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CLAREMONT: The Trial

Ever since the shocking deaths of three young women in 1996 and 1997, the unanswered questions surrounding the Claremont serial killings have remained one of the biggest mysteries in WA history. Any hope of justice in the tragic deaths of Ciara Glennon, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer seemed bleak for more than 20 years, with police coming unstuck and no sign of a breakthrough. That was until the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards in 2016, who was subsequently charged with the trio's murders. For the past three years details about the allegations facing Mr Edwards have been in short supply as his case headed toward what has been dubbed the trial of the century. Now, we bring you in to the courtroom and walk you through all the revelations, allegations and talking points as the historic court case unfolds. Join our team of journalists and legal experts as we break down all the key information from the proceedings in Claremont: The Trial.

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S2JUMP IN NOW: Claremont the Trial Catch Up Part 1

Welcome to this special catch up episode of Claremont in Conversation. We’re at the half-way mark in WA’s trial of the century. If you’ve never listened before, this is your perfect chance to get up to speed on everything that’s happened in WA’s trial of the century, without having to listen to 57 episodes. If you’ve been following the trial since day one, this is your perfect chance to recap the last three months before the trial moves into fibre evidence. It’s been the trial WA has waited more than two decades for. Between 1996 and 1997 in the affluent, beautiful and safe suburb of Claremont, the disappearance of three women struck fear into the lives of the people of Perth, Western Australia. Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon are names most people in WA know. They’re known because they’re the three victims of the Claremont Serial Killer. Sarah was the first to go missing, in the early hours of January 27, 1996. She called a taxi from a Telstra phone box in Claremont just after 2am. Three minutes later the taxi arrived but she wasn’t there. She’s never been seen since. Five months later, Jane went missing in almost identical circumstances to Sarah. She had been out in Claremont with friends, except when they decided to go home, she stayed. The last time she was seen was on CCTV vision. It took 32 seconds for Jane to never be seen alive again. Then in March 1997, Ciara, who had been travelling around the world, had just returned home. Friends convinced her to go out, she reluctantly agreed. The 27-year-old spent just 15 minutes in the Continental Hotel in Claremont and decided to walk home. The last time she was ever seen alive, she was leaning into a white Commodore Station Wagon. These killings went unsolved for 23 years. Now, the man police and the state say is the man who murdered Sarah, Jane and Ciara is on trial. His name is Bradley Robert Edwards. Join the Claremont in Conversation team, Natalie Bonjolo and The West Australian Newspaper’s legal affairs editor Tim Clarke as they take you through the first part of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, known as the “civilian witnesses”. Hear from the people who knew the victims, some of the last people to see them alive and hear from the people involved in the accused man’s life - his wives, friends and colleagues as the prosecution try to paint a picture of what would drive a man to kill three lone, vulnerable women. If you’ve enjoyed this episode and want to know more, start from season 2. Part 2 - The Forensics can be found on your favourite podcast app on Saturday.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1hr 1min

6 Mar 2020

Rank #1

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S2Bonus Episode: Your DNA Questions Answered

Now the DNA portion of the trial is over, and before we delve into the world of fibre evidence, the Claremont in Conversation team have consolidated all of the DNA evidence which is crucial to the case. Ciara Glennon’s fingernails, the Karrakatta rape victim’s swabs and a kimono - the three pieces of evidence which the prosecution say led them to Bradley Edwards. Joined by forensic expert Brendan Chapman, Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke answer the questions you’ve asked about all things DNA in relation to the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you’re just jumping in, hear about the advanced DNA technique at the time which found microscopic fragments of DNA from a broken fingernail, the international agencies involved in the testing, and the fluke cold case reinvestigation which blew the Claremont case wide open. And if you’ve been following the case from the beginning, recap the last six weeks of DNA evidence before the trial of the century resumes on March 23. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation team or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

