear from Dan Scott, a father of four, ranging from high schoolers to an elementary-aged child. Together with our podcast host, Kristen Ivy, the two share their personal stories on what it’s like to motivate kids in the preschool, elementary, middle school, and high school phases. They also discuss how to encourage healthy habits in kids (and discourage unhealthy ones), and how parents should be aware that our hyper-focused requests for that loaded dishwasher or cleaned bedroom to be done perfectly may actually be detrimental to our kids’ motivation growth.

Even more, they answer questions such as:

  • How do I help my kids move from extrinsic motivation (money and other reward-based prizes) to becoming more intrinsically motivated?
  • How do I fairly motivate kids who have different personality types?
  • What are the types of motivators and how can I use them to help my kid grow?

We can’t wait for you to dive into this subject with us. If you found after listening to the podcast that you’ve got another question about parenting, we want to hear it! Click here to ask your question and you might hear it answered on the podcast.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Dan ScottDrive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates UsThe 5 Love Languages of Children: The Secret to Loving Children EffectivelyThe 5 Love Languages of Teenagers: The Secret to Loving Teens Effectively

SHARE THIS

“Parents, ask yourselves, “Am I motivating my child in the moment for my own sake? Or do I have a long-range perspective?” —@kristen_ivy
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“Fun is a motivator for all kids.” —@danscott77 
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“Parents, ask yourselves, “What’s the one thing I want my kids to be motivated to do in this season?” —@kristen_ivy
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The post PCL 84: How to Raise Motivated Kids appeared first on Parent Cue.

Sep 20 2018
32 mins
Play

Rank #5: PCL 98: How to Stay Family-Centered During Busy Life Seasons

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YOUR CUE

  • Be intentional about checking in with your kids. This week, talk intentionally with your kids. What was a win for them this week? What was a loss for them? Get the pulse on where they are now and ask them how you can support them this week.

EPISODE RECAP

None of us parents have our stuff together. While some days are better than others, on many days, most of us are just trying to make it to some far-off point, whether it’s to college, the end of a school break, the weekend, or nap time. Parenthood is hard, and if you ask around, you’ll find most mothers and fathers feel like they’re missing the mark somewhere with their kids.

So how do you stay connected when life gets so busy?

Today’s guest, Jeremy Cowart, seems to be in a perpetual state of busyness. Named the “Most Influential Photographer on the Internet” by Huffington Post, Forbes, and Yahoo in 2014, Jeremy has now added to his résumé: speaker, and founder The Purpose Hotel, a planned global for-profit hotel chain that will serve not-for-profit organizations. On top of that, he’s married with four kids.

If Jeremy can manage staying connected to his family when his work life gets crazy, surely we all can, too, right?

The father of four is quick to admit he doesn’t have it all together. What he does do is take every day one at a time while asking himself, “How do I choose my family today?”

For him, that sometimes means skipping out on those trendy, VIP parties he’s invited to and spending the weekend with his family instead. It might also mean bringing one kid with him while he travels so he can get some one-on-one time with them. Or avoiding electronics at the dinner table to ensure quality time.

Want to hear more helpful ideas from Jeremy? You’ll have to tune-in to today’s episode of the Parent Cue Live podcast to hear more!

Got a particular question about parenthood that’s been particularly mind boggling? We want to hear it! Click here.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Jeremy CowartPurpose HotelParent Cue Store

Did you enjoy this episode? Help us spread the word!

Hopefully, this episode has helped you find a few practical ways to “do family better.” If you appreciated it, we would love for you to rate or review the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Your rating and review help get the podcast in front of new parents and listeners. You can also click the buttons below to share this episode on your own social media channels. Thank you for listening!

Rate Us on Apple Podcasts

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The post PCL 98: How to Stay Family-Centered During Busy Life Seasons appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jan 17 2019
32 mins
Play

Rank #6: PCL 39: Parenting Boys During the Middle School Years – What To Know and What To Do

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Jeff Henderson, lead pastor of Atlanta-area Gwinnett Church joins us to talk about how parenting boys during the middle school years, ages 11-14, is critical to establishing a sense of self-worth and confidence.

How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

YOUR CUE

  • Look for ways to encourage your child and tell them how much you believe in them.
  • Pay attention to clues of God’s will in your child’s life and make them aware of those clues.
  • Before the middle school years arrive, make mental notes of other adults you want to influence your child’s life.

WIN A CHAMPION TRIBES KIT

This giveaway is now closed, but if you’d like to find out more about Champion Tribes visit their website, championtribes.com, or you can email Jeff directly at jeff@championtribes.com.

Email Jeff

EPISODE RECAP

  • The middle years, ages 11-14, is a critical time in a child’s life because according to research, he or she is growing up faster due to technology. Children are seeing and experiencing more — instead of learning life’s lessons from older siblings, they’re learning from Google and social media.
  • If a parent lets this phase slip by without being intentional about it, they’ll see the effects during the high school years.
  • Parents must be intentional to seize opportunities, create moments, and leverage conversations with their middle schoolers.
  • If a son does not receive affirmation from his dad, he’ll grow up seeking affirmation in all of the wrong places.
  • A young man can start living from their father’s affirmation instead of for their father’s affirmation. This creates a grounding force in a man’s life.
  • When Jeff’s son, Cole, was a middle schooler, Jeff and his friend, David Salyers, created the Champion Tribes, a group-based program consisting of five to seven dads with sons between the ages of 11-14. The program exists to help fathers lean into this critical developmental stage, guiding fathers through important conversations about confidence, humility, financial freedom, etc. The program includes a Champion Kit, which includes gifts that reinforce important lessons, and an app.
  • There needs to be a moment in time when a young man can look back on a time he received his father’s affirmation.
  • You can improve the world one father and son at a time if fathers affirm their sons consistently.

