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Society & Culture
Philosophy
Government

Audible Anarchism

Updated 6 days ago

Society & Culture
Philosophy
Government
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A podcast broadcasting Anarchist texts and audiobooks

Read more

A podcast broadcasting Anarchist texts and audiobooks

iTunes Ratings

22 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
1
0
0
0

Thanks

By Gołąbki - Aug 14 2019
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Big fan of this project. Keep up the great work!

Fantastic!

By MoonstruckSJW - Jun 22 2019
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This is an essential podcast for political education and learning. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about Anarchism and Libertarian Socialism!

iTunes Ratings

22 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
1
0
0
0

Thanks

By Gołąbki - Aug 14 2019
Read more
Big fan of this project. Keep up the great work!

Fantastic!

By MoonstruckSJW - Jun 22 2019
Read more
This is an essential podcast for political education and learning. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about Anarchism and Libertarian Socialism!

Listen to:

Cover image of Audible Anarchism

Audible Anarchism

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

A podcast broadcasting Anarchist texts and audiobooks

Rank #1: Mutual Aid - By Errico Malatesta

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Full text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/errico-malatesta-mutual-aid-an-essay

Since it is a fact that man is a social animal whose existence depends on the continued physical and spiritual relations between human beings, these relations must be based either on affinity, solidarity and love, or on hostility and struggle. If each individual thinks only of his well being, or perhaps that of his small consanguinary or territorial group, he will obviously find himself in conflict with others, and will emerge as victor or vanquished; as the oppressor if he wins, as the oppressed if he loses. Natural harmony, the natural marriage of the good of each with that of all, is the invention of human laziness, which rather than struggle to achieve what it wants assumes that it will be achieved spontaneously, by natural law. In reality, however, natural Man is in a state of continuous conflict with his fellows in his quest for the best, and healthiest site, the most fertile land, and in time, to exploit the many and varied opportunities that social life creates for some or for others. For this reason human history is full of violence, wars, carnage (besides the ruthless exploitation of the labour of others) and innumerable tyrannies and slavery.

May 04 2019

11mins

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Rank #2: Post Scarcity Anarchism by Murray Bookchin

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Full essay https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/murray-bookchin-post-scarcity-anarchism

In this series of essays, Murray Bookchin balances his ecological and anarchist vision with the promising opportunities of a “post-scarcity” era. Technological advances during the 20th century have expanded production in the pursuit of corporate profit at the expense of human need and ecological sustainability. New possibilities for human freedom must combine an ecological outlook with the dissolution of hierarchical social relations, capitalism and canonical political orientation. Bookchin’s utopian vision, rooted in the realities of contemporary society, remains refreshingly pragmatic. Bookchin makes a trenchant analysis of modern society and offers a pointed, provocative discussion of the ecological crisis.

Apr 07 2019

39mins

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Rank #3: Army of Altruists by David Graeber

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Full text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/david-graeber-army-of-altruists

David Graeber (1961- ) is an anarchist, anthropologist, and activist who currently holds a professorship in anthropology at the London School of Economics. Graeber has written extensively on theories of value, social theory, direct action, and ethnographic theory. He participated in the Occupy movement and is a member of the Industrial Workers of the World.

In this essay, Graeber links the psychological impulses of bullying--both of bullies and of passive observers of bullying--to structures of power inherent within hierarchical authority. He contends that from a young age, we are socialized to side with bullies and against victims, and we are socialized to see victims as either deserving their punishment or of having the same moral worth as the bullies themselves.

Aug 10 2019

25mins

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Rank #4: Power Corrupts the Best - Mikhail Bakunin

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Full text available here: http://libcom.org/library/power-corrupts-the-best-mikhail-bakunin

Reading Courtesy of fellow youtuber Reddebrek:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyhoKI98zPwE5RkfPq8vh1A

"From the naturalistic point of view, all men are equal. There are only two exceptions to this rule of naturalistic equality: geniuses and idiots." - Mikhail Bakunin

Jul 20 2019

4mins

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Rank #5: Desert by Anonymous, Authors Note and Chapter 1: No (Global) Future

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Full text here:https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/anonymous-desert

Author’s NoteI have written Desert as a nature loving anarchist primarily addressing others with similar feelings. As a result I have not always explained ideas to which I hold when they are, to some extent, givens within many anarchist and radical environmental circles. Hopefully I have written in an accessible enough manner, so even if you don’t come from this background you will still find Desert readable. While the best introductions to ecology and anarchy are moments spent within undomesticated ecosystems and anarchist communities, some may also find the following books helpful — I did.

Peter Marshall, Demanding the Impossible: A History of Anarchism (London: HarperCollins, 2008).