46mins

19 Mar 2020

Rank #2

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S2E19: The Crime Scenes

Senior police officers who attended the burial sites of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon's bodies have described the 'mayhem' and 'organised chaos' which became the crime scenes when the women's bodies were found. In particular, when the body of the third woman to go missing, Ciara Glennon's body was found in shrub land in Eglinton, both police and the media started using the term 'serial killer'. This intense interest by the media was brought up in court on day 19 of WA's trial of the century. As detectives tried to preserve the scene, camera screws also tried to capture every moment. One senior officer even mentioned one reporter by name, that was 7News journalist Adrian Barich, who he said was arrested on the scene of Ciara Glennon's burial site, but as Adrian explains, as a rookie sports journalist, it was something he'd never expected to witness, and gives us his account of what happened. The case also focussed around contamination. It was revealed a key piece of evidence which the prosecution says links the Karrakatta rape the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon had been unaccounted for in the WA Police database for almost a year. Join Natalie Bonjolo, special guest Adrian Barich along with Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they discuss day 19 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you have a question for the team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au, and to see all of the evidence released by Justice Hall so far, visit https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-all-the-exhibits-released-to-the-media-in-bradley-edwards-supreme-court-trial-ng-b881415460z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

35mins

7 Jan 2020

Rank #3

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S2E1: Claremont: the trial begins

A never-before heard phone call Sarah Spiers made in the hours before she disappeared. Descriptions of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s final movements, and gruesome evidence shown to a packed-out court on the first day of the accused Claremont Serial Killer, Bradley Robert Edwards’ trial. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and legal experts, criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps and Barrister Nicholas van Hattem as they discuss Day 1 of the trial WA has waited 23 years for.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

23mins

25 Nov 2019

Rank #4

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S1E4: The case against Bradley Robert Edwards

Years pass and with the public losing hope that the horrific mystery will ever be solved, a new suspect emerges. Telecommunications technician Bradley Robert Edwards is arrested in a dawn raid. The 50-year-old pleads not guilty and will stand trial for three murders, rape and abduction. So what is the police case against him? And is it possible that police missed a link that could have led them to the accused man than a decade ago?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

47mins

25 Mar 2019

Rank #5

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S1E3: The Wrong Man

As the hunt for a serial killer who has struck three times in Claremont continues, police train a laser focus on one very peculiar man who admits to driving the streets and picking up at least one woman. But the man’s mother says enough is enough. A TV reporter spends an hour with the suspect in his beachside apartment, quizzing him over the case. She concludes that detectives are pursuing the wrong man and contacts the father of one victim to share her view. Now, more than 20 years later, a former police commissioner says that suspect and his family are owed an apology.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

32mins

15 Mar 2019

Rank #6

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S2E32: Cause of Death

It has been revealed for the first time that Ciara Glennon may have been struck on the back of her head in the moments before her death. The blow may have stunned, or rendered her semi-conscious. This information we can bring to you now, because late on day 32 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Justice Stephen Hall lifted the suppression order put in place the day before, which had banned all details about Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s autopsies being broadcast to the public. After an application by Seven West Media, and negotiations with the prosecution, an order was made to be able to publish limited details from the two murdered womens’ post-mortems. In this information, was the revelation that Ciara had a small fracture to her skull, which pathologist Dr Karin Margolius said was likely to have been inflicted by a sharp object shortly before her death. As Tim Clarke and Alison Fan explain, the injuries suffered to both Jane and Ciara extend further than the ‘neck defects’. They had injuries consistent with ‘a boxer’s stance’, which pathologist Clive Cooke called ‘classic self-defence wounds.’ As for their cause of death, It’s likely Ciara Glennon died from the large neck injuries she suffered. These were at the back and sides of her neck. In this podcast, Tim Clarke explains why Jane Rimmer’s was inconclusive. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they wrap up week seven of WA’s trial of the century, discussing the information that’s been allowed to be broadcast, as well as explaining why we can hear it now. For more on the Claremont Serial Killings trial, head to https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killingsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

23mins

24 Jan 2020

Rank #7

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S2E22: The Contamination Case

