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VernissageTV Art TV

Updated 3 months ago

Arts
Education
Society & Culture
Visual Arts
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the window to the art world

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the window to the art world

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7 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Very well done

By Saynt305 - Dec 10 2009
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Keep it up. I hope to see more videos. Great coverage of Art Basel Miami Beach.

VTV is serious fun!

By Art Dirt - May 06 2009
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VTV is simply the best internet TV show about Art World events and people. It's always interesting and high quality.

iTunes Ratings

7 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
1
0
2
0

Very well done

By Saynt305 - Dec 10 2009
Read more
Keep it up. I hope to see more videos. Great coverage of Art Basel Miami Beach.

VTV is serious fun!

By Art Dirt - May 06 2009
Read more
VTV is simply the best internet TV show about Art World events and people. It's always interesting and high quality.

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Cover image of VernissageTV Art TV

VernissageTV Art TV

Updated 3 months ago

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the window to the art world

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Marco Schuler: Orbi / Schlossberg Staufen

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In 2012, the German artist Marco Schuler created a monumental wooden object for Mount Belchen in the Black Forest in Germany. Thanks to the mediation of the Gallery Fluchtstab (Elmar Bernauer) and the courtesy of the property owners, the sculpture is now on loan to the city of Staufen (Breisgau, Germany) on the Schlossberg of the city. The five meter high tower-like object was installed halfway to the city castle. On 28 September, the sculpture was handed over to the city in the presence of Mayor Michael Benitz and art historian Dr. Markus Ewel. Marco Schuler says of his work: “Like an inaccessible guard house, the sculpture will stand in front of the pedestrian on the way to the castle. Seen from above, the angular giant will look like a friendly childlike box looking in all four directions. So: “Keep your eyes open in all four directions, stay open and free upwards, have your point of view, direct your gaze to what is beautiful and good, and keep the secret that you are!

Marco Schuler: Orbi / Schlossberg Staufen. Vernissage, September 28, 2019.

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Nov 01 2019

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Takesada Matsutani: Yohaku / Hauser & Wirth Zürich

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The exhibition Takesada Matsutani: Yohaku at Hauser & Wirth Zürich presents the artist’s explorations of monochromes from the 1970s to the present day. The solo show includes important works on paper, multi-media paintings and drawings. It follows the first major survey of Takesada Matsutani’s work at the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Takesada Matsutani was born in Osaka in 1937. He began exhibiting with the Gutai Group in 1960, along with Shūji Mukai and Tsuyoshi Maekawa, and officially joined the group in 1963. In 1966, he received a grant from the French government after winning first prize in the 1st Mainichi Art Competition, and subsequently moved to Paris where he continues to live and work today.

Takesada Matsutani: Yohaku / Hauser & Wirth Zürich. Vernissage, October 10, 2019.

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Press text:

The title of the exhibition makes reference to a concept borrowed from Chinese and Japanese painting. ‘Yohaku’ describes a space intentionally left blank, which by extension serves to balance a composition. From as early as the 10th-century in China, landscape painters would use black ink to capture the ‘spirit’ of the surrounding landscape, leaving other areas untouched to depict clouds, mist, sky and water. The prominent Zen painters in Japan would use blank space in their paintings to represent the weight of ‘nothingness’. This sense of working with the seen and unseen is at the centre of much of Takesada Matsutani’s oeuvre, especially in his experiments with ink. A particular influence of Matsutani’s was the 16th-century Japanese master Tōhaku Hasegawa, whose pine tree ink paintings are amongst some of the most renowned examples of ‘yohaku’, and gave the artist a clear idea of what he hoped to create in his own work.

From the early 1960s until the 1970s, Matsutani was a key member of the ‘second generation’ of the influential post war Japanese art collective, the Gutai Art Association. As part of the Gutai group, Matsutani experimented with vinyl glue, using fans and his own breath to manipulate the substance, creating bulbous and sensuous forms. Matsutani moved to Paris in 1966, and after the group disbanded in 1972, the artist eased into a radical yet consistent new body of work. He states: ‘By joining the group almost 10 years after it was started, I was convinced that artistically I had to go beyond Gutai, beyond what the group had already accomplished.’