QUOTES FROM THIS EPISODE

During the middle school years, a parent’s role shifts from caretaker to coach.
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Giving your child a tribe anchors them and gives them a sense of belonging.
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What you view online shapes you offline.
Click To Tweet

RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

Buy A Champion KitThe Phase Guides

The post PCL 39: Parenting Boys During the Middle School Years – What To Know and What To Do appeared first on Parent Cue.

Aug 17 2017
35 mins
Play

Rank #7: Best Of PCL: Discovering Your Child’s Love Language

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

YOUR CUE

  • Observe your kids. Take some time this week to pay close attention, ask questions, and begin to discover your child’s love language.  Then do something intentional to communicate love in the language they understand best.
  • Check in on your kids regularly. Ask your kids this question, “On a scale of one to 10, how full is your love tank? What can I do to help fill it?”
  • Wrap discipline in your child’s love language. Your child will receive your discipline better when they understand they are loved. When disciplining your child, make sure to use that opportunity to still show them love in the way they understand.

EPISODE RECAP

It’s likely most of us have heard about Dr. Gary Chapman’s book, The 5 Love Languages: The Secret to Love that Lasts, and some of us would dare to reveal its contents helped save our marriages. So naturally, being a podcast to help parents do life better with our kids, we’d jump at the chance to talk to Dr. Chapman about how we can extend that knowledge loving our kids better.

All of our kids experience and show love differently, and for families with multiple kids, it’s likely one kid has a way of understanding love that is different from their sibling. As parents, it’s easy — and sometimes safer — to treat all of our kids the same way, but Dr. Chapman says it’s imperative parents communicate love in the specific way their child understands it.

“The question is not, ‘Do you love your children?’ The question is, ‘Do your children feel loved?” Dr. Chapman asks.

The five ways children and adults interpret love fall into these five categories (or love languages):

  • Words of affirmation
  • Gifts
  • Acts of service
  • Quality Time
  • Physical touch

In today’s episode, Dr. Chapman shares how parents can discover what their child’s love language is, how to discipline while using your kid’s love language, and what parents have to lose if they don’t start showing their kids love in the way they understand it.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

The 5 Love LanguagesThe 5 Love Languages of Children: The Secret to Loving Children EffectivelyA Perfect Pet for Peyton: A 5 Love Languages Discovery BookA Teen's Guide to the 5 Love Languages: How to Understand Yourself and Improve All Your Relationships

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“It’s exceedingly important as parents that we learn to keep the love tank full and that will help our child feel love — that will help them process the rest of life much better.” —@DrGaryChapman
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“If a child feels loved by their parent, they are far more open to their correction and discipline.” —@DrGaryChapman
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“The question is not, ‘Do you love your children?’ The question is, ‘Do your children feel loved?’ —@DrGaryChapman
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“What your kids request of you most often will give you insight into their love language.” —@DrGaryChapman
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The post Best Of PCL: Discovering Your Child’s Love Language appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jul 05 2018
32 mins
Play

Rank #8: PCL 65: How To Recognize When Your Kid is In Crisis

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Dr. Chinwe Williams, a licensed professional counselor, shares ways to identify if your child is experiencing personal crisis on today’s episode of the Parent Cue Live podcast. This will be part one in a two-part series.

YOUR CUE

  • Take your kid’s shift in mood seriously. Our experiences are all different and it’s easy for parents to dismiss their kids’ feelings because whatever they’re upset about seems trivial in the scheme of life. Don’t do this. Your kid’s feelings are very real to them. Talk to them and seek help if the change in behavior persists.
  • Seek support. Having a child struggling with a tough time or mental health issues is difficult to bear for a parent. Find people you trust to confide in who will encourage you and give you sound advice. There is a long road ahead and you’ll need all the support you can get.
  • Therapy doesn’t have to be expensive. The cost might often deter you from seeking counseling. Many companies offer different types of employee assistance programs where the first few counseling sessions are free. Also, do your research — many counselors do pro bono work, making it that much easier to talk to someone.

EPISODE RECAP

Being a parent means you’re no stranger to your kids’ fluctuating moods. Whether they’re a toddler who has just discovered the magical word, “no,” or a teenager who spends more time in angst and sullenness than not, moodiness and kids of all ages seems to go hand in hand.

But parents should be mindful of what’s normal for their kid versus if they’re experiencing a behavior that is out of the ordinary —while your child might appear as if they’re functioning on the outside, their world may be crumbling on the inside.

How do I know if my kid is in a crisis?

Dr. Chinwé Williams, a licensed professional counselor in Roswell, Ga., describes a crisis as any psychological, environmental, or social shift that your kid may have trouble coping with. They may react externally or internally, and for each child, their personal crisis is different.

Parents often miss the signs their child may be experiencing inner turmoil, chalking it up to them simply being a kid. But according to statistics, depression is on the rise amongst kids of all ages and often goes unaddressed and untreated.

