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We Are Rivers

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To further the conversation about the value and complexity of rivers, American Rivers launched our podcast series, “We are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us.”“We Are Rivers” takes it’s listeners on a journey to tell the stories of rivers and the important relationship they have with us. It explores the culture and history of the west and our nation by talking with adventurers, writers, water experts, and artists about their connection to rivers, and how they impact their lives. The podcast series covers a wide array of topics across the Colorado Basin and other rivers across the country. American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 250,000 members, supporters and volunteers.Annemarie Lewis writes and hosts our American Rivers podcast series, "We Are Rivers," while attending college in Colorado Springs. She started making podcasts about water conservation while in high school and plans on, "Living a life full of water conservation advocacy." Her hobbies include backpacking, climbing, river running, and amateur piano playing. Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.

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To further the conversation about the value and complexity of rivers, American Rivers launched our podcast series, “We are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us.”“We Are Rivers” takes it’s listeners on a journey to tell the stories of rivers and the important relationship they have with us. It explores the culture and history of the west and our nation by talking with adventurers, writers, water experts, and artists about their connection to rivers, and how they impact their lives. The podcast series covers a wide array of topics across the Colorado Basin and other rivers across the country. American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 250,000 members, supporters and volunteers.Annemarie Lewis writes and hosts our American Rivers podcast series, "We Are Rivers," while attending college in Colorado Springs. She started making podcasts about water conservation while in high school and plans on, "Living a life full of water conservation advocacy." Her hobbies include backpacking, climbing, river running, and amateur piano playing. Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.

iTunes Ratings

24 Ratings
Average Ratings
23
0
1
0
0

Interesting for everyone

By presslrj - Apr 10 2019
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I recently found We Are Rivers after reading Where the Water Goes by David Owens. While I live in Ohio, I still feel a sense of responsibility to understand past, present and future water issues and conservation efforts specific to the desert southwest. Annemarie does a wonderful job of educating the listener about the Colorado River Basin, and explains how we ended up where we are today, along with efforts we need to make to ensure the future sustainability of water in the southwest.

Binge-listen worthy

By heyswedishfish - Aug 30 2018
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Just discovered this podcast and am nearly all the way through all 12 episodes created to date. I enjoy the mix of historical background, politics, personal story, and activism. Though it may lean a little to the conservationist side (which speaks to me), it’s generally unbiased and provides a god comprehensive viewpoint. Would love to learn more about other river basins going through the same struggles.

iTunes Ratings

24 Ratings
Average Ratings
23
0
1
0
0

Interesting for everyone

By presslrj - Apr 10 2019
Read more
I recently found We Are Rivers after reading Where the Water Goes by David Owens. While I live in Ohio, I still feel a sense of responsibility to understand past, present and future water issues and conservation efforts specific to the desert southwest. Annemarie does a wonderful job of educating the listener about the Colorado River Basin, and explains how we ended up where we are today, along with efforts we need to make to ensure the future sustainability of water in the southwest.

Binge-listen worthy

By heyswedishfish - Aug 30 2018
Read more
Just discovered this podcast and am nearly all the way through all 12 episodes created to date. I enjoy the mix of historical background, politics, personal story, and activism. Though it may lean a little to the conservationist side (which speaks to me), it’s generally unbiased and provides a god comprehensive viewpoint. Would love to learn more about other river basins going through the same struggles.

Listen to:

Cover image of We Are Rivers

We Are Rivers

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

To further the conversation about the value and complexity of rivers, American Rivers launched our podcast series, “We are Rivers: Conversations about the Rivers that Connect Us.”“We Are Rivers” takes it’s listeners on a journey to tell the stories of rivers and the important relationship they have with us. It explores the culture and history of the west and our nation by talking with adventurers, writers, water experts, and artists about their connection to rivers, and how they impact their lives. The podcast series covers a wide array of topics across the Colorado Basin and other rivers across the country. American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 250,000 members, supporters and volunteers.Annemarie Lewis writes and hosts our American Rivers podcast series, "We Are Rivers," while attending college in Colorado Springs. She started making podcasts about water conservation while in high school and plans on, "Living a life full of water conservation advocacy." Her hobbies include backpacking, climbing, river running, and amateur piano playing. Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.

Rank #1: Episode 2: The Law of The River

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More than a century ago, populations across the west were booming. The seven states dependent on the Colorado River recognized the need to formally divide it, ensuring everyone received an appropriate amount of water. Ratified in 1922, the Colorado River Compact marked the beginning of how and why the Colorado River is managed as it is today.

But the Compact is only one thread in a much larger story. Because the whole basin’s demand for water is higher than what it can supply, the Colorado River has become both one of the most stringently managed, as well as aggressively disputed, rivers in the world. There are numerous other compacts, federal laws, court decisions, decrees, contracts, and guidelines that have been developed since the 1922 compact that dictate the challenging management of the Colorado River; these are collectively known as the "Law of the River.”