Fredy Perlman, Against His-story, Against Leviathan (Detroit: Black & Red, 1983).

Christopher Manes, Green Rage: Radical Environmentalism and the Unmaking of Civilization (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1990).

Clive Ponting, A Green History of the World (London: Penguin Books, 1991).

Forward!Something haunts many activists, anarchists, environmentalists, many of my friends. It haunted me. Much of our subcultures tell us it’s not there, that we can’t see it, hear it. Our best wishes for the world tell us not to see it. But for many, despite their best efforts — carrying on with the normal activism, the movement building, living both according to and as an expression of their ethics — despite all this, the spectre gains form. The faint image grows more solid, more unavoidable, until the ghost is staring one in the face. And like many monsters of past tales, when its gaze is met — people freeze. Become unable to move. Give up hope; become disillusioned and inactive. This malaise, freezing, not only slows ‘activist workload’, but I have seen it affect every facet of many of my friends’ lives.

The spectre that many try not to see is a simple realisation — the world will not be ‘saved’. Global anarchist revolution is not going to happen. Global climate change is now unstoppable. We are not going to see the worldwide end to civilisation/capitalism/patriarchy/authority. It’s not going to happen any time soon. It’s unlikely to happen ever. The world will not be ‘saved’. Not by activists, not by mass movements, not by charities and not by an insurgent global proletariat. The world will not be ‘saved’. This realisation hurts people. They don’t want it to be true! But it probably is.

These realisations, this abandonment of illusions should not become disabling. Yet if one believes that it’s all or nothing, then there is a problem. Many friends have ‘dropped out’ of the ‘movement’ whilst others have remained in old patterns but with a sadness and cynicism which signals a feeling of futility. Some hover around scenes critiquing all, but living and fighting little.

“It’s not the despair — I can handle the despair. It’s the hope I can’t handle.” [1]

The hope of a Big Happy Ending, hurts people; sets the stage for the pain felt when they become disillusioned. Because, truly, who amongst us now really believes? How many have been burnt up by the effort needed to reconcile a fundamentally religious faith in the positive transformation of the world with the reality of life all around us? Yet to be disillusioned — with global revolution/with our capacity to stop climate change — should not alter our anarchist nature, or the love of nature we feel as anarchists. There are many possibilities for liberty and wildness still.

What are some of these possibilities and how can we live them? What could it mean to be an anarchist, an environmentalist, when global revolution and world-wide social/eco sustainability are not the aim? What objectives, what plans, what lives, what adventures are there when the illusions are set aside and we walk into the world not disabled by disillusionment but unburdened by it?

Oct 06 2019

16mins

Play

Rank #6: Murray Bookchin "Ecology and Revolutionary Thought" - Part 3

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Full text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/lewis-herber-murray-bookchin-ecology-and-revolutionary-thought

Murray Bookchin (1921-2006) was an anarchist and libertarian socialist political theorist, historian, and author. He is perhaps best remembered as a thinker who fused critical ecology with anarchist thought, but his conceptions of democratic confederalism have influenced numerous social and political movements, including the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (also know as Rojava).

In part 3, Bookchin discusses how classical libertarian principles can be combined with ecological thought in order to address the crises inherent to late-stage capitalism.

Jun 01 2019

12mins

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Rank #7: Syndicalism the Modern Menace to Capitalism by Emma Goldman

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Full text here: https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/emma-goldman-syndicalism-the-modern-menace-to-capitalism

This recording is a mirror of a recording by our comrade and fellow youtuber TheAnarchistSpectacle:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmjdp1zvCaLOR4VOrpGz6mA

Aug 03 2019

26mins

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Rank #8: Introduction to Social Ecology and Communalism by Murray Bookchin

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Full text

"Social ecology is based on the conviction that nearly all of our present ecological problems originate in deep-seated social problems. It follows, from this view, that these ecological problems cannot be understood, let alone solved, without a careful understanding of our existing society".

Feb 10 2019

16mins

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Rank #9: Are you an Anarchist? by David Graeber

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Chances are you have already heard something about anarchists and what they are supposed to believe. Chances are almost everything you have heard is nonsense. Anarchists believe human beings are capable of behaving in a reasonable fashion without being forced to. It is really a simple notion. But it’s one that the powerful have always found dangerous.

Jan 08 2019

13mins

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Rank #10: The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula K Le Guin

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Text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/ursula-k-le-guin-the-ones-who-walk-away-from-omelas

On the 22nd of January 2018, Ursula K Le Guin passed away. This is a tribute made by people whose hearts have been touched by her writings.

On youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaO1QA8QL99_eb0XhJI2Fyw

Jan 03 2019

20mins

Play

Rank #11: Murray Bookchin "Ecology and Revolutionary Thought" - Part 1: The Critical Nature of Ecology

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Read the full text: https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/lewis-herber-murray-bookchin-ecology-and-revolutionary-thought

Murray Bookchin (1921-2006) was an anarchist and libertarian socialist political theorist, historian, and author. He is perhaps best remembered as a thinker who fused critical ecology with anarchist thought, but his conceptions of democratic confederalism have influenced numerous social and political movements, including the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (also know as Rojava). In part 1 of Ecology and Revolutionary Thought, Bookchin addresses the environmental catastrophes that have been produced by imperialistic capitalism and the widespread disconnect between humanity and the environment caused by hierarchical social relationships.

May 19 2019

18mins

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Rank #12: The Child and Its Enemies by Emma Goldman

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Full text

Emma Goldman (1869-1940) was an anarchist political theorist, activist, and writer. Her work influenced numerous political and social movements in the US and Europe, especially for anarchism, feminism, atheism, anti-imperialism, anti-militarism, and anti-capitalism.

Feb 22 2019

15mins

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Rank #13: Ur Fascism by Umberto Eco

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Full Essay https://www.pegc.us/archive/Articles/eco_ur-fascism.pdf

While Eco is firm in claiming “There was only one Nazism," he says, “the fascist game can be played in many forms, and the name of the game does not change.” Eco reduces the qualities of what he calls “Ur-Fascism, or Eternal Fascism” down to 14 “typical” features.

Jan 15 2019

32mins

Play

Rank #14: The Bully's Pulpit by David Graeber

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The Bully's Pulpit: On the Elementary Structure of Domination

Full text here https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/david-graeber-the-bully-s-pulpit

David Graeber (1961- ) is an anarchist, anthropologist, and activist who currently holds a professorship in anthropology at the London School of Economics. Graeber has written extensively on theories of value, social theory, direct action, and ethnographic theory. He participated in the Occupy movement and is a member of the Industrial Workers of the World.

In this essay, Graeber links the psychological impulses of bullying--both of bullies and of passive observers of bullying--to structures of power inherent within hierarchical authority. He contends that from a young age, we are socialized to side with bullies and against victims, and we are socialized to see victims as either deserving their punishment or of having the same moral worth as the bullies themselves.

Apr 20 2019

25mins

Play

Rank #15: Desert by Anonymous, Chapter 2: It’s Later Than We Thought

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Full text here: https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/anonymous-desert

Author’s NoteI have written Desert as a nature loving anarchist primarily addressing others with similar feelings. As a result I have not always explained ideas to which I hold when they are, to some extent, givens within many anarchist and radical environmental circles. Hopefully I have written in an accessible enough manner, so even if you don’t come from this background you will still find Desert readable. While the best introductions to ecology and anarchy are moments spent within undomesticated ecosystems and anarchist communities, some may also find the following books helpful — I did.

Peter Marshall, Demanding the Impossible: A History of Anarchism (London: HarperCollins, 2008).

Fredy Perlman, Against His-story, Against Leviathan (Detroit: Black & Red, 1983).

Christopher Manes, Green Rage: Radical Environmentalism and the Unmaking of Civilization (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1990).

Clive Ponting, A Green History of the World (London: Penguin Books, 1991).

Forward!Something haunts many activists, anarchists, environmentalists, many of my friends. It haunted me. Much of our subcultures tell us it’s not there, that we can’t see it, hear it. Our best wishes for the world tell us not to see it. But for many, despite their best efforts — carrying on with the normal activism, the movement building, living both according to and as an expression of their ethics — despite all this, the spectre gains form. The faint image grows more solid, more unavoidable, until the ghost is staring one in the face. And like many monsters of past tales, when its gaze is met — people freeze. Become unable to move. Give up hope; become disillusioned and inactive. This malaise, freezing, not only slows ‘activist workload’, but I have seen it affect every facet of many of my friends’ lives.

The spectre that many try not to see is a simple realisation — the world will not be ‘saved’. Global anarchist revolution is not going to happen. Global climate change is now unstoppable. We are not going to see the worldwide end to civilisation/capitalism/patriarchy/authority. It’s not going to happen any time soon. It’s unlikely to happen ever. The world will not be ‘saved’. Not by activists, not by mass movements, not by charities and not by an insurgent global proletariat. The world will not be ‘saved’. This realisation hurts people. They don’t want it to be true! But it probably is.

These realisations, this abandonment of illusions should not become disabling. Yet if one believes that it’s all or nothing, then there is a problem. Many friends have ‘dropped out’ of the ‘movement’ whilst others have remained in old patterns but with a sadness and cynicism which signals a feeling of futility. Some hover around scenes critiquing all, but living and fighting little.