The first step in identifying whether your child is experiencing a crisis is simple: Be a student of your child. Get to know them, especially their moods. If their mood and behavior changes, such as separation anxiety and becoming withdrawn from activities they enjoyed in the past, and if it persists for two weeks or more, this is a clear sign something bigger is going on and that you need outside help, whether from a pediatrician, youth pastor, or counselor.

Tune into today’s episode to learn specific signs of crisis based on specific phases in your child’s life and stay tuned for next week’s continuation of this important and timely topic.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

Any sort of distress or crisis comes from psychological, environmental, or social components. Every child will be different. —@drcuwilliams
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When you’re stressed, support helps. —@drcuwilliams
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One of the primary ingredients of effective therapy is relationship. —@drcuwilliams
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The post PCL 65: How To Recognize When Your Kid is In Crisis appeared first on Parent Cue.

Mar 15 2018
41 mins
Play

Rank #9: Best Of PCL: Six Gifts Every Kid Needs

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Reggie Joiner, founder and CEO of The reThink Group, joins hosts, Carlos Whittaker and Kristen Ivy, to talk about six gifts every child needs to feel loved, gain perspective, and be successful in today’s Best Of Parent Cue Live podcast episode.

YOUR CUE

  • Choose one way to love your kids better this week. You probably already do some of the six gifts mentioned, but there are likely areas where you can improve. Choose just one to focus on this week.
  • Make sure you prioritize joy in your house. Playing with your kids shows them you like them. Make sure to have some undistracted fun with them this week! You’ll increase your connection with them when you enjoy spending time with them in recreational companionship.
  • Find another adult you trust to speak into your child’s life. Depending on your kid’s age, you’re probably the last person they want to gain wisdom from. Find another adult you trust to speak the same wisdom you would to your child and ask them to be consistent in your child’s life.

EPISODE RECAP

Given the title of this podcast alone, you probably rolled your eyes thinking, “Great! Let me add six more things to the already growing list of things I’m not doing well as a parent.”

But before you click away from this podcast, let us ease your mind — you’re likely already doing some of these six things with your kids on a daily basis. With intentionality and consistency, you’ll start noticing positive changes in your kids week after week. Even more, these six things, over time, will prove time and time again to your children that they matter not only to you, but to God.

“Ultimately as a parent, we want you to know the ordinary things you do make a difference. You are making history,” Reggie Joiner shares.

The six gifts are:

  • Love
  • Words
  • Stories
  • Fun
  • Work
  • Tribes

To learn the details of how each one of these gifts will give your kids a sense of belonging, hope, and perspective, tune in to this week’s Best Of Parent Cue Live podcast episode!

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Playing For KeepsJ.K. RowlingGrowing Young

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“The ordinary things you do make a difference. You are making history.” —@reggiejoiner
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“The more words you know, the bigger dreams you can imagine.” —@kristen_ivy
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“The words you speak to a kid shape the way they view themselves.” —@kristen_ivy
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“Kids don’t believe you like them if you don’t play with them” —@reggiejoiner
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The post Best Of PCL: Six Gifts Every Kid Needs appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jul 12 2018
35 mins
Play

Rank #10: PCL 31: 5 Adults Every Kid Needs

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Kara Powell, Director of the Fuller Youth Institute, talks about the 5 Adults Your Kids Need. While we as parents are the most important influence in a kid’s life, they need more than just us. You’ll hear why it’s important to widen the circle and how to find the people to invest in your kid’s life.

How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

YOUR CUE

This week, have a conversation with your kid and ask them: “Who is ONE adult you think is cool who you would like to get to know better?” Schedule a time for them to connect!

ENTER TO WIN

We wanted to create a way for parents to be intentional about collecting words from special leaders in your child’s life, like coaches, teachers, or family friends.

We designed a few cards for you to hand to the adults who have influenced your child over time, to prompt them with words to get them started with what to say. Put these cards in a beautiful keepsake box, and give it to your child when they graduate from high school. Whether you start in preschool or at the end of their senior year, you’ll be giving them a gift that will encourage and build them up for years to come.

Download this printable version for free and enter for your chance to win a “With You” box ($30 value) by signing up for our newsletter. We’ll select one random email list subscriber on 5/15/17!

RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

The Sticky Faith Guide for Your FamilyFREE Download - "With You" PDFWith You Box

QUOTES FROM THIS EPISODE

Parents, you are not the only adult your child needs. #widenthecircle
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The post PCL 31: 5 Adults Every Kid Needs appeared first on Parent Cue.

Apr 24 2017
33 mins
Play

Rank #11: PCL 41: The Grown-Up’s Guide to Parenting Teenage Humans

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Josh Shipp, award-winning teen expert featured on MTV, CNN, and in The New York Times, gives parents strategies you can use today to help understand and parent your teenager well.

How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

YOUR CUE

  • Instead of lecturing, try asking your teen questions to gauge their thought process.
  • Be consistent. This is the time your child needs you to be firm the most.
  • Train your teen to handle life’s situations in a controlled environment.

RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

Pre-Order Josh's New BookLearn More About Josh Shipp

QUOTES FROM THIS EPISODE

“Parents of teenagers switch from air traffic controller to coach.” – @joshshipp
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“Every kid is one caring adult away from being a success story.” – @joshshipp
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“Every kid is one decision away from being a statistic.” – @joshshipp
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EPISODE RECAP

Think of a time you were on a roller coaster. The amusement park employee pushed the safety bar down onto your lap, and you proceeded to make sure it worked properly — you wiggled and tugged at it to guarantee it was secure. You weren’t hoping it would fail, but confirming it would hold.

These are the teenage years. It’s your teen’s job to push against you, and it’s your job to hold your ground and be consistent.

Ages 13-19 are likely the trickiest, most nuanced years of your child’s life, and parenting them can leave you feeling frustrated and afraid. And although it’s a time of high stakes, it’s also a time of great opportunity.

How the teenage years shape your child’s future

What sets the teenage years apart from all other phases you’ve encountered so far rests on the decisions they make when you, the parent, aren’t present. During this phase, self-governance is key and it’s important to look for clues in your child’s daily behaviors to understand how they’ll respond in certain situations. If you notice any areas where they need further development, then it’s your job to lean in and help coach them to make sound decisions.

How to lean in

Being a dependable force in your child’s life and being intentional in your parenting doesn’t have to be difficult. Start by asking your teen questions, instead of lecturing, to gauge their thought process, asking questions such as what their thoughts are on current events and how they’d handle hypothetical situations. Ask them what their favorite songs, TV shows, or movies are to understand the deeper narratives of their decisions and thought processes.

The post PCL 41: The Grown-Up’s Guide to Parenting Teenage Humans appeared first on Parent Cue.

Sep 07 2017
35 mins
Play

Rank #12: PCL 56: How To Parent Annoying Kids

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Josh Shipp, award-winning teen expert featured on MTV, CNN, and in The New York TImes, shares honest, helpful tips on how to parent effectively through some of your kids’ most annoying traits.

YOUR CUE

  • Make an honest effort to see the annoying trait positively. It may be hard in the moment, but remember the trait that annoys you most now will likely be what will make them a successful teen and adult. Pause and remind yourself this trait serves a purpose.
  • Nurture the annoying traits. Create boundaries and opportunities for your kids to express these traits in a constructive way.
  • Empathize with parents who are going through the same thing. The best thing you can say to a parent who is annoyed with their child is, “I understand.” Provide some perspective on how their child’s behavior will serve them well in the future.

EPISODE RECAP

Sometimes, kids are annoying.

Admitting that fact doesn’t make you a bad parent, but an honest one. Although you love your kids immensely, it’s difficult not to get overly frustrated and react when they’re pushing buttons you didn’t even know you had. On good days, you’re able to keep your eyerolls and sharp responses inside your head, but on bad days . . . well, we all have them.

Josh Shipp, a father to an eight-year-old son and six-year-old daughter, is all too familiar with annoying kid traits. His son is unbelievably persistent and his daughter is bossy and stubborn. He finds himself regularly annoyed with their behaviors.

But what if instead of getting angered by our kids’ behaviors, we look at them as traits that will help them grow into successful adults? In today’s episode, parents will learn:

Why it’s easy to empathize with a kid’s behavior if it’s similar to their own

  • How to see their kids’ annoying trait from a positive perspective
  • How to empathize with other parents
  • How to preserve annoying traits

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Annoying Traits  –  Strength in Disguise

Bossy  –  Leadership Defiant  –  Determined
Demanding  –  Assertive
Fearful  –  Thoughtful
Impulsive  –  Bold
Liar  –  Creative Writer
Loud  –  Confident
Manipulative  –  Negotiator
Mean  –  Powerful
Quiet  –  Learner
Stubborn  –  Persistent
Sensitive  –  Caring

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“What if a kid’s most annoying trait is their biggest talent in disguise?” — @JoshShipp
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What does it look like to both draw the line with a kid but point to another line available?
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“As adults, it’s easy for us to lose that sense of empathy with a child.” — @Kristen_Ivy
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The post PCL 56: How To Parent Annoying Kids appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jan 11 2018
25 mins
Play

Rank #13: PCL 35: Are Your Kids on Track?

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Family counselors David Thomas and Sissy Goff unpack a few ideas in their latest book Are My Kids On Track about how parents can help their kids reach emotional, social, and spiritual milestones through careful guidance. Addressing the differences between boys and girls, they discuss how parents can help kids develop into resilient and resourceful adults, and become comfortable in the process of growth.

How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

YOUR CUE

Have a conversation with your kids this week and help them name and rate their emotions on a scale from 1 to 10. Depending on what emotions they battle the most, ask what would make them feel angry, anxious, or sad at the highest level 10.

RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

Are My Kids on Track?: The 12 Emotional, Social, and Spiritual Milestones Your Child Needs to Reach

David and Sissy’s Blog – Raising Boys & Girls

A Counselor’s Response to 13 Reasons Why

QUOTES FROM THIS EPISODE

Help your kids develop an emotional vocabulary. Help them find words to define how they feel.
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The goal in parenting isn’t perfection, it’s progress.
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Boundaries create security for kids. They make them feel safer.
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We’re so busy being our kids’ resources they don’t develop resourcefulness.
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SISSY GOFF

Sissy Goff, M.Ed., LPC-MHSP spends most of her days talking with girls and their families, with the help of her counseling assistant/pet therapist, Lucy the Havanese. She has worked as the Director of Child and Adolescent Counseling at Daystar Counseling Ministries in Nashville, Tennessee since 1993, with a Master’s degree from Vanderbilt University. Sissy is the author of eight books including her newest book, Are My Kids on Track?, as well as Raising Girls.  Read more from Sissy at www.raisingboysandgirls.com.

