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The Podcast on Organizational Excellence - Digital Business Best Practices

Updated 13 days ago

Rank #200 in Management category

Business
Education
Technology
Management
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This podcast covers various topics on organizational excellence including topics on business agility, digital transformation, process excellence, program management and PMO, and other quality management topics.

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This podcast covers various topics on organizational excellence including topics on business agility, digital transformation, process excellence, program management and PMO, and other quality management topics.

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Average Ratings
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Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of The Podcast on Organizational Excellence - Digital Business Best Practices

The Podcast on Organizational Excellence - Digital Business Best Practices

Latest release on Oct 14, 2019

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 13 days ago

Rank #1: Five Habits and Best Practices for Today’s Managers and Executives

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In this episode, I will cover five habits that you as a manager must adopt to stay competitive in today’s digital markets and economies. We know that competitive pressures have been building up in today’s marketplace and digital disruption has created a fast-paced environment that is challenging traditional business models and requiring organizations to transform in order for them to remain viable. Effective team leadership in this new business environment demands that managers find fresh ways to help create both business value and a rewarding experience for colleagues and team members. To do this, you as an executive and / or manager must adopting new habits to help your teams and groups achieve the flexibility required to tackle the headwinds of this new competitive climate.

Here are five of those habits:

Define Success in Terms of Business Outcomes

Whether overseeing large projects or smaller tasks, managers need to define their department’s work in the context of overall business outcomes. Examples of business outcomes are growth in sales, improved customer experience, increased productivity, and reduced process cycle times. A problem that some teams face is that they get so bogged down in addressing lower-level requirements that they lose sight of the company’s overall target outcomes. One way to fix this is to implement trace-ability mechanisms that will track the relationship of lower-level activities to larger business outcomes. This can help you to align your department or group to the organization’s overall objectives and keep your teams focused on delivering business value.

Many organizations use quantitative metrics such as Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to help their departments and managers stay focused on delivering the desired end results. However, improperly defined KPIs can have the reverse effect by obscuring the team’s ability to attain business value that’s relevant to the company’s larger goals. In such cases, you as a manager need to bring your teams back into focus by putting business outcomes in the context of overall business value. Doing this will help team members to think on a larger scale.

Thinking and communicating in terms of business outcomes also brings managers closer to their customers and stakeholders, ensuring that the department’s delivery is in line with their expectations and preventing any surprises in the future.

Create a Healthy Culture for Optimal Performance

A healthy organizational culture is a prerequisite for achieving optimal organizational performance. An organization’s culture depends on the mindset and behaviors of its employees, who take their cues from the leadership’s core beliefs, values, and practices.

As a manager, your potential for building a strong cultural foundation for your department gives you considerable influence. Among the ways of inculcating a positive culture are improving communication between team members, communicating core values to employees and practicing them yourself in your daily work, appreciating and valuing your team members’ input and efforts, and encouraging risk taking. Investing in your department’s culture will help employees feel personally fulfilled and also build trust and respect, all of which lead to a more motivated and creative staff. The positive impact on the thinking and performance of your department can only benefit the company as a whole.

Foster an Agile Mindset

Demands for speedy delivery are pushing managers to reduce cycle times across all levels of the organization. Methods such as lean and agile have proven useful in software development, manufacturing, and other organizational functions. But effective managers recognize that, more than a methodology, agile is a shift in mindset that embodies principles of incremental and iterative development, better customer alignment, and the use of feedback loops to improve products and services.

Agility in today’s environment, for example, means preferring rapid and incremental delivery of products and services with limited functionality, rather than waiting longer for hefty feature releases. In the new paradigm, failing quickly and learning from your mistakes is at times considered more desirable than engaging in extended (and sometimes indefinite) planning and analysis cycles. Managers who embrace these principles understand that being agile can help not only with working around complexities, dependencies, and uncertainties but also with ensuring rapid delivery to the marketplace.