Photo Credit: Sinjin Eberle

Aug 01 2017

23mins

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Rank #2: Episode 4: Beauty And Risk In The Grand Canyon

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The Grand Canyon is one of our greatest symbols of the values of wild nature. The canyon represents more than 1.7 billion years of geologic time and is home to wildlife from the bighorn sheep to the endangered humpback chub. Dozens of creeks, springs, and tributaries connect with the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, including the Little Colorado, Kanab Creek, Havasu Creek, and Bright Angel Creek.

However, the Grand Canyon is at risk. Threats to the canyon’s seeps, springs, and wildlife include legacy uranium mining claims, the substantial expansion of Tusayan a high desert village, increased air traffic at the lower end of the canyon, and the potential for a gondola shuttling nearly 10,000 people from the rim down to the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers. These threats against the canyon are hard to believe – and while the National Park status does protect it in many ways, substantial risks still exist to the cultural and biological relevance of the confluence, to each of the canyon’s towering rims, to the skies above, and the ancient groundwater below the very surface of the earth.

Listen to Episode 4: Beauty and Risk in the Grand Canyon of We Are Rivers today and take action ! Speak up to protect the Grand Canyon today against these and future threats at www.AmericanRivers.org/grandcanyon.

Photo Credit: Annemarie Lewis, Confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers

Sep 06 2017

40mins

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Rank #3: Episode 14: Colorado River Compact Call Part 1 – What Could A Call Mean

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In mid-December, stakeholders from across the Colorado River basin gathered in Las Vegas for the annual Colorado River Water Users Association (CRUWA) conference to discuss happenings within the Colorado River basin. At this year's conference, the focus was on the Drought Contingency Plans (one for the Upper Basin and one for the Lower Basin) which help to deal with the very real possibility of shortages in the water supply of the Colorado River. At CRUWA, both the Upper and Lower Basin States agreed to move forward toward the completion of a Drought Contingency Plan (DCP).

The driving force behind the Upper Basin DCP is the need to reduce the increasing risk of a compact driven curtailment or cut to water users in the Upper Basin States. This scenario is also referred to as a “Compact Call”. A Compact Call would occur if the Upper Basin States are unable to deliver the water they are required to deliver under the rules of the 1922 Colorado River Compact to the Lower Basin States. Overuse of water, aridification of the West due to climate change, and growing populations throughout the basin are putting extreme pressure on the Colorado River.

Join us for Part 1 of our two part series to learn more about what curtailment or a “Compact Call” on the Colorado River means for people and the environment, how it could happen, and why the DCP is so important. Listen to Jim Lochhead, CEO of Denver Water and Andy Mueller, General Manager of the Colorado River Conservation District discuss what it means for Colorado.

Please note that throughout this episode all referenced reservoir water levels are specific to the time this episode was recorded during the summer of 2018. For updated reservoir levels, you can directly visit a reservoir’s website.

Photo Credit: Upper Colorado River, Joshua Duplechian - Trout Unlimited

Jan 03 2019

21mins

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Rank #4: Episode 15: Colorado River Compact Call Part 2 – Reducing the Risk of a Call

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Today, we release part 2 of our mini series on the impacts of a Colorado River Compact Call. Building on the content of Episode 14, in Episode 15 we hear again from Jim Lochhead, CEO of Denver Water and Andy Mueller, General Manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District.

Episode 15 describes their thoughts about what the Upper Basin States are doing to reduce the risk of a Compact Call. As Lochhead and Mueller describe, Upper Basin Water managers are taking a number of different voluntary approaches to reduce Compact risk, including demand management, a voluntary program that compensates water users on a temporary and voluntary basis to reduce water use and increase deliveries to Lake Powell.

This is exciting stuff! After listening to Episode 14, tune in to part two of the mini series, Episode 15 Colorado River Compact Call Part 2 – Reducing the Risks of a Call!

*Please note that throughout this episode all referenced reservoir water levels are specific to the time this episode was recorded during the summer of 2018. For updated reservoir levels, you can directly visit a reservoir’s website*

Jan 28 2019

22mins

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Rank #5: Episode 16: The Power of A Story

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For this episode of We Are Rivers, we take a break from understanding the policies that manage and protect our rivers to focus on why it is we care about protecting rivers in the first place. In Episode 16 we hear from two of our listeners: Eliza Stein and Jordana Barack as they share their river stories.