DAVID THOMAS

David Thomas, L.M.S.W., is the Director of Family Counseling at Daystar Counseling Ministries in Nashville, TN, the co-author of six books, including the best-selling Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys and Intentional Parenting and a regular contributor to ParentLife magazine. He and his wife, Connie, have a daughter, and three Wild Things (twin sons and a feisty yellow lab puppy named Owen). You can find David giving parenting tips on the BLOG at www.raisingboysandgirls.com.

CARLOS WHITTAKER

Carlos is an author, speaker, and content creator living in Nashville, TN with his wife Heather and 3 kids Sohaila, Seanna, and Losiah. He is addicted to social media, his wife’s enchiladas, and is determined to have his daughters teach him to land a backflip on the trampoline by the time he is 45. Find out more and read more from Carlos at carloswhittaker.com.

KRISTEN IVY

Kristen is the Executive Director of Messaging at Orange, Director of The Phase Project, and co-author of Playing For Keeps and It’s Just a Phase – So Don’t Miss It. She combines her degree in secondary education with a Master of Divinity and lives with her husband, Matt, and their three children, Sawyer,  Hensley, and Raleigh, in Cumming, GA.

Did you enjoy this episode? Help us spread the word!

Hopefully, this episode has helped you find a few practical ways to “do family better.” If you appreciated it, we would love for you to rate or review the podcast on iTunes. Your rating and review help get the podcast in front of new parents and listeners. You can also click the buttons below to share this episode on your own social media channels. Thank you for listening!

Rate Us on iTunes

The post PCL 35: Are Your Kids on Track? appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jun 22 2017
44 mins
Play

Rank #14: PCL 53: How To Parent Through Divorce

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How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Toni Nieuwhof, a divorce attorney and wife to Pastor Carey Nieuwhof, talks about how parents can navigate divorce while preserving a healthy co-parenting relationship with their former spouse and keeping their kids’ emotional well-being intact in today’s episode of the Parent Cue Live podcast.

YOUR CUE

  • Maintain perspective in the moment. Divorce is hard on everyone involved. Try to maintain empathy for your kids and your former spouse.
  • Keep things familiar. Your kids are likely feeling afraid and vulnerable right now. Keep as many things familiar to them as possible so they can have a better time processing their new normal.
  • Reinforce your love for your children. Tell your kids often that both mommy and daddy love them very much and ensure they feel secure in their relationship with both parents.

EPISODE RECAP

Divorce happens, and it’s something we have to talk about because it’s a reality for many families. In fact, nearly 50 percent of kids in the United States will witness the divorce of their parents while they’re still in the home, studies say. This life challenge —  on top of all of the others you have to deal with — adds an additional layer of difficulty to parenting.

Though divorce wreaks emotional, mental, and sometimes financial havoc on every member of the family, there’s a way to do it well, or, at the very least, as best as you can.

Why focusing on the right things is important

Toni Nieuwhof is very familiar with divorce. As a divorce attorney in Canada, her law firm specializes in what’s called “collaborative practice,” where they help couples through their divorce in a way that preserves their co-parenting relationship and the emotional health of their kids. So, we were looking forward to chatting with Toni about the best ways to handle divorce that won’t add more chaos and emotional turmoil:

Take some time for yourself. Allow yourself the time and space to grieve the loss of your relationship. It’s important to pause divorce negotiations when you’re in the early stages of grief and not make any major decisions when you’re shocked, in denial, and angry. Make sure your basic needs are met by maintaining proper nutrition and rest as best as you can. Get healing for yourself before proceeding.

Focus on the kids. The best way to minimize emotional impact on your kids is to keep in mind that both of you love your child/children and that their best interest should always be top priority.

Don’t rush the process. It’s only natural to feel like you want divorce proceedings to be done as quickly as possible. This often causes more harm to your family and your pockets. Make a temporary nesting arrangement where the kids stay in the home (being in a familiar place with familiar faces will make this easier) and mom and dad take turns moving in and out. The nesting arrangement gives kids additional time and stability to adjust to their new reality. If necessary, make temporary housing arrangements to relieve financial pressure instead of rushing into buying a new home.  

Seek support. Divorce can be isolating. Seek the wise counsel and emotional and spiritual support of others during this time. This would be a great time to speak with your counselor (or find one — your church or divorce attorney should have recommendations) and friends who will be honest with you. Be careful to keep adult conversations as far away as possible from little listening ears.

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“The best way to get through divorce is to focus on the kids.” — @ToniNieuwhof
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“Your kids don’t need you to be perfect, they just need you to be available.” — @ToniNieuwhof
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“The most unifying force is parents’ love for their kids.” — @ToniNieuwhof
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The post PCL 53: How To Parent Through Divorce appeared first on Parent Cue.

Nov 30 2017
32 mins
Play

Rank #15: PCL 83: How To Raise Self-Reliant Kids

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Lifetime Television’s, “America’s Supernanny,” Dr. Deborah Tillman, talks with host, Kristen Ivy, about the skills parents should nurture in their kids to help foster their self-reliance skills.

