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Women in Wyoming Podcast

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Women in Wyoming features inspiring and influential women across the state of Wyoming who are breaking boundaries and shaping the west today. Told through podcast and portrait photography by Lindsay Linton Buk of Linton Productions, Women in Wyoming features modern pioneers, rule breakers and innovative thinkers who show how it's possible to be limitless, find one's full capacity and voice, and think big presently in the state of Wyoming. Visit http://www.womeninwyoming.com to see the full project featuring each subject's portrait and interview.

Read more

Women in Wyoming features inspiring and influential women across the state of Wyoming who are breaking boundaries and shaping the west today. Told through podcast and portrait photography by Lindsay Linton Buk of Linton Productions, Women in Wyoming features modern pioneers, rule breakers and innovative thinkers who show how it's possible to be limitless, find one's full capacity and voice, and think big presently in the state of Wyoming. Visit http://www.womeninwyoming.com to see the full project featuring each subject's portrait and interview.

iTunes Ratings

14 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Great podcast about the Equality State

By Pharrin2 - Oct 18 2017
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MUST LISTEN! This a wonderful and entertaining podcast about the women who make Wyoming, Wyoming. Look no farther than this for interesting perspectives on the coolest square state.

iTunes Ratings

14 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
0
0
0
0

Great podcast about the Equality State

By Pharrin2 - Oct 18 2017
Read more
MUST LISTEN! This a wonderful and entertaining podcast about the women who make Wyoming, Wyoming. Look no farther than this for interesting perspectives on the coolest square state.

Listen to:

Cover image of Women in Wyoming Podcast

Women in Wyoming Podcast

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Women in Wyoming features inspiring and influential women across the state of Wyoming who are breaking boundaries and shaping the west today. Told through podcast and portrait photography by Lindsay Linton Buk of Linton Productions, Women in Wyoming features modern pioneers, rule breakers and innovative thinkers who show how it's possible to be limitless, find one's full capacity and voice, and think big presently in the state of Wyoming. Visit http://www.womeninwyoming.com to see the full project featuring each subject's portrait and interview.

Rank #1: Lori Olson | Backcountry pilot and rural airstrip advocate

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Backcountry pilot and rural airstrip advocate Lori Olson came from a flying family in Upton, Wyoming. Her father was a navigator in WWII and later, used his plane as a means to transport Lori and her siblings across the state. Growing up, Lori was afraid to fly, but after moving back to Upton with her husband and twin daughters, the urge to fly became so strong she couldn't ignore it. She took a discovery course flight and was hooked. In the five short years that Lori has pursued her dream to fly, she's become the director of the Upton Municipal airport, and leads a statewide task force to save rural airstrips around the state. A commercial pilot, Lori prefers to land in the backcountry versus on pavement. 

During our interview, Lori and I talk about her dream to fly and how her world has changed from following her heart and pursuing her dream.

Jul 08 2018

20mins

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Rank #2: Marilyn Kite | Wyoming's first female Supreme Court Justice

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Episode 02 features Wyoming's first female Supreme Court and first female Chief Justice, Marilyn Kite. Marilyn is thoroughly a Wyoming woman - she was born in Laramie, attended the University of Wyoming, and stayed in Wyoming after graduation where she’d be an influential force in developing the Wyoming branch of Holland & Hart (now a nationwide law firm). During our interview, I talk with Marilyn about how she came to serve in Wyoming’s Supreme court, why she felt a woman should have occupied that position years earlier, and how more women can follow in her footsteps.

Podcast produced by Linton Productions.

Oct 02 2017

24mins

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Rank #3: Clarene Law | Self-made business mogul & community steward

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Clarene grew up in a blue-collar family and became a self-made millionaire through her hotel and business endeavors. Clarene doesn’t think of herself that way, though. In her mind, her greatest success is her network of relationships with others, because it’s their support that got her to where she is today. Clarene is well-known in her community and around the state for her kindness and commitment to helping people, as well as for her roles in public service. She served 14 years in state legislature, as well as on numerous boards and commissions. Clarene can still can be found most days working at the Antler - her flagship motel, which she purchased 55 years ago. At 84 years old, why does she go to work everyday? “Because it needs done.”

