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Artelligence Podcast

Updated 10 days ago

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The Artelligence Podcast unpacks the mysteries of the global art market through interviews with collectors, dealers, auction house specialists, lawyers, art advisors and the myriad individuals who make the art market a beguiling mixture of sublime beauty and commercial acumen.

Read more

The Artelligence Podcast unpacks the mysteries of the global art market through interviews with collectors, dealers, auction house specialists, lawyers, art advisors and the myriad individuals who make the art market a beguiling mixture of sublime beauty and commercial acumen.

iTunes Ratings

25 Ratings
Average Ratings
15
5
2
1
2

iTunes Ratings

25 Ratings
Average Ratings
15
5
2
1
2
Cover image of Artelligence Podcast

Artelligence Podcast

Latest release on May 13, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 10 days ago

Rank #1: Adam Lindemann on Buying and Selling at Auction

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Adam Lindemann regales Sarah Douglas, Editor-in-Chief of ARTnews, with his stories and adventures on the art auction market. Lindemann explains the strategies he uses to approach estimates, reserves, guarantees and private sales. One of the most successful sellers at auction, Lindemann set the record price for a living artist in 2007 when he sold Jeff Koons's Hanging Heart for $23m. He succeeded again when his Jean-Michel Basquiat painting sold for a record price of $57m.

Nov 13 2019

40mins

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Rank #2: Mnuchin Gallery Frieze Masters Show of David Smith, The Forgings

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Peter Stevens, Executive Director of the David Smith Estate, joins Robert Mnuchin and Sukanya Rajaratnam of Mnuchin Gallery to discuss their show at Frieze Masters of David Smith, The Forgings.

Sep 30 2014

24mins

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Rank #3: Christie's Education Panel: Selling Art in the Digital Age

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Vivian Brodie, Christie's Head of Mid-Season and Online sales; Elena Soboleva, Director of Online Sales, David Zwirner; and Sam Orlofsky, Director, Gagosian discuss their experiences extending sales from their globally branded enterprises into the digital domain.

Among the topics we cover in this panel discussion is the different ways that Christie's, Zwirner and Gagosian have come to selling digitally; how the sales process is integrated into the larger pattern of client acquisition and sales; who benefits internally from digital sales and how the companies are charting a path forward.

Feb 14 2019

1hr 20mins

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Rank #4: Olyvia Kwok

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Olyvia Kwok is the principal of Willstone Management, an art investment and advisory firm in London and New York. Here, Kwok discusses her business and her views on artists and the art market.

Dec 16 2014

30mins

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Rank #5: Hrag Vartanian of Hyperallergic, James Tarmy of Bloomberg and Brian Boucher of Artnet

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Hrag Vartanian of Hyperallergic describes his trip to LA for a series of art fairs including the LA Art Book Fair and ArtLA Contemporary; James Tarmy of Bloomberg and Brian Boucher from Artnet News talk about the New York Old Master sales.

Feb 04 2015

32mins

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Rank #6: David Norman Discusses the November 2016 New York Impressionist and Modern sales

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David Norman delves into his 30 years experience as a top specialist in Impressionist and Modern art to discuss in this podcast sponsored by Christie's Education New York the results of the November sales in New York.

*Norman explains the backstory behind Wassily Kandinksy's Rigide et courbé and the not-easy decision to guarantee a post-Bauhaus Kandinsky at that level.

* Norman offers some of the market history behind Edvard Munch's Girls on the Bridge.

*We learn more about how the changing tastes have effected the prices for Monet's gainstacks.

*Also discussed here are many works that were previously offered nearly a generation ago that failed to find buyers but now achieved major prices, as well as surprises for Miro, Chagall, Picasso and others.

Jan 04 2017

59mins

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Rank #7: David Norman on London's Impressionist & Modern Sales, March 2017

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David Norman looks at the results of the March 2017 auctions of Impressionist and Modern art at Sotheby's and Christie's. The surprisingly strong sales came in the context of a nervous art market wondering what the future might hold.

In part because of that uncertainty, few of the works on offer were considered the kinds of trophies that would motivate bidders to aggressively pursue these works. Nonetheless, they did. Buyers, especially from Asia, were out in force.

Although, as Norman points out, the bidding was tactical and sober. Buyers are keen on acquiring works of art but not at any price.

With that in mind, Norman follows up on the previous sales of many of the works and points out that very few of the works auctioned in this March cycle lacked market exposure. Some did well against previous prices; others fared poorly. But the market showed that it could distribute familiar material efficiently and with strong prices even if the sales lacked an estate or other fresh material that might excite "animal spirits."

Mar 23 2017

55mins

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Rank #8: Marisa Kayyem on the Convergence of Art and Fashion

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"It's easier to know what bag to pick up for a lot of people than it is to know what art to pick."