“It’s not the despair — I can handle the despair. It’s the hope I can’t handle.” [1]

The hope of a Big Happy Ending, hurts people; sets the stage for the pain felt when they become disillusioned. Because, truly, who amongst us now really believes? How many have been burnt up by the effort needed to reconcile a fundamentally religious faith in the positive transformation of the world with the reality of life all around us? Yet to be disillusioned — with global revolution/with our capacity to stop climate change — should not alter our anarchist nature, or the love of nature we feel as anarchists. There are many possibilities for liberty and wildness still.

What are some of these possibilities and how can we live them? What could it mean to be an anarchist, an environmentalist, when global revolution and world-wide social/eco sustainability are not the aim? What objectives, what plans, what lives, what adventures are there when the illusions are set aside and we walk into the world not disabled by disillusionment but unburdened by it?

Oct 12 2019

18mins

Play

Rank #16: Taoism and Anarchism

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Full Text http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/josh-anarchism-and-taoism

Anarchism is usually considered a recent, Western phenomenon, but its roots reach deep in the ancient civilizations of the East. The first clear expression of an anarchist sensibility may be traced back to the Taoists in ancient China from about the sixth century BC. Indeed, the principal Taoist work, the Tao te Ching, may be considered one of the greatest anarchist classics.

Jul 06 2019

22mins

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Rank #17: Socialism Reaffirmed by Maurice Brinton

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Full text here: https://libcom.org/library/socialism-reaffirmed-maurice-brinton

Some basic principles put together by Maurice Brinton in 1960 aimed at being ones around which revolutionary socialists - as distinct from bureaucratic state socialists - could regroup.

Sep 28 2019

12mins

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Rank #18: Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek, act 3

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Recorded by Librivox.org

Helena Glory, as the daughter of a major industrial power's president, is a woman on a mission. She faces the island factory of Rossum's Universal Robots, the world's leading company in robotic engineering. She is convinced that these new creations called robots they make are deserving of rights like humans do. Everyone else is convinced robots are nothing more than tools for human use. Is it so, or is a robot rebellion becoming a more likely prospect as the robots start to seem more intelligent than first thought?First performed in English in 1922, R.U.R. is most notable for being the play that introduced the word "robot" into the English language and one of the popular early examples of the science fiction genre onstage. (Mary Kay)

Sep 14 2019

22mins

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Rank #19: Murray Bookchin "Ecology and Revolutionary Thought" - Part 2: The Reconstructive Nature of Ecology

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Read the Full text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/lewis-herber-murray-bookchin-ecology-and-revolutionary-thought

Murray Bookchin (1921-2006) was an anarchist and libertarian socialist political theorist, historian, and author. He is perhaps best remembered as a thinker who fused critical ecology with anarchist thought, but his conceptions of democratic confederalism have influenced numerous social and political movements, including the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (also know as Rojava).

In part 2, Bookchin discusses how the increased centralization of society has led to increased environmental damage through energy usage and pollution. The solution, he contends, is to decentralize society through anarchist revolution in order to create a society that is in harmony with nature. For humanity to reach any ecological goal, it must become decentralized and anarchistic, thereby allowing individuals to create diverse social and ecological relationships.

May 26 2019

26mins

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Rank #20: Revolutionary Unity by Nestor Makhno

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Read the full essays here:

http://nestormakhno.info/english/revdisc.htm

http://nestormakhno.info/english/struggle.htm

http://nestormakhno.info/english/newplatform/introduction.htm

Nestor Makhno (1888-1934) was a Ukrainian revolutionary anarchist, military leader, and writer. He led the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine during the Russian Revolution, which helped defeat the tsarist forces and establish the Ukrainian Free Territory (1917-1921). Because the anarchist project in Ukraine threatened the Bolsheviks' monopoly on power following the Russian Revolution, Lenin and Trotsky instructed the Red Army to destroy the Free Territory and murder or imprison anarchists. Makhno went into exile, eventually settling in Paris, France. He joined the Group of Russian Anarchists Abroad and published writings about anarchism and the Russian Revolution.

These three essays are glimpses of Makhno's theories on revolutionary praxis. Along with other members of the Group of Russian Anarchists Abroad, he developed platformism, the anarchist philosophy that says that revolutionaries should adopt unified ideologies, strategies, and tactics to ensure the success of anarchist revolutions. Makhno believed that the splintered anarchist movement ensured that anarchism of any stripe would never succeed. Instead, he proposed the Organizational Platform of the General Union of Anarchists to address the lack of unity between individual anarchists, national anarchist movements, and the international struggle against the state and capitalism. The platform suggests that anarchists must try to agree upon a united set of goals and principles to destroy the state, tactics to achieve those goals, and strategies to organize society after the state is abolished.

Aug 24 2019

18mins

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