Encourage Your Team to Think Differently

Departmental processes certainly help an organization to meet various performance objectives, but standard processes and predefined scripts cannot guarantee the successful achievement of all performance goals. Many tasks and situations require out-of-the box thinking for generating innovative ideas and solutions. Effective managers establish systems at the departmental level that encourage creativity and innovation for the purpose of tackling challenging problems and situations. Organizations like Google are known for allowing their employees free time for projects and activities unrelated to their daily work. This helps to stimulate their creativity by giving employees an opportunity to step outside the “boxes” created by repetitive daily tasks that may have caused their thinking to become too restrained.

While the value of creative thinking is well known, it’s more commonly preached than practiced. To drive such new behaviors, managers must lead both through their own focus and consistency and by fostering team collaboration and creative thinking. By instituting practices that encourage people to step away from their usual thinking patterns, managers empower team members to bring forth new ideas. Also, to ensure all ideas are given an equal chance of evaluation, many managers and organizations are now instituting more structured approaches for capturing and vetting ideas before they get lost.

Build a Learning Organization

Effective managers also create a learning organization where employees collaborate and constantly learn from each other’s experiences, thus increasing the company’s collective wisdom. According to Peter Senge, who spearheaded the concept of the “learning organization” in his book The Fifth Discipline, instead of building pockets of expertise, effective managers strive to increase the overall capabilities of their organization. Knowledge creates more knowledge, and when shared with others, it has a compounding effect so that the acquired collective wisdom is more than the sum of its parts.

Cultivating and maintaining a strong learning environment requires setting up various forms of collaboration and communication such as meetings and workshops to facilitate sharing and dissemination of information. It also requires implementing a system capable of capturing large amounts of knowledge and experience. Specific methods vary, depending on the manager and the organization’s needs. For example, an organization where sales teams shared their learning experiences from the field would require a different setup from an engineering group with a focus on learning from product development experiences.

A collective learning environment puts both managers and organizations in a better position to meet the new and constantly changing requirements of today’s business climate. Companies with this type of environment use mistakes as learning tools by capturing the lessons they provide through feedback loops and then disseminating them across the organization. An organization that only focuses on providing periodic formal training for its employees is missing out on these types of opportunities and the rapid development and growth that they bring.

So again, the five proactive habits for you to adopt as a manager in today’s economy are

  1. Tying the organization’s efforts to its larger business outcomes
  2. Encouraging optimal performance through a healthy, supportive culture
  3. Cultivating an agile approach
  4. Empowering creative thinking
  5. Fostering a collective learning environment

Finally – Remember, great managers know that change is the only constant and that a company’s greatest asset is its people. By encouraging creativity, transforming mistakes into wins, and fostering a healthy, cooperative learning environment, you can help accelerate your organization’s growth and create a rewarding experience for all involved.

— End

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Apr 12 2018

10mins

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Rank #2: A CIO’s Top 5 Priorities for Digital Transformation

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In this episode, we will cover five key priorities that an organization’s CIO or CTO should focus on to smooth their organization’s digital transformation efforts.

  • Creating a vision for the new digital platform: As CIOs play an instrumental role toward an enterprise’s digital transformation, accordingly they should also define the vision for their new digital-enabled enterprise. We know, for example, that more than offering one off digital products and services, a digital organization is realized through a larger digital ecosystem, which extends beyond the walls of the enterprise to include customers, suppliers, government regulators, and other stakeholders and partners. This ecosystem is built on digital platforms that in turn is built through various digital technologies. Building this larger ecosystem through the integration of internal systems and other digital platforms sometimes can take years and thus requires a coherent vision that the CIO must define and communicate to all parties. The vision of this platform should be sound and far reaching to support adoption of future technologies as well. Also, as the number of mergers and acquisitions have become common to adopt new business models, an organization’s digital platform should be versatile to absorb such changes.