Podcast by Linton Productions.

Oct 03 2017

28mins

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Rank #4: Nina McConigley | Award-winning author & professor

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Nina McConigley is an accomplished author whose work tells a less common story of Wyoming- one of identity, race and the immigrant experience in the rural West. Nina's first book, Cowboys and East Indians, won the prestigious Pen Open Book Award in 2014, as well as the High Plains Book award and made Oprah’s List. Nina tells me what it was like growing up in Wyoming as a woman of color, her creative process and her upcoming novel.

Podcast by Linton Productions.

Oct 03 2017

29mins

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Rank #5: Nimi McConigley | Groundbreaking journalist & politician

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Nimi McConigley’s storied life began in Madras, India where she became an established journalist- working for India’s first and to-date, only female Prime Minister, Indira Ghandi. Later, Nimi became the first woman of color to run a television news station in Casper, Wyoming, and later, ran for office and became the first Indian-born person in the entire US to serve in state government. Nimi's story is a true tale of courage, being yourself and embracing difference as a strength.

Podcast by Linton Productions.

Oct 03 2017

33mins

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Rank #6: Megan Grassell | Founder & CEO of Yellowberry

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Megan Grassell is a teen founder and the CEO of Yellowberry- a bra, underwear, activewear and loungewear company for girls ages 8-14. Megan grew up in Pinedale, Wyoming and later in Jackson as a competitive ski racer. She founded Yellowberry when she was 17 years old after discovering the only option for her younger sister's first bra was a leopard print push-up or a sports bra. Determined to create a non-sexualized, stylish first bra option for young girls, Megan launched Yellowberry to national acclaim. At 22, Megan's partnered with American Eagle, has been featured on Good Morning America and the Today Show, and been named to Time's 25 Most Influential Teens, Yahoo's 24 Millennials to Watch and Forbes 30 Under 30 lists.

During our interview, Megan and I talk about how growing up in Wyoming influenced her entrepreneurial journey, her mission to become the brand that girls grow up with, and her passion to help other girls realize their ambition and own their unique strengths and talents.

Jul 03 2018

20mins

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Rank #7: Aura Newlin | Wyoming anthropologist and educator on the Japanese American incarceration of WWII

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Aura Newlin is an anthropologist, educator, advocate and public speaker whose Wyoming roots run deep. A 4th-generation, Japanese American Wyomingite, Aura grew up in Riverton, Wyoming. Her parents, former peace-corps volunteers, exposed Aura and her siblings to a broader world through international volunteer work. This global imprint influenced Aura’s interest in learning about other cultures and led her to become an anthropologist. “Anthropology turns everything on its head. As anthropologists, we try to understand what it might be like to live in someone else’s shoes, to understand what their experiences are like through their eyes.” Aura loves sharing the world with her students by introducing them to anthropology and the practice of “questioning whether something is normal and natural or if that’s just seemingly normal and natural because that’s the way you were raised.”

Aura landed her dream job teaching anthropology and sociology at Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming, a mere 15 miles from the Heart Mountain confinement site. After Pearl Harbor, up to 14,000 Japanese American immigrants and their children were incarcerated at Heart Mountain, one of ten confinement sites established by the War Relocation Authority during WWII. Her great-grandfather made his career as a railroader in southern Wyoming, but by WWII had moved to Hollywood, California for health reasons. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, effectively placing approximately 120,000 Japanese immigrants and their American-born children in war-time camps, Aura’s great-grandfather was sent back to Wyoming, this time to Heart Mountain. Aura’s grandfather, living and working for the Union Pacific railroad in Green River, Wyoming at this same time, was fired along with all the other employees of Japanese ancestry. Later, her grandfather was offered his job back, but he declined.

For Aura, working as an educator in such close proximity to her relatives’ experience at Heart Mountain “feels like destiny.” In addition to teaching her students, she speaks around the state and to legal audiences around the country about what happened at Heart Mountain and the Japanese American incarceration.