When police arrived at the scenes where Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies had been dumped, They didn’t have to wear gloves to prevent cross contamination. On day 22 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, former forensic police officer Robert Hemelaar took the stand for a third day where it was revealed there wasn’t a big focus on preserving a crime scene in the mid 1990s. He said there was no protocol for wearing gloves and covers for their boots, only that gloves should be worn while handling ‘deceased matter’, for their own safety. During his cross examination by defence lawyer Paul Yovich, Mr Hemelaar admitted he had handled some evidence - a tree branch - with his bare hands. The court had been told tree branches had been pulled off nearby trees and placed over both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies to partially conceal them. He also said a key piece of evidence, a hair sample from Ciara Glennon which the prosecution says contained fibres matching unique Telstra shorts, the kind issued to Bradley Edwards while he was working at Telstra, had not been videoed while being collected from Ciara’s body. It was revealed that the sample had also not had tamper-proof tape stuck on the container until years after it was collected. Cross-contamination is the main case the defence has said will provide reasonable doubt about whether Bradley Edwards is the Claremont Serial Killer. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they take you through Day 22’s evidence, and answer some of your questions. If you have a question for the podcast team, send it in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au You can also find all of the exhibits released by Justice Hall at https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-all-the-exhibits-released-to-the-media-in-bradley-edwards-supreme-court-trial-ng-b881415460zSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

31mins

10 Jan 2020

Rank #8

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S2E75: The First Physical Evidence Linking Jane and Ciara

One slide of two microscopic fibres compared to each other shown to the court on day 75. That’s the first piece of physical evidence in the trial - 5 months in - that forensically links Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. The blue polyester fibres, found on Ciara’s shirt and in Jane Rimmer’s hair were compared on a slide and shown to the court. This is one of just a handful of evidence that the prosecution can present that shows Jane and Ciara are linked to the crime, outside of circumstantial evidence. You can see that fibre at thewest.com.au We got through 25 fibres today, and as Tim Clarke explains in this episode, while it feels like Groundhog Day, the evidence is important, because it's what the prosecution say links two of the murder victims, along with the rape Bradley Edwards has admitted to, to him, his car and his workwear. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

30mins

20 Apr 2020

Rank #9

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S2E66: The Last Thing Jane and Ciara Could Have Ever Seen

Could the inside of the Holden Commodore VS series be the last thing Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon ever saw before they were killed? It was revealed CSI took three days to dismantle and examine the Holden Commodore that Bradley Edwards drove in 1996 and 1997. Hundreds of exhibits were taken from the car - ChemCentre looking for fibres, PathWest looking for biological material, police looking for investigative clues, polilight exams, swabs, mats, seat covers and door panels taken away. Anything that could be examined, was. Even though the car was assigned to Bradley Edwards in April 1996, the witness today - CSI officer Acting Senior Sergeant Steven Mark told the court they still looked for any signs of Sarah Spiers, who disappeared on January 26, 1996. Nothing from Sarah Spiers or DNA was found, but fibres were - and that’s what this car brings to the case. The prosecution say the seat fibres were found on Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. So, what is the importance of this car and fibres to this case? Criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps says in other criminal trials, fibres are used in evidence to make sure every stone is turned in the investigation. Fibres may not be the most important exhibits in the trial, but they are physical links between Bradley Edwards and the two women. More than 90 photos of the car were shown to the court, and have been released to the public. As Tim Clarke explains in this episode, the last photo is probably the most interesting because it shows a piece of the puzzle that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Those photos can be seen on thewest.com.au. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps as they discuss day 66 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

30mins

1 Apr 2020

Rank #10

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S2E62: Prime Suspect’s Knife Sent to the FBI