YOUR CUE

  • Let your kid lose. When our kids are younger, we think it’s cute to let them win games most of the time. Stop doing this. Your kid needs to know there are times they will win, and times they will lose. When your child loses while you’re around, you can help them process these emotions in a constructive, mature (for their age) way. If they don’t ever lose, they’ll always expect to win, which doesn’t happen in real life.
  • Let it go. Release the notion that perfection is right around the corner. It’s not. Allow your kids to do the tasks you want them to do on their own one day, even if it’s not done to your standards. They’re practicing, and practicing leads to growth. Allow your kids to be who they are while they’re learning.
  • Start a gratitude journal. We can think of hundreds of things we’ve done wrong in our lifetimes, but rarely do we celebrate the good things we’ve done. Dr. Tillman suggests parents start a gratitude journal and write down all the things you did well that day. She says when you reflect on the things you do well, you’re bound to repeat them.

EPISODE RECAP

It’s natural for parents to want to protect their children from harm, whether it be from physical, emotional, or relational pain. But too much protection can lead us to raising our kids in the opposite way we truly desire, and if left unchecked, an abundance of protection can cause a lack of self confidence and an inability to handle adversity in our kids.

Dr. Deborah Tillman, a child development and parent educator, and Lifetime’s “America’s Supernanny” has seen countless cases where parents thought they were being a good parent by overly cushioning their children’s fall (even she says she fell victim to this with her now 25-year-old son). She strongly discourages this, in fact, she says parents should let their children fail more. When a child does something on their own, even if they fail, it’s a chance for them to learn and grow.

Now, for the perfectionist parent, this advice will likely cause a mild spasm of some kind—the age-old adage, “If you want something done right, do it yourself,” is a motto most perfectionists live by. Do it to your own detriment, Dr. Tillman warns. Many times, your kids’ growth starts with an inward look at yourself and some self reflection on why you view parenthood the way you do and if that view is indeed what’s best for your child.

Today’s episode is full of helpful—and at times, convicting—advice to help you better parent your child and increase their self reliance. Tune in!

Got a particular question about parenthood or grandparenthood that’s been particularly mind boggling? We want to hear it! Click here.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

A Perfect Pet for Peyton: A 5 Love Languages Discovery Book

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“Self-reliant kids are responsible, can problem solve, and can independently think.” @DeborahLTillman
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“We can show our children the way, but we must allow them to be who they are created to be.” @DeborahLTillman
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It’s easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” Frederick Douglass
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Time to a child is spelled, “L-O-V-E.”  —@DeborahLTillman
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The post PCL 83: How To Raise Self-Reliant Kids appeared first on Parent Cue.

Sep 13 2018
30 mins
Play

Rank #16: PCL 49: How To Pass On Big Faith To Our Kids

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How to listen: iTunes | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Louie Giglio, pastor of Passion City Church in Atlanta, GA, joins us on today’s episode of the Parent Cue Live Podcast to talk about how parents can share a big faith in a big God with their kids.

YOUR CUE

  • Focus on one big idea for the month to reinforce your faith in God. Invite your children into the process of something you’ve been bringing to God. Pray together and talk about ways God is working on that big idea or challenge.
  • Be in awe of God. Your children are watching and learning by the things you do. Show them your wonder of God and how big He is.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Buy "Indescribable: 100 Devotions for Kids About God and Science"

EPISODE RECAP

As Christian parents, we often have an added sense of weight on our shoulders in the upbringing of our children. Not only do we have to worry about our kids’ mental, physical, and emotional development, we also have the added challenge of nurturing the growth of our children’s faith. Overwhelming, right?

But Louie Giglio challenges us to think about this responsibility from a new angle: Instead of focusing on educating your children on the vastness of God, why not show them instead?

Kids rarely remember what their parents teach them, but they hardly forget what they see their parents do. It’s the tiny moments kids observe in the lives of their parents, Louie says, that will matter most to them as they grow older. Your challenge now is to show them your awe of the bigness of God right where you are — whether you’re in the carpool line or in your home office.

Living out our faith as parents, the good and the bad parts, will reinforce in our children that perfect parents on Earth don’t exist, but we have a perfect Father Who sees them, Who knows them, and Who desires to have a personal relationship with them.

To help grow kids’ faith and bridge the gap between God and science, Louie has written a devotional, Indescribable: 100 Devotions For Kids About God And Science. The book combines two of Louie’s popular messages, “Indescribable” and “How Great Is Our God” to reveal the the majesty of God’s creation with scientific findings, photos, and illustrations. We’ll be giving away one copy of the devotional to one lucky winner. Head over to our Instagram account to learn how to enter!

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“The memory may be even more important than the lesson.” — @louiegiglio
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God is knowable. He’s approachable. He’s someone you can have a relationship with.
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“You don’t have big faith unless there’s a big God.” — @louiegiglio
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The post PCL 49: How To Pass On Big Faith To Our Kids appeared first on Parent Cue.

Nov 02 2017
32 mins
Play

Rank #17: PCL 97: Goal Setting and Your Parenting

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YOUR CUE

Ask yourself: “What are some goals I want for my family this month or this year?”

Sometimes, there are goals as simple as getting to bedtime. Other goals are a bit more lofty. Whatever the goal you have for yourself and your family this year, make sure you bring in some reinforcements. Introduce the word “goal” to whomever you do parenting with and get on the same page.