In the context of building the right vision for an organization’s digital platform, we know that in today’s economy and digital markets an organization either creates its own digital platform to deliver digital services for its ecosystem members or uses an external digital platform to deliver its services. For example, GE has built its Predix platform to provide maintenance for its equipment that it sells to customers worldwide. It’s able to use that platform to provide services and has proved to be a major source of value for the organization. Other organizations such as Amazon have built a retail selling platform that it has opened to businesses to enable them sell their products and services through the Amazon platform. Thousands of businesses are successful due to selling on this platform. Similarly, almost every industry has organizations that have built successful digital platforms to provide services to their customers. So, part of defining a digital vision for its organization, a CIO will have to define their organization’s vision for either the development of new digital platforms or integration with ecosystems and the organization’s future position relative to that ecosystem and digital platform.

To ensure that the vision doesn’t sound as a wish or a dream, CIOs must embark on a transformation program and create and communicate a roadmap that shows the planned and progressive realization toward the new digital enterprise. The transformation roadmap should focus on all three dimension of people, process as well as technology along with working with all other stakeholders.

  • Use of analytics for business insights: The use of analytics within the enterprise has evolved to become a vital strategic tool and its use for getting business insights and making critical decisions is expected to exponentially increase over the next few years. The challenge for CIOs will be to use data and analytics effectively in all areas of the enterprise and to identify new customers and new sources of revenue, as well as understand existing customer needs and organization’s internal strengths and weaknesses. All in all, strategic use of analytics can transform the complete chain extending from customer facing systems to backend systems and processes. In fact, the use of analytics in all aspects of the enterprise will be so widespread and integral to an organization’s success that CIOs should define the vision for a larger analytics ecosystem and platform that can enable business insights at all levels of the enterprise. When defining the larger platform for analytics, CIOs not only should define and communicate the specific use cases but also link those use cases to specific business outcomes. To build such an all-encompassing vision, CIOs have to tackle a number of issues related to data quality, analytics governance, and potential applications of machine learning, and scaling the solution so it can extend beyond the enterprise to the larger ecosystem.
  • Digital platform and ecosystem Integration: As a CIO when you start building digital applications, systems, and platforms, one of the biggest challenge you may face is to ensure a smooth integration of the overall internal and external systems. This integration is vital not only to ensure that your overall ecosystem facilitates agility of processes but also ensures that your customer experience integrates smoothly with your backend systems. So, as an example, the frontend e-commerce systems that serve the end customer will integrate smoothly with the backend order fulfillment customer service systems and also that your overall supply chain systems integrate smoothly with external partners and suppliers. Building and integration of all such systems requires that your organization uses design thinking and customer journey mapping to ensure that all customers and other system users get a user friendly system that is agile, dependable, and delights your customers.
  • Adopting a Customer Obsession Strategy: As customer obsession has become an essential ingredient for the success of organizations, CIOs will have to find specific ways to include it in all aspects of their functions, processes, and products. We see how companies like Amazon have become extremely successful in building their systems and processes around their customers. CIOs today are under pressure to parallel the innovations of such digital giants. This will therefore involve factoring customer experience in the design, understanding the needs of the customers and the trends that inspire them, and then building and delivering systems that delight those customers and audiences. Transforming customer experience includes a number of facets that include capturing data across all offline and online customer touch points, understanding customer intentions and using that data to provide consistent and personalized experiences, optimizing customer journeys to increase conversion rates, and measuring all aspects of customer’s interactions with the organization. Doing such a transformation requires that the CIO creates a coherent strategy and implementation roadmap.
  • Resourcing Strategies: As IT organizations of today are transforming rapidly by piloting and implementing state of the art technologies and systems, CIOs are also facing challenges related to resourcing staff with requisite skillsets. Other than requiring resources skilled in digital technologies, many organizations also have the need for resources with legacy skillsets because those organizations still carry the baggage of mission critical legacy systems. To maintain this vast skillset portfolio of legacy and new technologies, the CIOs are already facing a shortage of skilled resources in local markets. Another challenge is that in today’s economy, resources are becoming increasingly specialized, and no longer feel the need to be tied to one organization. To tackle all these challenges, CIOs will need to adopt multiple strategies of resourcing staff both from local as well as from international markets. This resourcing strategy may include maintaining permanent staff, contracting short term resources from local markets, working with freelance staff from local and international locations, and so on. CIOs will have to know where to get these skilled resources on short notice to help them deliver on time.