Marisa Kayyem, program director for Christie's Continuing Education, talks about the ways in which art and fashion have grown to depend upon each other more and more.

In this conversation she talks about:

*Why brands are in search of the "new" and what they find in art.

*The trend toward luxury retailers using art to create unique spaces.

*Fashion shows as performance art.

* Historical links between fashion and artists like Schiaparelli and Salvador Dalí.

*The controversy surrounding Cecil Beaton's Vogue photoshoot in front Jackson Pollock's work.

Jan 10 2017

36mins

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Rank #9: Michael FIndlay on Seeing Slowly

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Michael Findlay, the author of The Value of Art, has a new book out about changing the way we approach a work of art. In Seeing Slowly, Findlay suggests we put our experience of the art itself first. Ignore the wall labels, avoid pontificating to your companion and simply look at the art informed by own connoisseurship, the experience of having looked at art in the past, and your own cultural awareness.

In this podcast, Findlay explains what he means and why he thinks we would all be better off approaching art this way. Then he talks about Instagram and the way that the business of selling art has changed—and how buyers and sellers would benefit from seeing slowly.

Oct 17 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #10: Timothy Taylor on Alex Katz, Ding Yi and Running a Global Art Gallery

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Timothy Taylor has a space in New York that measures 16 x 34 feet. The intimacy of the gallery appealed to his artist Alex Katz who helped create a show around one of his student sketchbooks. The small works set in a small space offer a very different experience of the artist known for his work at scale.

In this podcast, Timothy Taylor talks about the changing ways in which art dealers must operate to represent their artists well while coping with the constraints of ever-rising retail space rents in major metropolitan centers and the growing interest in art from collectors in far-flung cities across Asia and the West.

Taylor, who has just opened a show of Ding Yi's new work in his London space, has also brought Alex Katz and Sean Scully to China. He sees the way that dealers represent their artists requires thinking creatively and hints that the future of art dealing may already be upon us.

Jun 05 2017

37mins

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Rank #11: Marc Porter: Behind the Scenes at the Rockefeller Sale

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The Peggy and David Rockefeller collection is likely to be the most valuable single-owner sale in history. The great breadth of the Rockefeller collection—with extraordinary examples of French, German and American painting—furniture, ceramics and other decorative objects—will be on view at Christie's Rockefeller Center headquarters in late April with a series of auctions held the first week in May.

In this podcast, Marc Porter, Chairman of Christie's Americas, discusses the unique opportunities and challenges of organizing and marketing the estate of one of the world's most famous families. From China to Europe to the Gulf States to the UK and America, Christie's has tailored its marketing and publicity to the attributes of the Rockefeller family and the collection that are key to exciting the interest of each of these distinct populations.

Porter goes further to tell some of the history of the Rockefeller's collecting experiences and the goals of the estate.

Apr 03 2018

51mins

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Rank #12: Loretta Wurtenberger describes turning the Hans Arp estate in a new direction

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“Sell as little as possible but as much as necessary.” --Loretta Wurtenberger on the Arp estate's guiding principle.

Loretta Wurtenberger is one of the founders of the Institute for Artists’ Estates (http://www.artists-estates.com/)and has been managing the estate of Hans Arp since 2009.

The prospect of managing artists’ estates has become a new topic lately, so we’re presenting the audio of Dr. Wurtenberger’s talk from the Keeping the Legacy Alive conference held in Berlin in September of 2016.

Entitled Back to Square One, Wurtenberger’s talk describes the seven-year odyssey the Hans Arp estate made from controversy over posthumous casts to a vibrant discussion of the artist in the academic world, museums and on the art market.

The talk begins with a brief biography of Arp, the conditions of the from Arp’s death in 1966 through the mismanagement of a German dealer and the controversies surround posthumous castings.

In 2009, when Wurtenberger took over the the strategic management of the estate, Arp was out of fashion. There was no academic interest; the Catalogue Raisonné was out dated; the last US exhibition of the artist had been in the 1980s; and Arp’s work was undervalued on the art market.

Wurtenberger helped the foundation focus on repositioning Arp through sponsoring academic research, enabling museum exhibitions not only of the best known blockbuster works by Arp but also of the lesser known works held by the estate, and by enhancing the artist’s market in Europe and the US.

Finally, Wurtenberger explains that the Arp foundation is not legally allowed to have an endowmen t. So it must sell from its holdings enough each year to cover the annual expenses.

Feb 01 2017

40mins

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Rank #13: Pamela Joyner and Sarah Douglas at the CORE Club

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Pamela Joyner's collection of abstract art by African-American artists includes some of the giants of the field like Alma Thomas, Jack Whitten and Sam Gilliam. Her collecting focuses on supporting scholarship as much as acquiring and donating important works by African American artists to institutions like the Tate Modern in Britain.

