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New Books in Architecture

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Arts
Visual Arts
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Interviews with Scholars of Architecture about their New Books

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Interviews with Scholars of Architecture about their New Books

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Great books

By Local263947 - Mar 21 2019
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I really enjoy listening to the interviews. I have found many new books to buy. Its much more interesting to hear the author talk about the book then reading a review.

iTunes Ratings

6 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
0
1
0
0

Great books

By Local263947 - Mar 21 2019
Read more
I really enjoy listening to the interviews. I have found many new books to buy. Its much more interesting to hear the author talk about the book then reading a review.

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Cover image of New Books in Architecture

New Books in Architecture

Updated 8 days ago

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Interviews with Scholars of Architecture about their New Books

Rank #1: David Smiley, “Pedestrian Modern: Shopping and American Architecture, 1925-1956” (University of Minnesota Press, 2013)

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Most of us have been to strip malls–lines of shops fronted by acres of parking–and most of us have been to closed malls–massive buildings full of shops and surrounded by acres of parking. Fewer of us have been to open malls: small parks ringed by shops with parking carefully tucked out of sight. That’s because open malls–once numerous–have largely disappeared, having been replaced by strip malls, closed malls and, more recently, big-box stores.


As David Smiley points out in his wonderfully researched and beautifully illustrated book Pedestrian Modern: Shopping and American Architecture, 1925-1956 (University of Minnesota Press, 2013), the open mall was a response to a number of macro-historical, mid-twentieth century forces: the explosion of car culture, the decline of urban centers, the rise of suburbs, and, of course, mass consumerism. But he also shows that the open mall wasn’t just an banal machine for selling; it was a canvas upon which Modernist architects could create a uniquely American kind of Modernist architecture. The strip mall, the closed mall, and the big-box store may be artless, but the mid-century open mall certainly was not. It had style, as the many wonderful images in David’s book show.


Interestingly, the open mall is making a comeback. I visited one outside Hartford, Connecticut. Alas, it has none of the Modernist elements that made the original open malls so interesting. To me, it looked like a closed mall turned inside out.

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Mar 13 2014

1hr 6mins

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Rank #2: Mike Wallace, “Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898-1919” (Oxford UP, 2017)

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In 1898, a new metropolis emerged from the consolidation of New York City with East Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the western part of Queens County. In Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919 (Oxford University Press, 2017), Mike Wallace describes the first two decades of this city’s expanded history, a period in which it led and embodied the developments that were taking place nationally. As he explains, consolidation was a trend throughout America during this era. Big business was at the forefront of this, as Wall Street provided the financing necessary for numerous industries to form dominant corporate combinations through mergers and takeovers. The enormous wealth controlled by these titans was prominent throughout the city, both in the new skyscrapers rising to dominate the city’s skyline and in the cultural and educational institutions that flourished with infusions of their capital. Similar mergers took place in many sectors and aspects of city life, from entertainment to labor, with even the criminal underworld consolidating in a reflection of the times. Wallace’s book chronicles all of this, as well as the developments in the many communities of a richly diverse city that during these years experienced dramatic growth and changes wrought by a global war.

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Nov 22 2017

50mins

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Rank #3: Bradley Cantrell and Adam Mekies, "Codify: Parametric and Computational Design in Landscape Architecture" (Routledge, 2018)

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Bradley Cantrell and Adam Mekies' new book Codify: Parametric and Computational Design in Landscape Architecture(Routledge, 2018) Bradley Cantrell and Adam Mekies, "Codify: Parametric and Computational Design in Landscape Architecture" (Routledge, 2018) Landscape architecture has a long history of innovation in the areas of computation and media, particularly in how the discipline represents, analyses, and constructs complex systems. This curated volume spans academic and professional projects to form a snapshot of digital practices that aim to show how computation is a tool that goes beyond methods of representation and media. The book is organized into four sections; syntax, perception, employ, and prospective. The essays are written by leading academics and professionals and the sections examine the role of computational tools in landscape architecture through case studies, historical accounts, theoretical arguments, and nascent propositions.

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Jun 04 2019

51mins

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Rank #4: Kenneth Olwig, "The Meanings of Landscape: Essays on Place, Space, Nature and Justice" (Routledge, 2019)

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In The Meanings of Landscape: Essays on Place, Space, Nature and Justice (Routledge, 2019), Kenneth Olwig presents explorations in landscape geography and architecture from an environmental humanities perspective. With influence from art, literature, theatre staging, architecture, and garden design, landscape has now come to be viewed as a form of spatial scenery, but this reading captures only a narrow representation of landscape meaning today. This book positions landscape as a concept shaped through the centuries, evolving from place to place to provide nuanced interpretations of landscape meaning. The essays are woven together to gather an international approach to understanding the past and present importance of landscape as place and polity, as designed space, as nature, and as an influential factor in the shaping of ideas in a just social and physical environment.

Olwig is an American-born landscape geographer, specializing in the study of the Scandinavian landscape. He is best known for advocating a "substantive" understanding landscape, one that incorporates legal and other lived significances of landscape, rather than viewing it in a more purely aesthetic way. His writings include Landscape, Nature and the Body Politic (2002) and Nature's Ideological Landscape (1984). Olwig is Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture Planning and Management at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Alnarp, Sweden.

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Sep 13 2019

1hr 4mins

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Rank #5: Patricia McCarthy, “Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland” (Paul Mellon Centre, 2016)

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In the early 18th century, country houses in Ireland underwent a dramatic physical transformation. In her book Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland (Paul Mellon Centre, 2016), Patricia McCarthy describes the course of this evolution, as the Palladian style turned aristocratic domiciles in rural Ireland from fortified buildings into elegant structures with columns, porticos, and other classically-influenced touches. From there she goes on to describe the interiors of the homes, the functions of the various rooms, and the lives lived both by the upper class and the people who served them. By describing the manifold ways in which the occupants used the spaces, a portrait of their domestic lives emerges that enriches our understanding not just of country house life in the 18th century but the world of the Protestant elite in Georgian Ireland as well.