In conclusion, these CIO priorities primarily centered on creating the right vision of a digital enterprise along with a proper roadmap with some strategy execution tips.

— End

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Apr 21 2018

10mins

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Rank #3: Gartner Hype Cycle – A Tool to Drive New Technology Strategy Decisions

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Watch the video below to learn more about Gartner’s Hype Cycle Tool

Authored by: Wasim 

As a technology executive, you are constantly expected to embrace new technologies and trends to help your business gain a competitive edge in your industry. How do you make those decisions, especially when the technologies in question are still new and have a greater risk associated with their adoption?

Let’s take some recent trends. A lot of enterprises are testing the waters to potentially adopt emerging technologies such as machine learning, smart robots, cognitive computing, etc. How can one get a perspective on the maturity of these technologies within enterprises in general and their future potential?

To help with these decisions, Gartner introduced its Hype Cycle tool a few years ago and is currently used by many organizations to drive their technology strategy and investment decisions. The Hype Cycle is a graphical representation of how technologies progress from conception to maturity to becoming mainstream. This tool helps technology professionals get insights on the maturity levels of various technology innovations and the market adoption path that a technology may take in the future.

Each year, Gartner releases more than 90+ Hype Cycles related to various domains. Some of the recently released Hype Cycles relate to domains, such as Emerging Technologies, Midsize Enterprises, Data Management, Digital marketing and advertising, Internet of Things (IoT), and others. An example of a Hype Cycle diagram is included below in this article. You should note that the diagram is included as part of a detailed report that Gartner issues to its members only and is not available in the public domain.

The Five Phases of the Hype Cycle

The Hype cycle (presented below) is a graphical representation that shows a new technology’s progression through five distinct phases before reaching a ‘plateau of productivity’, where it is considered mature and mainstream. The Innovation Trigger is the first phase, when a technology breakthrough creates early excitement in the market and starts to become popular. At this phase, the adoption amongst a select few early adopter organizations picks up pace. However, the products related to the technologies in this phase are still not mature and are not widespread.

The technology then reaches the next phase of Peak of Inflated Expectations, where the market’s expectations peak, and the market slowly starts to lose interest, perhaps due to the technology not living up to the hype or other reasons. As Gartner states, the only enterprises making money in this phase are conference organizers and magazine publishers. From here, due to lack of meaningful results and accompanying negative coverage, the interest and adoption slow considerably, and the technology slides down and hits the Trough of Disillusionment. Although one would think that most technologies would die in the trough, an interesting thing happens, and the interest in certain technologies starts to pick up again. This may be due to focused experimentation by some organizations that leads to a true understanding of the technology’s applicability. This is where the technology enters the phase known on the Hype Cycle as Slope of Enlightenment. From here, the benefits of the technology are widely understood, tools mature in the market, and the use of technology stabilizes and enters the phase of Plateau of Productivity.

The Use of the Hype Cycle Tool

The Hype Cycle is a useful tool, as it can help technology managers get an informed perspective before rushing to adopt new innovations or abandoning them as those technologies fail to live up to earlier touted expectations. In general, the tool can help technology executives get a perspective on the following:

  • For a given technology domain, the Hype Cycle shows multiple technologies (or items) providing a good overview of the overall domain. In many cases, this may expose managers to other innovations that may be more relevant to them and that they had not known earlier. For example, in the figure below, Gartner’s Hype Cycle for data management shows 30+ technologies.
  • Understanding the maturity state of technologies and other items on the Hype Cycle graph (emerging, adolescent etc.)
  • Reasons for which a technology is in a certain phase
  • Market penetration levels of the technology within the target audience
  • Technologies highlighted in earlier years in the Hype Cycle that may be going obsolete. Although there are no rules when this can happen during the Hype Cycle, this usually happens within the first three phases before it reaches the scope of enlightenment phase.
  • Timeframe before certain technologies are expected to become mainstream
  • Level of risk that may be associated with adopting certain technologies (depending on their position on the Hype Cycle).