Just as day 62 of the Claremont serial killings trial was ending, drama erupted in the courtroom. Coronavirus-related drama. Justice Hall hauled a security staff member into the courtroom after it emerged some pensioners and students were banned from entering the court. He told the security their actions, which were approved by the court’s general manager could amount to contempt of court, saying, “I take this extremely seriously. The public has been discouraged from attending but not excluded." And "No one is to be excluded from this court other than by my order.” During proceedings, former forensic police officer Victor Webb gave evidence, who told the court knives owned by the prime suspect at the time - Lance Williams’ - was sent to the FBI along with Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s hair and clothes. Despite finding nothing, police still pursued him, overtly and round the clock, for years. It wouldn’t be until 2008 that Lance Williams would be cleared. Along with MACRO exhibits, exhibits from operation Ambrose - the investigation into the murder of Gerard Ross was sent to the FBI too. In 1999 the FBI had technology that WA didn’t - that’s why the samples were sent there. WA police also sought the advice from the best entomologists and profilers in the world. They stayed there until 2001, and what would come out of it would be the critical fibres that the prosecution say link Ciara Glennon, Jane Rimmer and the Karrakatta rape victim to Bradley Robert Edwards. Join Tim Clarke, Natalie Bonjolo and criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they discuss day 62. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

33mins

25 Mar 2020

Rank #11

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S2E44: The Eureka Moment

In the last hour of day 44’s evidence, the prosecution began reading out statements from the former PathWest manager, senior DNA analyst Laurie Webb, who was sacked from his role in 2016 for breaching testing protocols and cutting corners. He’s not giving evidence in court, and as Tim Clarke explained last week as he broke the story, it’s not likely we’ll find out why. But what we did find out was that he was the person who had that ‘eureka moment’ - he was the person who, in 2009 entered the male DNA found from UK testing into WA’s DNA database and found a hit. That DNA hit matched with a then-unsolved rape from 1995 - the Karrakatta rape. As Tim Clarke has explained in the podcast, what it would have felt like to see that, a lead in one of WA’s most notorious unsolved crimes for more than a decade, would have been astounding. We also heard in detail how those DNA samples made their way to the UK in the first place, taken in person by Laurie Webb, the samples never leaving his sight. But the court heard for the first time that there was also DNA samples from another victim unrelated to the Claremont Serial Killings case that was being taken to the UK at the same time. Join Emily Moulton, Tim Clarke and Natalie Bonjolo as they discuss the brief statements from Laurie Webb, as well as the completion of forensic scientist Aleks Bagdonavicius’ evidence-in-chief. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au, and for more coverage of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, head to thewest.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

22mins

13 Feb 2020

Rank #12

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S2Bonus Episode: Getting "That" Shot

Whenever there’s a big event, there’s bound to be news crews. That was no exception when police descended on the accused Claremont Serial Killer’s house on December 22, 2016. But unlike now, those news crews had no idea just how big that raid would be. With special guests, veteran 7NEWS cameramen Ray Raab and The West Australian photographer Justin Benson-Cooper joining Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke, they discuss, even when the opposition got a shot of ‘a man’ being taken away by police from his house, they had no idea what they were looking at. As the day progressed, rumours started to swirl. Rumours turned into questions and then scrambling by news houses across the state. It was the biggest story WA had ever seen. Did police catch the Claremont Serial Killer? We still won’t find out for another few months as the trial continues. Reporters, camera operators and photographers had one chance at getting a shot of the man arrested for one of the most infamous crimes in WA history. As Justin and Ray relive the day they stayed out until 4am to get “that” shot of Bradley Edwards being driven to police lockup after a six-hour interview with police. The preparation, the nerves, the 10 seconds of action. In this bonus episode, the podcast team talk the massive police operation, the confusion which led to shock and captured the attention of the state. Join the team again on Thursday as court resumes.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

29mins

26 Feb 2020

Rank #13

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S2E55: Blood Everywhere…But No DNA

