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Science

Base Pairs

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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Base Pairs podcast ​tells​ stories that ​convey​ the power of genetic information – past and present.Named among the 2018 Webby Awards’ “five best podcasts in the world” for the subjects of science and education.Presented the Platinum Award for podcasting by PR News.

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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Base Pairs podcast ​tells​ stories that ​convey​ the power of genetic information – past and present.Named among the 2018 Webby Awards’ “five best podcasts in the world” for the subjects of science and education.Presented the Platinum Award for podcasting by PR News.

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
3
1
3

Beautiful science

By stuman914 - Feb 06 2019
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Listening for 2nd time. Wonderful data well done!!!

Good but too infrequent

By drjonRohde - Jan 06 2019
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I have followed base pairs since first episode . More serious but posted irregularly. The initial series was logical and progressive but recently sporadic and not linked to a logical sequence . A better planned series is needed to reach 5 stars.

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
3
1
3

Beautiful science

By stuman914 - Feb 06 2019
Read more
Listening for 2nd time. Wonderful data well done!!!

Good but too infrequent

By drjonRohde - Jan 06 2019
Read more
I have followed base pairs since first episode . More serious but posted irregularly. The initial series was logical and progressive but recently sporadic and not linked to a logical sequence . A better planned series is needed to reach 5 stars.
Cover image of Base Pairs

Base Pairs

Latest release on Dec 27, 2018

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 1 day ago

Rank #1: 12 - Good Genes, Bad Science

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In the early 1900s, American science took a wrong turn toward eugenics. In this episode, we talk with experts in both science and history about what we can learn from this dark period in today’s age of unprecedented control over the genome.

Oct 13 2017

27mins

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Rank #2: 3 - Non-modern Family

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From the scale of a single ancient murder victim to interactions between large groups of humans and Neanderthals who lived 100,000 years ago, genetic information holds many secrets about human history.

In this episode, "Ötzi the Iceman" and Dr Adam Siepel help us expose new secrets of the human genome.

Aug 15 2016

17mins

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Rank #3: 4 - The People Problem

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Nearly ten billion people will walk the Earth by 2050, and for some of the poorest and fastest growing countries, that could mean a bleak and hungry future.

Dr Josef Schmidhuber of the FAO and CSHL Professor David Jackson explain what has gone wrong, and how genetics can help.

Sep 15 2016

21mins

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Rank #4: 8 – Dark Matter of the Genome (part 1)

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Could “genome” be a misnomer? The name implies that our genetic information is mainly genes, yet when the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003, it revealed that genes comprise a tiny minority. About 98 percent of the genome is something else — a kind of genomic dark matter.

We chat with an astrophysicist-turned-genome-biologist, Assistant Professor Molly Hammell, about how she ended up studying a type of genomic dark matter called transposons.

Mar 14 2017

23mins

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Rank #5: 15 – The Immune System, Unleashed

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You may have heard of it; "immunotherapy" has started to appear in headlines over the last few years. In this episode, however, we reveal that the practice of cancer immunotherapy is actually far older than even our understanding of the immune system! We also talk to a CSHL researcher who is showing that the immune system doesn’t even need to be engineered to kill cancer. It just needs to be unleashed.

May 15 2018

25mins

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Rank #6: 14.5 – Medicine and Mad Scientists

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It’s important to know that a drug works, but knowing how it works can be just as crucial. CSHL Fellow Jason Sheltzer discovered that the hypothesis explaining the action of a new cancer drug was incorrect, indicating that its beneficial effects had to be due to other factors. Hear more from him following up on his discussion in episode 14, “The cancer answer that wasn’t.” Also, in a new pop culture segment, we talk about movie “mad scientists” and how they contribute to misconceptions about the way real science is done.

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Disclaimer: This product is a not-for-profit learning resource. All film clips included are solely for the purposes of critique and education. They are solely the property of (in order of mention) Universal Pictures (as Universal Pictures Corp.), Universal Pictures, Amblin Entertainment, U-Drive Productions, and Universal Pictures (presents).

Apr 13 2018

15mins

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Rank #7: 12.5 - Big Decisions

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Who will use CRISPR to alter their child's DNA? Who gets to decide which traits are desirable? Following up on our last episode, "Good Genes, Bad Science," we hear from David Micklos, executive director at CSHL’s DNA Learning Center, and Miriam Rich, CSHL Archives Sydney Brenner Research Scholar and doctoral student at Harvard, on these big questions.

Nov 15 2017

13mins

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Rank #8: 5 - Sink or Swim

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Professor Adrian Krainer was offered the opportunity to run his own lab when he was just 27 years old as part of a brand new “Fellows” program—which allowed him, in his words, to “sink or swim.” These kinds of programs are rare, as investing in young, relatively inexperienced people is risky. Krainer’s story makes us question what we’re risking by not investing in more young, dedicated, passionate scientists.

Oct 14 2016

22mins

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Rank #9: 10 – CRISPR vs Climate Change

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Much of the hype around the genome editing tool known as CRISPR focuses on its potential to cure genetic diseases. But our bodies need more than a healthy genome to survive and thrive—they also need food, and that’s where we may see CRISPR’s earliest effects on our lives. In this episode, we talk with plant scientist and Associate Professor Zach Lippman about the threats that climate change poses to agriculture, and how CRISPR could help overcome them.

Jun 14 2017

24mins

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Rank #10: 9 – Dark Matter of the Genome (part 2)

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One scientist’s junk is apparently everyone’s treasure! They just haven’t realized it yet. . . In this episode of Base Pairs, we question the mythos that is “junk DNA” and explore how and why scientists are becoming enthralled by the mysterious non-coding portions of the genome.

Apr 14 2017

25mins

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