Observations

The following delineate some observations related to the use of this tool.

  • For a technology to be in the trough of disillusionment doesn’t indicate that a technology may necessarily overcome the barriers and progress to the next phase, nor does it mean it will die in that phase.
  • The duration that a technology may take to progress from one phase to another varies by technology.
  • For technologies that are identified in the early phases of the cycle and highlighted to reach the plateau of productivity phase within a short time span, this may be taken as Gartner’s high confidence in the technology to become mainstream quickly. As a decision maker, this can provide you the confidence of piloting and investing in the implementation of those technologies.
  • It’s possible that a technology may become successful without hitting the trough of disillusionment, even though some argue that technologies rarely mature before going through a disillusionment phase.

Limitations

The following are some perceived limitations related to this tool.

  • The Hype Cycle report is usually industry agnostic. However, in reality, certain technologies may do better in some industries than others. While the tool can provide the right perspective and enough information to put us in the right direction, we should also look at this data by considering the industry to which our organizations belong. For example, while the ‘blockchain’ technology may be an excellent technology to trial for organizations belonging to the financial industry, others may decide to wait longer to try its benefits. This is also evidenced by the fact that most ongoing trials related to blockchain are within the financial industry. Furthermore, as an organization, you should formulate a technology selection methodology that takes into consideration factors specific to your industry.
  • The Hype cycle doesn’t provide detailed information on vendors offering products related to the various technologies. For that, organizations should consider reviewing Gartner’s Magic Quadrant tool that can help organizations assess potential suppliers and understand the competition and respective positioning.

Summary

In summary, let’s remember that while adopting newer technologies and innovations provide opportunities for competitive advantage and positioning, they have certain risks. Although tools such as Gartner’s Hype Cycle can provide useful insights related to new and emerging technologies, organizations should also review industry specific implementations before making strategic technology decisions.

— End

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Apr 12 2018

10mins

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Rank #4: Best practices for establishing an IT Steering Committee Function

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To download free reports on IT Alignment and best practices on steering committee’s role in shaping an organization’s governance framework, enter your E-mail below. You will learn the following:

  • Business strategy formulation and role of committees
  • IT strategy and IT Steering committees
  • Corporate and IT alignment issues
  • Role of steering committees in organization’s strategy formulation
  • Best Practices in establishing IT and other Corporate Steering Committees
  • and more

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In this episode, we will review some best practices related to establishing an IT Steering Committee function. An IT steering committee ensures alignment of IT and business and thus is a crucial function that is needed in organizations.

So, first, let’s take a look at what is an IT steering committee and the benefits that it serves to the organization. After that we will review some best practices related to establishing this function within an organization.

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IT steering committees bring key IT and business stakeholders in a common forum to discuss matters related to strategic planning, program planning and project and program approvals. A typical steering committee usually includes the CIO, other key members of IT management, and executives from various Lines of Businesses such as Finance, Marketing, and others. When instituted correctly, programs are strategically planned and approved mutually between both parties, and thus one can expect IT and Business alignment.

Although a number of organizations have IT steering committees in place, only a number of them are really effective. In fact, a research conducted by the Info-Tech Research Group highlighted that 88% of CIOs believe that their governance structure and processes are not effective. As IT steering committees serve as an important glue in the overall IT governance process, they can encapsulate a number of critical decision making processes and activities, especially those related to the review and approval of key technology related initiatives. Due to the criticality of this organizational function, it’s prudent therefore that organizations should invest in improving the effectiveness of these committees.

Best Practices

Here are some best practices that an organization can follow to improve their effectiveness.