Dec 05 2019

45mins

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Rank #14: Mark Lurie on Codex, the Blockchain and the Art Market

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Mark Lurie is the founder of Lofty, a seller of art and collectibles online that he sold a little over a year ago. Since then, Mark, who has worked as a venture captialist as well as a founder, saw the natural fit between the art market and blockchain technology. His new venture Codex seeks to create an title registry for the art market. But Codex is more than that. It seeks to be a foundational technology for many different businesses and services in the art market. In this podcast, Mark explains his vision of the future of the art market and how we'll get there.

Feb 07 2018

36mins

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Rank #15: Amy Cappellazzo on Barkley Hendricks

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Amy Cappellazzo talks about her record setting sales of three works by Barkley Hendricks, the recently deceased artist whose unique portrait style, developed in the 1960s and 70s, has been gaining attention for the last decade since the Nasher Museum held a retrospective of his work called, The Birth of Cool.

In this podcast, Cappellazzo talks about having encountered the artists work and then getting the rare opportunity a few decades later to sell three works from one collection as it came to market.

Faced with a series of choices about how to position and market the work, Cappellazzo walks us through her thinking and strategy. The record prices ultimately achieved were the product of a combination of cultivating new buyers, personal selling and the value of a sense of discovery.

Jun 26 2017

25mins

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Rank #16: Mike Tansey and Barry Ellsworth on Art Dealing in Santa Fe

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Santa Fe, NM has long been a center of the visual arts in the United States. For more than a century, modern artists have retreated to the dry climate. The region is also home to a rich array of native and Spanish artists and artisans that have attracted visitors for hundreds of years.

With a large number of vacation homes and occasional visitors, a long-running international opera that attracts foreign visitors and being a major tourist have made Santa Fe a magnet for art dealers as well as art buyers.

There are more than 200 galleries in the city spread across four major neighborhoods. SITE Santa Fe, a national and international Contemporary art venue, re-opens in expanded form this Fall.

Mike Tansey and Barry Ellsworth are two prominent gallerists in the city, they talk about the culture of art dealing in Santa Fe.

May 10 2017

40mins

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Rank #17: Megan Fox Kelly, Todd Levin and William O'Reilly on Giving Advice in the Global Art Market

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As part of an international program to celebrate the gallery’s 25th Anniversary, Dickinson held a panel discussion at their New York space during Spring TEFAF. Conversation centered on the multiplicity of sources of advice in the art market and how collectors can be best served as they seek to acquire art.

On the panel are Megan Fox Kelly, President of the Association of Professional Art Advisors and an advisor with a broad practice that includes helping new collectors to find their bearings in the art market and advising artist's estates and foundations on a market-facing strategy; Todd Levin, who has built noteworthy collections that have achieved verifiable market successes as well as curated his own shows at various galleries in New York, Los Angeles and Berlin; and William O'Reilly, Senior Director with Dickinson in New York where he works with collectors of Old Master through to Contemporary Art.

The lively conversation explores the relationship between advisors, collectors and the art market ecosystem, and the joys and pitfalls of building a collection.

Jul 16 2018

1hr 4mins

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Rank #18: The Business of Art: Yieldstreet x Athena Art Finance at The Armory Show

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At the 2020 Armory Show Art Fair, three entrepreneurs—Yieldstreet's Co-Founder and President Michael Weisz, PRZM Co-Founder Larry Milstein and Athena Art Finance's CIO Cynthia Sachs—got together to talk about the challenges to building a business in the creative industries. Milstein's PRZM guides companies through the complexities of marketing to Gen Z consumers who prize experiences and cultural property in ways that are novel and rapidly expanding. Sachs has built Athena into the leading non-recourse lender in the art finance category. Now owned by Yieldstreet and benefiting from the capital sourced through Yieldstreet's platform, Athena provides art collectors and dealers with a different model for managing the capital and liquidity requirements of owning art. Weisz shared his experiences in building the Yieldstreet platform and vision for the future of finance.

Mar 25 2020

52mins

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Rank #19: Richard Wright

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Richard Wright, founder of the design and Contemporary art auction house Wright, speaks about his 14 years in the business, the growth of the design market and his expansion to New York.

Jun 09 2014

28mins

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Rank #20: Stefania Bortolami

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Elena Platonova sits down with Stefania Bortolami to talk about her new gallery in Tribeca, Daniel Buren's show inaugurating the space and her ambitious plan to get art across America including into former fast food outlets.

In this podcast, Bortolami and Platonova discuss:

*Has Chelsea left galleries no more room for error?

*Will TriBeCa take over from the Lower East Side as the next gallery neighborhood?

*Daniel Buren—"the Stripe Guy"—his latest exhibition and his career?

*Her program to bring art exhibitions to cities around the US. Next up, New Haven's remarkable Marcel Breuer masterpiece.

May 25 2017

34mins

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