Ciara Glennon’s body was found 19 days after she went missing, in bushland 40 kms north of Perth on April 3, 1997. She was found fully clothed, her shirt covered in blood.  After her post-mortem, her shirt was sent off for DNA testing, but what scientists found was unusual. They found nothing, not even Ciara’s own DNA. This was explained by senior forensic scientist Scott Egan, who told the court it was likely exposure to the elements destroyed all DNA, even Ciara’s. But when asked how DNA was found under her fingernails, that’s because, according to the forensic scientist, they were somewhat protected.  It was the testing of the DNA of Ciara’s fingernails which came under questioning again today, this time by the prosecution, and as Tim Clarke and Alison Fan explain in this episode, they managed to get some ground back after an embarrassing end to the week for PathWest, with seven contamination events found on Claremont exhibits. Mr Egan told the court, however, in total, PathWest counted 28 ‘quality issues’ in their more than 17,000 tests of Claremont exhibits over 25 years, an average error rate of around 0.16%, which he said was lower than the global average. He also defended his lab practices, saying he couldn’t see any opportunities of how Bradley Edwards’ DNA could have come into contact with the Karrakatta rape victim’s samples to contaminate it - as the defence has suggested. The prosecution today even called that theory ‘fanciful’. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they take you through the details of day 55.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

20mins

3 Mar 2020

Rank #14

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S2Bonus Episode: Day in the Life of a Court Reporter

Between them, veteran 7NEWS journalist and The West’s legal affairs editor Tim Clarke have decades of court reporting experience behind them. They’ve covered everything from murder, dodgy politicians, bikies and everything in between. But this case is as big as they come. Tim Clarke has followed the case in the courts since Bradley Edwards was arrested three years ago, and Alison Fan has followed the case since the very beginning, and even helped search for the Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, now she’s seeing it through to the end, whatever that will be. The two experienced court reporters reveal what it’s like doing their job, from the good and bad exciting and dull. In this bonus episode, join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they give you a behind the scenes look into a day in the life of a court reporter.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

23mins

2 Mar 2020

Rank #15

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S2E24: The Lock of Hair

Following Jane Rimmer’s post-mortem, the pathologist who carried it out gave one of the detectives a lock of Jane’s hair. The detective, Vicky Young then washed, brushed and placed an elastic around it and gave it to the Rimmer family. During her evidence today, she said it was an act of compassion. But she also said the hair was covered in fluids and matter when it was given to her. On the podcast for day 24 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Alison Fan, Tim Clarke and Natalie Bonjolo discuss this act of kindness, and whether this could have an impact in the case against Bradley Edwards. In a massive day of WA’s trial of the century, several police officers were questioned, including the first Macro Taskforce detective, who organised a massive search - which included TRG officers - of the Wellard area following the discovery of Jane Rimmer’s body, for Sarah Spiers. But they didn’t find anything. Sarah still has never been found. Also today, for Sergeant Barry Mott revealed he drove to Jane Rimmer’s crime scene in a station wagon, the type of car the prosecution says Bradley Edwards used when the murders happened, and fibres from it which were found in both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies. Join the Claremont in Conversation podcast team as they discuss why this new information may be an obstacle for the prosecution. Send in your questions for the team at claremonrpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

33mins

14 Jan 2020

Rank #16

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S2E23: A Doctor’s Memory

****WARNING: Some viewers may find the content discussed in this episode distressing**** The doctor who examined the 17-year-old who was brutally raped by Bradley Edwards in 1995 has recalled the horrific injuries the teenager suffered that night. In Day 23 of the Claremont serial killings trial Dr Amanda Barnard gave evidence saying while she had examined thousands of women during her career as a doctor for the sexual assault resource centre, the injuries inflicted on the 17-year-old by Bradley Robert Edwards almost 25 years ago had stayed with her. Bradley Edwards pleaded guilty to the rape, in which he abducted the teenager while she was walking to a friends’ house in Claremont on February 11, 1995.  He grabbed the 17-year-old from behind, bound her hands, put a hood over her head and carried her to his van, where he tied her legs, drove her to Karrakatta Cemetery where he then brutally raped the teenager twice. Dr Barnard, who was working at the sexual assault resource centre at the time told the court how the teenager’s examination was ‘painful and difficult’, saying, “I think the things that made this particular case stick in my mind were the violent nature of assault by a stranger, the fact that she had been hooded and restrained, the extent and painfulness of her injuries and given the fact of her youth and that she was a virgin,”  But while on the stand, the doctor was quizzed about how she collected samples from the teenager, how they were stored and who she sent them to. The defence say these samples – which were found to have Bradley Edwards’ DNA on them were cross-contaminated with the fingernail clippings from Ciara Glennon. But the prosecution say they were never even stored on the same shelf, let alone could be contaminated, and previously called the suggestion of cross contamination an “Exercise in errant fantasy”. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they take you through day 23 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you, or anyone you know has been affected by the content in this podcast, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 Or the sexual assault resource centre on 1800 199 888 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