  • Ensure Executive Support – One of the most important factors that contributes to the success of IT Steering committees is to ensure that they have the full backing from the CEO and LOB senior executives. Obviously, if the committee’s main function is going to be to mutually review and approve an organization’s key projects and initiatives then it must have that high-level support for it to be effective. This also ensures that both IT and business become accountable for their decisions rather than having one group blaming the other for failed IT projects and initiatives.
  • Establish a Committee Charter – One of the reasons that committees usually fail is the lack of an appropriate structure and definition of key processes that are needed for the ongoing execution of the committee functions. Therefore, one of the important steps when initiating a steering committee is to document its charter. The charter helps shape the overall governance structure, processes and roles of the committee and ensures that the committee continues to be effective. The charter should provide details such as the purpose of the committee, its scope, key roles and responsibilities of the committee members, details on various processes such as those of project approvals, ongoing deliverables, governing documents, etc.
  • Integrate committee with the organization’s PPM processes – Some organizations have Project and Portfolio Management or PPM functions in place that provide a vehicle for ideas and initiatives to be evaluated, and prioritized. The selected projects are then put through a project execution framework. In such cases, the organization should ensure to effectively integrate IT steering committee processes with the organization’s project portfolio management or PPM processes and ensure that the functions are not duplicated or missed and that the overall framework is properly defined.
  • Establish Project Prioritization and Selection Criteria – One of the most important IT and business alignment functions is that of project evaluation, prioritization, and selection. This ensures that only those projects are selected for execution that are properly aligned to an organization’s strategy. In this context, the steering committee that is made up of key members from both the IT and business should decide on certain high level criteria for project prioritization and selection to facilitate that process. This ensures that projects are evaluated objectively rather than being influenced by those with higher political clout.
  • Establish Monitoring Processes – Besides prioritizing and funding projects, an effective steering committee also establishes monitoring processes and metrics to monitor the execution of its approved projects. For monitoring of projects and programs, the committee can request the organization’s PMO to provide the right reports and visibility into the execution of the projects and programs. As mentioned earlier, when a steering committee is held accountable for its decisions, monitoring those projects becomes its top priority as well. In this context, the committee can also provide its funded projects the right support whenever they feel that the projects are deviating from achieving their intended goals.
  • Ensure Continuous improvement – Finally, as an IT Steering Committee is an important group of the organization, it’s important that its effectiveness is reviewed periodically to ensure that it’s delivering the right value for the business and the enterprise. Therefore, as part of that effort, the committee should review the effectiveness of its structure and processes and make changes as needed.

— End

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Apr 10 2018

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Rank #5: A Harvard Business Review (HBR) and Oracle Study on IT Business Alignment (Podcast)

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In this podcast episode, we will focus on the importance of the partnership between IT and business and why this partnership is quite critical for continued innovation within an organization. Although the industry has been discussing the need and importance of this partnership for a few decades now, the reality is that it continues to be a hurdle in many organizations and this in turn is impacting the pace of innovation and delivery of business outcomes.

In this digital age particularly, this partnership between IT and the Line of Businesses of organizations is even more crucial as businesses are focusing to deliver innovative and technologically advanced digital applications and services to the market at a much rapid pace than ever efore. These applications are needed in the area of improving customer experience, achieving operational excellence, improved decision making and other areas.

In this context, we can look at one study that was sponsored by Oracle with Harvard Business Review in which they surveyed business and IT departments of around 270 organizations. As a result of this study they found the criticality of this partnership and also why it is so crucial for organizations to improve their overall agility, pace and quality of innovation.

The results from this study showed the following:

  1. When organizations were asked about the number one challenge in getting innovative applications to the market, they cited lack of integration and partnership between IT and business. Other challenges that were cited included lack of IT resources, project budget, business units working in silos, and others.
  2. Only Less than 50% of the organizations and their businesses stated that IT was either responsive or somewhat responsive to the needs of the organization. So, we see that a large percentage of organizations still see a need to improve IT’s responsiveness to the business requirements.
  3. When asked about the role of an organization’s LOBs in the decision making process related to technology initiatives, almost 60% stated that they see a constant increase in the LOB’s role in such decision making. So, this highlights the importance of increasing the effectiveness of partnership between IT and LOBs.
  4. According to the study, 64 percent said that leadership’s involvement was very or extremely important in achieving software innovation. So, while in general the partnership between IT and business was seen as important, the need for the leaderships of the two sides to stay engaged was considered crucial as well.
  5. Another important finding was that for those companies where LOBs turned to external help to develop enterprise applications, their preference would have been to work with internal IT if IT had enough resources and there was less bureaucracy. But for cases where they saw dealing with IT as more challenging, they would turn to contracting external help.