EPISODE RECAP

There’s nothing like the start of a new year to inspire us to become the best version of ourselves. Many of us write a laundry list of goals for the new year and often find ourselves disappointed come December. So how do we stop this endless cycle of unrealistic expectations and disappointment year after year? We’ve enlisted help.

Jon Acuff, New York Times bestselling author and speaker, has tackled this topic in his latest book, Finish: Give Yourself the Gift of Done. Jon says most Americans believe a goal has to be difficult in order for it to count. That’s not true, he says.

So what’s the distinguishing factor between a good goal and a bad goal? Ask yourself this question: What do I hope is the consequence of this goal if it is achieved? The answer, Jon says, will be an instant sign of whether or not the goal matches who you are.

When it comes to our families, we often stop short of setting goals because the day-to-day tasks often keep us with our heads down and focused on what’s directly in front of us. However, goals set for our families help us stay in-tune with the pulse of what’s going on in our family’s daily life and communicates to our kids that they matter.

Also in today’s episode, Jon offers advice to those skeptical about goal setting, how to complete a goal you’ve set, and the importance of fun while setting goals.

Got a particular question about parenthood that’s been particularly mind boggling? We want to hear it! Click here.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Buy NowLearn MoreBuy NowDOWNLOAD

Did you enjoy this episode? Help us spread the word!

Hopefully, this episode has helped you find a few practical ways to “do family better.” If you appreciated it, we would love for you to rate or review the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Your rating and review help get the podcast in front of new parents and listeners. You can also click the buttons below to share this episode on your own social media channels. Thank you for listening!

Rate Us on Apple Podcasts

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The post PCL 97: Goal Setting and Your Parenting appeared first on Parent Cue.

Jan 10 2019
40 mins
Play

Rank #18: PCL 59: How To Talk To Your Younger Child

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Sarah Jensen, founder and educator of KIPP Memphis Preparatory Elementary School, shares her insight on how to effectively and supportively communicate with younger children in today’s episode of the Parent Cue Live podcast.

YOUR CUE

  • Remember your kids are learning in every moment. You’ve had your chance to learn and form your own opinions, now it’s their turn. Your kid has only been on this planet for a few months, so they’re processing absolutely every experience. Give them the space to explore.
  • Take a step back and put yourself in their world. You might think you have the answer to the current problem, but your answer is likely one of many alternatives. Get on your kid’s level and try to see the experience from their view. In this way, you honor their feelings and they feel heard and supported.
  • Experience everything with your child. Instead of focusing on doing things for your child, try doing things with him or her instead. Be curious about them and play with them. Try to meet them where they are as much as possible.

EPISODE RECAP

Trying to communicate with your toddler or preschool-aged child often feels like running full speed into a brick wall, backing up, and doing it all over again. You want so desperately for them to understand the feelings they’re experiencing aren’t that big of a deal, but in the end, your kid’s even more frustrated and you find yourself looking at the clock wishing it was bedtime already.

What if we told you there was a way to not only communicate with your young child but also eliminate some of the frustration that comes along with getting through to them? You only need a few tools in your parenting arsenal to tackle this mission and the main one? Changing your perspective.

Managing your expectations

The way Sarah Jensen, founder and educator of KIPP Memphis Preparatory Elementary School, talks to and understands kids is nothing short of magical. She says the key to not losing your mind while trying to better communicate with your kid is to remind yourself they’re learning in every moment. It’s easy for parents to forget our children have only been on the planet for a few months, so they’re bound to react in a way we deem unnecessary. Instead, we should change our expectations of them.

And what about those times when our kid flings themselves to the floor in a fit of rage in the middle of Target and your reaction to their tantrum is more #parentingfail than #parentgoals? Sarah says we should look at these reactions from our kids as a good sign — they’re communicating with us (albeit loudly), which we should view as healthy and constructive.

Also in this episode, Sarah gives tips on how to communicate effectively while maintaining discipline, what common mistakes parents make when communicating with their kids, and how to build your child’s vocabulary so you can understand each other better. Tune in!

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

KIPP Memphis Preparatory Elementary

Find out more

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

Kids are brand new social beings who are learning in every moment.
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For a child, your voice will likely become their inner dialogue.
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“The way you speak to them is the way they’ll learn to talk to themselves, the way they’ll learn to talk to their future partner, the way they’ll talk to their best friend, and it’s the way they’ll make a friend.” —Sarah Jensen

The post PCL 59: How To Talk To Your Younger Child appeared first on Parent Cue.

Feb 01 2018
34 mins
Play

Rank #19: PCL 86: How to Build Your Kid’s Confidence Through Self-Love

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Eryn Eddy, a social entrepreneur, speaker, and art director, joins host, Kristen Ivy, to talk about how self love radically boosts confidence in our children.  

YOUR CUE

  • Help your kids face the pain of a first failure or rejection. First heartbreaks take root in us. However, if left unconfronted, that rejection starts to alter how we view ourselves. So take the opportunity of your child’s failure or rejection to teach them the importance of acknowledging these challenges instead of leaning away from them. Dealing with them in a healthy way promotes healthy self worth.
  • Learn to love yourself so you can love your children well. If you don’t love yourself wholeheartedly, it will be nearly impossible to have the capacity to love those around you, including your children. Self love begins when you believe you’re worthy of love.
  • Stay present. We often see our children through the lens of what needs to be fixed. Eryn Eddy encourages us to stay in the moment with our kids, and compliment a value you see in them.