The stories of how Eliza Stein and Jordana Barrack became involved in river running, their favorite memories on water, and what they hope to accomplish with water conservation and inclusivity will be featured in this episode. Stories have the power to emotionally relate people to issues and causes, and this relation creates solidarity, this solidarity fosters cooperation, and this cooperation leads to conservation.

Join us by listening to Episode 16 of We Are Rivers, The Power of a Story. After you’re done, take a moment and share your story with us as part of our 5,000 Miles of Wild story collection.

Photo Credit: Sinjin Eberle, Green River in Desolation Canyon, Utah

Apr 01 2019

21mins

Play

Rank #6: Episode 19: Downriver - The Story of The Green and How Rivers Connect Us All

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The story of the Green is, in a word, complicated. There are many different uses and user groups who depend on the Green River. Telling the complicated tale of the Green River – including its past, present and future is a daunting task. Despite these challenges, Heather Hansman, environmental reporter and former raft guide, felt a unique pull to tell the story of the river from the seat of her packraft - its threats, opportunities and the intersection with its many users. In the summer of 2017, Heather paddled the entirety of the Green River, headwaters to confluence, providing a front row seat to how the Green moves, meanders, and provides.

Earlier this spring Heather’s new book, Downriver, made its way to bookshelves and kindles across the country. Downriver tells the story of the Green River, the challenges and opportunities facing the river and the many communities and user groups that depend on its water from its source to the confluence with the Colorado River. Join me us on this episode as we talk with Heather and learn more about the importance of the Green River and why she chose to explore and write about the Colorado’s most significant tributary.

May 22 2019

23mins

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Rank #7: Episode 8: Why Wild? The Importance of Wild and Scenic Protections

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Amidst the largest dam building era in the United States, Congress realized urgency around preserving certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations. In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson signed The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act into law, giving rivers a special designation to protect the remarkable values that free-flowing rivers have across the country. The Act is notable for safeguarding the special character of these rivers, while recognizing the potential for their appropriate use and development. It encourages river management crossing political boundaries and promoting public participation to develop goals for river protection.

In this episode of We Are Rivers, we dive into the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, and how it protects rivers, ensures community engagement, and preserves free flowing rivers for present and future generations. Tune in to learn more.

Jan 09 2018

12mins

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Rank #8: Episode 18: Climate Change, Rivers and Environmental Justice

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Climate change hits rivers and water first and hardest, impacting all communities but particularly historically marginalized communities who, as a result of generations of discrimination, are often located in floodplains, drained wetlands, or adjacent to sewage outfalls. The impacts of climate change exacerbate the other injustices that these communities face and will only grow worse over time. It’s important that when we talk about climate change, it isn’t just about charts and numbers but also environmental justice.

American Rivers believes everyone should have clean water and a healthy river. A significant portion of our nation’s drinking water comes from rivers, and we must do more to protect them from the impacts of climate change. Across the country, communities are experiencing shifts and variability in weather and climate such as increased droughts, more severe floods and serious water quality issues from rising water temperatures and algal blooms. While all communities feel the impacts of climate change, historically marginalized communities often experience the brunt of the challenges.

Tackling the issues of climate justice and climate change is a complicated and daunting task. But there are solutions to help communities adapt to a changing climate. At the national, state and local levels communities and stakeholders are coming together to identify innovative and collaborative solutions. In the face of many challenges, there is much to be hopeful for and inspired by.

Join us today on Episode 18 of We Are Rivers as we hear from Dr. Robert Bullard and Chris Williams who discuss climate change and climate justice, and what it means for people, rivers and the environment.

Photo Credit: Liz Bell, ednc.org

Apr 22 2019

20mins

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Rank #9: Episode 6: The Big Picture of Colorado’s Water Plan

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In 2015, Colorado took a big first step towards protecting our rivers, heritage, and way of life with the completion of Colorado’s Water Plan. While there is still much to do, the plan creates a framework to help us understand the actions needed to achieve a balance between the water we have and the water we need. Colorado’s Water Plan set a new path towards a secure water future to protect our state’s rivers, secure clean, safe reliable drinking water for our communities, and preserve our agricultural heritage. Now, our water future depends on funding elements of the plan. Episode 6 of We are Rivers dives into the big picture of Colorado's Water Plan. Photo Credit: Russ Schnitzer

Nov 20 2017

20mins

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Rank #10: Episode 11: How Water Management and Flexibility Can Save the Colorado River

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In this episode of We Are Rivers, we explore the ideas and efforts behind expanded demand management and increased conservation across the Upper Basin with Scott Yates of Trout Unlimited and Taylor Hawes of The Nature Conservancy, both of whom are deeply integrated into the nuance and detail of developing a system that works for everyone who relies on the Colorado River, as well as the long-term, sustainable health of the Colorado River itself.

Photo Credit: Russ Schnitzer

Jun 07 2018

22mins

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