Living in Paris in the 1970s with limited resources, Matsutani was compelled to reconsider the essential tools of art-making. The inexpensive materials of graphite and paper allowed the artist to discover the elementary and immediate technique of black and white drawing. Matsutani began creating vast expanses of black graphite on mural-sized sheets of paper, built up stroke upon stroke, known as his Stream series. The artist was exploring what surface could emerge out of an accumulation of this medium – a practice he has continued over the last 40 years. This ritualised manner of mark-making has a performative nature, thus presenting a time-based record of his gestures (often likened to the Japanese tradition of diary-making). These processes have been translated into an artistic language that is uniquely his own.

The first Streams were small format drawings, later evolving into impressive installations, of which the latest and most monumental were presented at the 2017 Venice Biennale, and at Matsutani’s first major retrospective in France at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. The work from the Pompidou is installed once more at Hauser & Wirth Zürich. Matsutani creates a rich, dark accretion of pencil strokes upon two rolls of 10 x 2.15 metres of canvas through patient, repetitive movements. His Stream works, according to the artist are ‘like a moving, flowing river. The idea of a river is that it is always changing, where each atom is in perpetual motion, with no beginning and no end’. Matsutani’s relationship to Zen Buddhism in his practice demonstrates a rekindling of Japanese culture and the meditative processes of his art-making reveal a profound affinity with this philosophy. His Stream series particularly explores the notion that existence is a moving current – a permanent state of flux. In other works from the series, the artist dilutes the graphite with turpentine, often to reveal the white paper or canvas underneath. Through the exposed white space, ‘yohaku’ infuses a vital breath in what the artist considers to be an avocation of life.

The artist’s Wave series from the late 1990s continues to experiment with the immediate application of layering graphite in order to delve into the material’s intrinsic qualities. Many works from the Waves series are covered entirely with graphite, however in some, such as ‘Wave 99-1’ (1999) and ‘Wave 99-8-26’ (1999), the unfilled surfaces intensify its presence, creating a precarious balance between black and white. In a number of Matsutani’s later drawings, precise black graphite lines and grids are divided by strokes of light, tearing through the dark areas like a thunderstorm.

Matsutani enhances his monochromatic visual language by using vinyl adhesive to cover the canvas, which is then masked with layers of graphite, uniting the artist’s signature media. Later important pieces in the exhibition include the artist’s Dance works from 2014. The use of vinyl glue harks back to his earliest experiments with the material as part of the Gutai group. In ‘Dance 14-2’, Matsutani’s bulbous forms covered in graphite are then diluted to create swirling, sensuous shapes, evoking the idea of a playful dance and musicality. Alluding to ‘yohaku no bi’ in Japanese aesthetics, this swirling veil of movement can be seen as an ambiguous space which helps to express the remaining empty areas, unleashing the viewer’s imagination. Like many of Matsutani’s compositions in the exhibition, these later works are poised in a fluid exchange between light and dark, revealing the beauty of the unworked, abundant white space.

Oct 30 2019

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Nick Sethi: welcome2you / The Community at Salon de Normandy, Paris

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At the Salon de Normandy by The Community in Paris that runs concurrently to FIAC art fair, the collective-run platform The Community presents “welcome2you”, a solo show by Nick Sethi. Here’s more info about the exhibition:

“Nick Sethi is an artist and photographer living in NYC. His work focuses on the ever-changing meanings and relationships of ideas, images, people, and materials over time as they move through both physical and digital space. Nick’s recently released book, Khichdi (Kitchari), published by Dashwood Books, chronicles 10 years of his photography in India, exploring a decade of changes in the country, as well as himself. He has recently collaborated with Hood By Air and Helmut Lang, as well as being featured in Aperture Magazine’s Future Gender Issue. His recent editorial clients include Kaleidoscope, Dazed, Let’s Panic, Marfa Journal, i-D, Vice, and Office Magazine. In addition, he worked with 8-Ball zines to produce a zine fair, as well as The Newsstand, an artist run zine shop in the NYC subway, which was since acquired by and shown at MOMA as part of the New Photography 2015 show.