EPISODE RECAP

Our kids arguably have it much harder than us in many ways — they’re dealing with stuff now that wasn’t even created when we were their age. Today’s kids’ confidence is often influenced heavily by outside forces we wish we could control but can’t — social media and peer groups. As a result, our kids often feel stressed out and like they can’t measure up.

But us parents know just how critical confidence is to the growing up process, so we’re all intent on raising confident kids. But how?

On today’s episode, we talk to Eryn Eddy, founder of So Worth Loving, a lifestyle clothing brand that aims to remind people they are valuable and worthy of love. Since adolescence, Eryn has had one mission imprinted on her heart — to encourage people to see themselves for who they truly are.

So of course it was only fitting we talk to Eryn about such an important topic as nurturing confidence in our kids, especially as they get older. At the heart of diminished self worth, Eryn says, is when both kids and adults don’t face the pain of their first rejection or failure head on.

You don’t want to miss this relevant, heartfelt episode, parents. If you’ve been wondering how to keep your kids confidence in tact, how to properly handle when your kids do something you don’t agree with, and how to help your kids become the best version of themselves, tune in!

Got a particular question about parenthood that’s been particularly mind boggling? We want to hear it! Click here.

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

So Worth LovingDear BodyParent Cue Live EventParent Cue Live Facebook communityGiveaway

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

If people knew they weren’t alone, they would be able to see themselves as God sees them.”
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“You can’t love another person wholeheartedly until you love yourself.” —@ErynEddy
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“Our children need the message of acceptance and value over and over again.” —@ErynEddy
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“To become better versions of ourselves, sometimes we need to deconstruct.” —@ErynEddy
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“Trust that God is going to create something beautiful out of the chaos.” —@kristen_ivy
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The post PCL 86: How to Build Your Kid’s Confidence Through Self-Love appeared first on Parent Cue.

Oct 04 2018
41 mins
Play

Rank #20: PCL 63: How To Parent Complete Opposite Children

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How to listen: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | SoundCloud | TuneIn

Author, Catalyst Conference speaker, and host of the Parent Cue Live podcast, Carlos Whittaker, is joined by his wife, Heather, to talk about how to parent kids who have different personalities in today’s episode.

YOUR CUE

  • Encourage your kids to process things aloud. See it as an honor that your kids trust you enough to let you in on their thought processes. Stay quiet and listen as they talk aloud their thoughts and feelings. Try not to interrupt and offer advice and wisdom when they’re done expressing themselves.
  • Reinforce the idea that humans make mistakes. Instead of telling your kids there are horrible people in the world, instead, remind them that we’re all humans and sometimes humans make bad decisions. In this way, you can start nurturing in them a sense of empathy toward other people.
  • Teach your kids to see the bigger picture. There is more than one type of person and more than one way of handling a situation. Encourage your kids to see beyond themselves and diversify their way of thinking about the world and how it works.

EPISODE RECAP

There will be moments when you feel like you’ve reached the peak in your parenting. You’ve got the schedule down to the minute, you’ve found the perfect way to discipline your child that actually works, and everything is running like a well-oiled machine.

Then your second child arrives. Then maybe your third. Then everything you thought you knew about kids goes right out the window along with your perfect parenting record.

Once you have more than one kid, you realize there is no parenting formula, and what works for one child in terms of relating to them or discipline may not work for the other. In today’s episode, we’re joined by Carlos and Heather Whittaker who talk about their personal experiences parenting their children, Sohaila, Seanna, and Losiah. In today’s podcast, you’ll learn:

  • Why constantly changing your parenting style is important
  • How to dismantle the lies your kids believe as it relates to their behaviors
  • How to talk to your kids about bullies and tough life situations
  • How to get to the root of people’s behaviors

MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE

Kill The Spider by Carlos Whittaker

QUOTES IN THIS EPISODE

“For every issue a kid has, they’re acting out based on a lie they believe.” —@loswhit
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“You have to keep changing the way you parent even now.” —@loswhit
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VOICES IN THIS EPISODE

HEATHER WHITTAKER

CARLOS WHITTAKER

Carlos is an author, speaker, and content creator living in Nashville, TN with his wife Heather and 3 kids Sohaila, Seanna, and Losiah. He is addicted to social media, his wife’s enchiladas, and is determined to have his daughters teach him to land a backflip on the trampoline by the time he is 45.

KRISTEN IVY

Kristen is the Executive Director of Messaging at Orange, Director of The Phase Project, and co-author of Playing For Keeps and It’s Just a Phase – So Don’t Miss It. She combines her degree in secondary education with a Master of Divinity and lives with her husband, Matt, and their three children, Sawyer,  Hensley, and Raleigh, in Cumming, GA.

Did you enjoy this episode? Help us spread the word!

Hopefully, this episode has helped you find a few practical ways to “do family better.” If you appreciated it, we would love for you to rate or review the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Your rating and review help get the podcast in front of new parents and listeners. You can also click the buttons below to share this episode on your own social media channels. Thank you for listening!

Rate Us on Apple Podcasts

The post PCL 63: How To Parent Complete Opposite Children appeared first on Parent Cue.

Mar 01 2018
32 mins
Play

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