Reflecting on why she continues to educate her students and speak to various audiences, she says, “We need to embrace the bad along with the good, because it’s part of what makes us who we are. I don’t see Heart Mountain as something that belongs to Japanese American history. It is American history, and it is Wyoming history. As I go around the state talking with different communities about this, I hope to instill some of that passion and hope that I feel about this history. I would like to continue to have a voice at the national level and to be heard because we have an important story that needs to be told, and I like telling it.”

Mar 08 2019

25mins

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Rank #8: Lynette St. Clair | Shoshone linguist & cultural preservationist

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Lynette St. Clair grew up in Ft. Washakie, Wyoming on the Wind River Reservation. A linguist, cultural preservationist, former educator and education consultant, Lynette is passionate about preserving and sharing the Shoshone language with the next generation and with the world. Lynette was awarded the National Johnson O'Malley Teacher of the Year distinction in 2015 for her implementation of technology to enhance language instruction to the children of the Wind River Reservation. She's been involved with statewide standards initiatives to address how the contributions of American Indians are taught in Wyoming classrooms, representing an authentic voice for indigenous people in the re-writing of history. Lynette's cultural projects include Shoshone Bingo, Art for the Sky, HOPA Mountain Cultural Exchange and Five Buffalo Days.

During our interview, Lynette and I talk about her journey to becoming an educator and program consultant, as well as her mission to preserve and implement Shoshone language and culture as a means to instill pride and sense of self within the next generation on the Wind River Reservation.

Jun 04 2018

26mins

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Rank #9: Rev. Bernadine Craft | Episcopal priest, former state senator & community steward

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Rev. Bernadine Craft is an Episcopal priest, former state representative, psychotherapist, and the Executive Director of Sweetwater BOCES in her hometown of Rock Springs, Wyoming. In her multiple community service roles, Bernadine's primary concern is being a voice for the voiceless. As a state senator and representative, having served in both Wyoming's House and Senate, Bernadine pushed forward legislation concerned with human services issues, including domestic violence, animal abuse, and advocating for the rights of children, the elderly and disabled. As a priest, Bernadine's faith belief is open, inclusive and pledges to respect the dignity and worth of every human being.

During our interview, Bernadine and I talk about her journey home to Rock Springs, the importance of being open to change and life's possibilities, and her passion for representing underserved voices in her community and across the state.

Jun 04 2018

22mins

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Rank #10: Climb Wyoming | A statewide nonprofit helping low income single moms discover self-sufficiency

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Single mothers and their children experience the highest rates of poverty among families in Wyoming. Climb Wyoming is a statewide non-profit helping to alleviate poverty by providing free job training, life skill development, mental health counseling and guaranteed job placement to low-income, single mothers living in six communities around the state of Wyoming.

In 1986, Climb’s founder and Executive Director, Dr. Ray Fleming Dinneen, and her mother, a widely sought-after psychologist and consulting forensic expert, were approached by the federal government to develop job training programs for populations most at risk for living in poverty. Speaking about her mother, Dr. Ray recalls, “So much of my mom was working with those who didn’t have a sense of themselves. She had so much hope for everyone and could see the potential in everyone.” Together, they began building Climb’s transformative model to recognize and unlock the potential of Wyoming single mothers.

Climb’s model is immersive, intense and demands the full attention of participants and staff. Programming takes place over a three-month period with groups of ten moms at a time. The basis of Climb’s programming is career training and placement, but there’s more to permanent life change than getting a job. Climb accomplishes long-term self-sufficiency through life skill training and mental health counseling through group and 1:1 sessions.

Poverty is cyclical and passed down from one generation to the next. Over the 30+ years of Climb’s evolution, they’ve developed one of the nation’s most successful models for moving families out of poverty and have supported more than 2,000 women and their families. The result is a collective force of empowered, self-sufficient women who are confident, upwardly mobile and have created a better life for themselves and their children.

In this multi-subject profile, I talk with Climb’s founder, Dr. Ray Fleming Dinneen, Climb’s leadership staff and the incredible moms who share their journeys of self-sufficiency and vulnerability as a pathway to living more courageously.

Mar 05 2019

20mins

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