The Community by Aapo Nikkanen, Benjamin Pöntinen, Jussi Kantonen, Osma Harvilahti, Sini Rinne-Kanto, Tuomas Autio and Tuukka Laurila. The Community is a collective-run platform for multidisciplinary exchange.”

Nick Sethi: welcome2you / The Community at Salon de Normandy, Paris. October 17, 2019.

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Oct 28 2019

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Oskar Schlemmer: Bauhaus Dances / Frieze London 2019

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As part of Frieze London’s Live program, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac presents Oskar Schlemmer’s Bauhaus Dances / Bauhaustänze. Schlemmer (1888-1943) was a German painter, sculptor, designer and choreographer. He was Master of Form at the Bauhaus theatre workshop. Famous works are his Treppenszene (Stairway Scene), 1932, and Triadisches Ballett (Triadic Ballet), an avant-garde artistic dance that premiered in 1922.

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“Oskar Schlemmer’s Bauhaus Dances | Bauhaustänze have had a profound influence on performance art and contemporary dance. These experimental dances were originally informal manifestations of instructional courses with students under Schlemmer’s direction at the Stage Workshop at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau from 1923 to 1929.

In Bauhaus Dances | Bauhaustänze, dancers mathematically explore space, form and materials, accompanied by music composed by Schlemmer. Maintaining continuous dialogue with his painting and sculptural work, these dances explore and perform Schlemmer’s purest concepts of abstraction, structured around the human form of the dancer, at the centre and measure of all things.” (Performance description)

Oskar Schlemmer: Bauhaus Dances / Bauhaustänze, 1925-1929. Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Frieze London Live, London (UK), October 2, 2019.

Complete video (18:16 min.):

Oskar Schlemmer (Born in 1888, Stuttgart; Died in 1943, Baden-Baden) is internationally acclaimed for his dance creations The Triadic Ballet, (1916 – 1932), The Figural Cabinet (1922-1929), Bauhaus Dances (1925-1929); paintings Bauhaus Staircase, (1932), exhibited at MoMA, New York and Five Figures in a Room, Roman, (1925) at Kunstmuseum Basel; his sculpture Abstract Figure (1921-1923) at The Art Institute Chicago; theoretical drawings on the human measurements and condition in relation to space; stage sets and costumes, for Les Noces, Le Rossignol, Renard by Igor Stravinsky; his teaching at the Bauhaus; and his diaries and writings on art.

Dance, costumes and music by Oskar Schlemmer
Art director: C. Raman Schlemmer
Dancers: Olivia Grassot, Oscar Jinghu Li, Kennedy Junior Muntanga,
Musician: Vincenzo Pasquariello
Costume Consultant : Ilaria Martello
Co-production of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac and Bühnen Archiv Oskar Schlemmer

Oct 25 2019

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Scoli Acosta: Orpheus Hot / Orpheus Cold at Galerie Laurent Godin Paris

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Scoli Acosta’s solo exhibition Orpheus Hot/Orpheus Cold at Galerie Laurent Godin is based on the mobile Night, which was considered from the beginning as a keystone of the project and was made from enlarged images of skateboarders’ hands in mid-flight.

Scoli Acosta was born in 1973 in Los Angeles, where he lives and works. Winner of the Perrier-Jouët Prize for Best Artist in 2008 at the ZOO ART FAIR (London), he graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute (1994) and the Ultimate Akademie, Cologne (1997). Scoli Acosta has been the subject of several solo exhibitions : Museum of Contemporary Art of San Diego 2013 ; Armory Center for the Art, Pasadena, California, 2011 ; FRAC Basse Normandie, 2011 ; Laxart Los Angeles.