33mins

13 Jan 2020

Rank #17

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S2E63: The Trial Must Go On

Despite the coronavirus outbreak, the judge presiding over the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Justice Hall effectively told the court on day 63 that the trial must go on. At the end of the shortened day for the cross examination of former forensic police officer Victor Webb, Justice Hall told the court he is prepared to make changes to the process to allow witnesses to give evidence from home. But for day 63, former forensic police officer Victor Webb was grilled by the defence about storage and transfer of critical exhibits, as well as the car he drove in the 90s. As Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton explain, the defence will try to argue that instead of the critical fibres linking Bradley Edwards to Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon through his Telstra car and shorts, instead, they were found on the victims through contamination and fibre transfer. It’s previously been revealed several police officers drove police cars, some of of which were commodore station wagons to the crime scenes of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, as well as to the morgue during their post-mortems, where the bodies were placed on a sheet on the floor. But the prosecution say the fibres got there from the women being in the car driven by Bradley Edwards. The prosecution also argue he didn’t necessarily have to be wearing his Telstra uniform at the time of the murders, instead, some fibres from his Telstra shorts stayed in the car, and transferred onto the women while they were in his car. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton as they take you through day 63. Send in any questions you have for the podcast team to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

25mins

26 Mar 2020

Rank #18

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S2E67: The Trial Travels to China

With a video link to China, technical difficulties plagued the morning’s proceedings. When the technical issues were sorted, day 67 took a deep dive into fibres, VIN numbers and cars. Tim Clarke says in this episode, you would have had to be a car buff for the day’s evidence to keep you interested and focussed the whole day. Luckily, Tim Clarke was in court all day and takes us through the most important aspects of the day. A former Holden manufacturer, who told the court the particular colours of the fibres of the car - found in Jane and Ciara’s hair - were only found in that make and model of car. It was a narrowing down exercise today, narrowing down the chances that the car police found could be the car which Jane and Ciara were in, and possible take to where they were killed. Join Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke as they discuss the day’s evidence, and make it easy to understand. Send any questions you have for the podcast team to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

27mins

2 Apr 2020

Rank #19

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S2E53: The Random Test that Changed the Investigation

It was the random testing of a silk kimono in 2016, which led police to their breakthrough in Australia’s most expensive and longest running investigation, and the dramatic arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards. Today, on day 53, the scientist who tested that kimono took the stand. Scott Egan, who was a scientist at Pathwest in 2016, told the court the kimono, which was taken out of storage by a cold case police officer, was tested by him on November 23, 2016. The silk kimono was left behind during a break-in, and attack on a teenager while she slept in her Huntingdale home in 1988. Earlier in the trial, the court heard Edwards snuck into the woman’s bedroom on Valentine’s day, crept onto her bed and pinned her down while placing something in her mouth. Bradley Edwards has pleaded guilty to the attack. Scott Egan not only gave evidence today, he was also the subject of another witness’s cross examination. His colleague Andrew McDonald was forced to name him, along with three other scientists who contaminated samples from Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. During that cross examination, an unusual case of contamination was brought up by the defence, except it had nothing to do with MACRO exhibits, and happened in the UK. In this episode, Tim Clarke questions why the prosecution didn’t jump up to object, and what this evidence could mean to the trial. Join Tim, along with Natalie Bonjolo and Alison Fan as they discuss day 53. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au and for more on the Claremont Serial Killings trial, head to thewest.com.auSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

27mins

27 Feb 2020

Rank #20