In general, this lack of partnership between IT and business is the root cause behind the lack of alignment between IT and business that ends up being an impediment to successful strategy execution and business innovation. As we mentioned earlier, this results in LOBs turning to external consultants to get IT help when they see dealing with internal IT as more of a challenge. This also results in what is known as Shadow IT, where LOBs work with external cloud service providers to get IT services rather than turning to internal IT to request those services. Also, the lifecycle from product or service ideation to delivery becomes much longer due to the internal organizational silos and hurdles.

In conclusion, the following are some of the steps that organizations can take to increase collaboration between themselves.

  1. First is that CIOs need to take a leadership role in increasing the effectiveness of the partnership between business and IT. The CIOs need to work more closely with the leadership of the LOBs and they to find ways to increase the collaboration and the day to day involvement of the LOB users with IT in delivering applications internally to the organization or to the external market.
  2. The LOBs should become more proactive in communicating the business requirements to IT and to keep that pressure on IT in asking for services. This will keep IT engaged to improve the quality of their services that they provide to the business.
  3. Both IT and LOB leadership should work to bring down organizational silos and bureaucracy that discourages the two sides working with each other. One way to do this is to adopt Agile like practices where business and IT work as one team in delivering products and services.
  4. DevOps practices within IT should also be utilized as much as possible to smooth the delivery to production and to reduce introducing errors in production.
  5. Finally, CIOs also need to work internally to make IT less complex to enable innovation at a much faster pace. One way complexity can be reduced is to take an Enterprise Architecture approach and get a holistic view of the state of the enterprise’s business, its systems, data, and the business requirements driving the business and to look for ways to simplify IT to enable faster innovation.

— End

Apr 08 2018

6mins

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Rank #6: Book Review: The McKinsey Edge: Success Principles from the World’s Most Powerful Consulting Firm – Episode 107

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This episode provides a book review of the book "The McKinsey Edge: Success Principles from the World’s Most Powerful Consulting Firm". This book is authored by Shu Hattori who was a consultant at McKinsey. In less than 200 pages, the book provides 47 principles from the area of consulting gleaned from the experiences of current and former [...]

May 07 2017

6mins

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Rank #7: Best practices to increase the value of a PMO (Project Management Office) – Episode 106

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In this episode, we will look at the different ways in which PMOs or project management offices can deliver value to their respective organizations. In this context, we will look at the various sources of potential value that PMOs can tap into to not only justify their existence but also to be a strategic part [...]

May 06 2017

15mins

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Rank #8: Business agility and high performance in the enterprise – Episode 105

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This episode covers the concept of business agility in the enterprise and shows its relevance to high organizational performance and excellence.  The episode covers what it really means to be agile, discusses its importance, and see how organizations are building capabilities to become more agile to stay competitive. In this episode, I will discuss the [...]

May 06 2017

11mins

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Rank #9: A business case of successful digital transformation – NYTimes.com – Episode 104

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This episode features The New York Times (NYTimes.com) and reviews that as a business case of a successful digital transformation and highlights the lessons learned and best practices from that journey. In this episode (included at the end), we will review a business case of successful digital transformation. If you are part of an organization, [...]

May 06 2017

10mins

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Rank #10: Understanding Agile Project Management – Episode 101

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Many organizations are pursuing various agility initiatives to improve their delivery capability. In line with those trends, the concept of "Agile Project Management" has also taken root in the industry as a strategy to pursue organizational excellence. This podcast episode reviews the concept of Agile project management and contrasts it with traditional project management. What is Agile Project Management? [...]

May 04 2017

14mins

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