His artworks can be found in the collections of the LACMA, Los Angeles ; Jumex Colección, Mexico ; MOMA, New York ; Rubell Family Collection, Miami ; FRAC Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur ; FRAC Pays de la Loire, Crac.

Scoli Acosta: Orpheus Hot / Orpheus Cold. Galerie Laurent Godin. Paris, October 17, 2019.

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From the press release:

Scoli Acosta is a storyteller, hunter and finder of objects. He was born in the “Golden State”, Los Angeles, California, land of abundance.

Marked by a strong ecological awareness, his work is built on what he defines as an “aesthetics of resourcefulness”. Rooted in the quotidian, he works with what he finds: recovers, transforms and readapts objects as well as their stories and implied narratives…

Generally doing everything himself with a sensitivity and handmade precision, he developed an organic creative process in which each work calls to mind the next, improbable and magical relationships are woven and highlight the intertwined nature of things and situations. His work emerges as a personal and delicate poetics of the ordinary while taking on the structure of a dream.

The exhibition Orpheus Hot/Orpheus Cold is based on the mobile Night, which was considered from the beginning as a keystone of the project and was made from enlarged images of skateboarders’ hands in mid-flight. The hands, cut out of magazines with scissors, scanned, printed on canvas and stretched on drums, speak for the whole body, they are where they should be, in balance, with the whole, as a mobile often is.

« Having to traverse one room to enter the other made me think of a journey. Traversing Night (mobile) can only lead to the day and vice versa, metaphorically as well as literally. A journey, the mythic journey of Orpheus, traversing the underworld in an attempt to retrieve his love, Eurydice…slowly waking and hearing yourself tell the barista your name is Orpheus. »

The broken rearview mirror in Over/Under/Under/Over is an allusion to the moment when Orpheus, leaving the underworld, turns around and thus condemns Eurydice to remain there. The hand, as if echoing the Night (mobile), seems to come from one room to the other, from the darkness to the world of light.

The work Hades Cornucopia creates a new link within the exhibition. This revered 19th century death mask originally called “L’Inconnue de la Seine” seems like a fitting stand-in for the character of Eurydice. Having been found in the Seine river, no one claimed her body but she was found to be so beautiful, a death mask was made of her and she soon became a popular item for the artists of the time and can be found immortalized in the work of Rilke and Man Ray. In the 50’s this anonymous face became the model for Resusci Anne the CPR doll one practices on to try to bring back to life. The horn or cornucopia attached to her head, symbol of Hades also evokes the ear trumpet that would be used to aid in hearing, in this case she could be listening for the songs of Orpheus…

« The parchment paintings began as a reflection on painted or drawn surfaces and the stretched canvas in particular. They seemed medieval to me once I painted the outline of the parchment and that reminded me of when I lived in Germany in the mid-1990s. During a solar eclipse, I found the people around me coating pieces of glass with candle soot in order to use them as a filter to look directly at the sun. This also seemed medieval to me.

I decided to start each parchment painting with a circle of gold leaf and cover it with candle soot. I then spit on it as a kind of activation of the surface and I use the soot and spit as a drawing material. The idea has evolved and now, I also start with silver leaf circles in reference to the moon. Initially, I wanted these soot and gold leaf paintings to be small poems, but they’ve become pictorial as well. »

The exhibition is crossed by several dichotomies, man and woman, hot and cold, night and day… For instance, the Sum of Its Parts, composed of the meeting of two pentagons (one black and one white) leads to the creation of a third element as when two opposing powers meet. Hearth Spring is a golden box spiked by straws and cigarette butts, synthesizing two of the most elemental and basic of gathering places, fire and water…

The two bust paintings focus on the exchange of the inside and outside of the body with a special attention to the neck or throat. Collars or necklaces delineate the space where we vocalize our internal ideas and the breath makes the transition from outside to inside and inside to outside. Sometimes losing the difference between the two as in the painting of the sun setting over the ocean (Sans Soleil Sold Out, SAMO Pier (collar)), or the internal relief of an effervescent aspirin making the world slightly easier to bear (Effervescent (collar)).

Oct 22 2019

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