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Jul 16 2016

1hr 6mins

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Rank #6: Raymond Jungles, “The Cultivated Wild: Gardens and Landscapes by Raymond Jungles” (The Monacelli Press, 2015)

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Raymond Jungles is the founder of the Miami based Landscape Architecture firm Raymond Jungles Inc. He graduate from the University of Florida with honors in 1981. And, was elected as a Fellow in 2006 in the American Society of Landscape Architects. Raymond’s work has earned 2 national awards and 40 state awards. He has lectured internationally at a diverse number of institutions and universities. In his book The Cultivated Wild: Gardens and Landscapes (The Monacelli Press, 2015), Jungles discusses his design process and its synthesis with local ecologies for our human desires of cultivated landscapes. The story of Jungles’s mentors weaves in and out of his projects. The art and ecology begins in the photography and hand drawings.

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Jun 27 2019

1hr 4mins

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Rank #7: Alexia Yates, “Selling Paris: Property and Commercial Culture in the Fin-de-siecle Capital” (Harvard UP, 2015)

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What comes to mind when you think of Paris in the nineteenth century? For me, its revolutionary politics, the circulation of increasing numbers of people and goods, a range of spectacular cultural displays and amusements, an emergent urban modernity including a host of negotiations between social classes, public and private, men and women, citizens and the state. And if I had to name one historical figure to stand for the transformation of the nineteenth-century capital? Haussmann. Hands down.

Alexia Yates‘s book, Selling Paris: Property and Commercial Culture in the Fin-de-siecle Capital (Harvard UP, 2015), opened my eyes to a whole other world of everyday urbanism and historical actors in the city during the first decades of the Third Republic. Acknowledging the undeniable impact of Haussmann and Haussmannization on the city that Paris became under and after the Second Empire, Selling Paris considers the activities, interests, and effects of a host of other figures who shaped the city’s property relations and commercial culture from the early years of the Third Republic to the First World War. In the books chapters, readers will find a social history of the business of French building during this period, from planning and production to use. Focused on the architects, private developers, municipal authorities, speculators, real estate agents, notaries, property owners, and tenants whose interactions and negotiations influenced the form, representation, and experience of Parisian real estate in purposeful ways, the book makes significant contributions to our understanding of the history of the capital and capitalism in France.


Roxanne Panchasi is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Simon Fraser University. A historian of French culture and politics in the twentieth century, her current research focuses on the representation of nuclear weapons and testing in France and its empire since 1945. She lives and reads in Vancouver, Canada. If you have a recent title to suggest for the podcast, please send an email to: panchasi@sfu.ca.


*The music that opens and closes the podcast is an instrumental version of Creatures, a song written by Vancouver artist/musician Casey Wei (performing as hazy). To hear more, please visit https://agonyklub.com/.

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Jul 12 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #8: Jeffrey Balmer and Michael Swisher, “Diagramming the Big Idea: Methods for Architectural Composition” (Routledge, 2012)

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In their new book Diagramming the Big Idea (Routledge, 2012), Jeffrey Balmer and Michael Swisher offer some new insights into the eternal problem of how creativity works. As you will hear in our interview, they are beginning design instructors and colleagues at University of North Carolina in Charlotte where they teach architecture students how to communicate their ideas and concepts through diagramming. The material for this book developed out of their teaching and a realization that students and professionals needed more resources to nurture their design thinking skills and methods. Of interest to both architects and anyone who wants to know more about the design process, this book explains how and why diagrams work, provides examples of successful diagramming strategies, and offers step-by-step instructions on how to make your own diagrams in two and three dimensions. The interview offers many insights into this fascinating and understudied topic.

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May 09 2013

1hr 8mins

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Rank #9: John Harwood, “The Interface: IBM and the Transformation of Corporate Design, 1945-1976” (University of Minnesota Press, 2011)

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Philip Kretsedemas is the author of Migrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside (Routledge, 2014). Kretsedemas is associate professor of sociology at University of Massachusetts-Boston. This is the second time he has been featured on New Books in Political Science podcast. In Migrants and Race in the US, Kretsedemas explains how migrants can be viewed as racial others, not just because they are viewed as nonwhite, but because they are racially “alien.” This way of seeing makes it possible to distinguish migrants from a set of racial categories that are presumed to be indigenous to the nation. In the US, these indigenous racial categories are usually defined in terms of white and black.

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Jun 24 2012

1hr 8mins

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Rank #10: Sharon Rotbard, “White City, Black City: Architecture and War in Tel Aviv and Jaffa” (MIT Press, 2015)

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In White City, Black City: Architecture and War in Tel Aviv and Jaffa (MIT Press, 2015), Sharon Rotbard, Senior Lecturer in the Architecture Department at Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem, examines the dual histories of Tel Aviv and Jaffa. He offers a nuanced and compelling deconstruction of the myth of the White City and the erasure of what he deems the Black City. This book is a compelling contribution, bringing critical urban studies into conversation with critical histories of Zionism in innovative and provocative ways.


Max Kaiser is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. He can be reached at kaiser@student.unimelb.edu.au.

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Dec 26 2016

40mins

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Rank #11: Sun-Young Park, "Ideals of the Body: Architecture, Urbanism, and Hygiene in Postrevolutionary Paris" (U Pittsburgh Press, 2018)

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We know quite a bit about the physical signatures of urban “modernity” foisted upon Paris by Baron Haussmann in the late nineteenth century — the broad boulevards, networked infrastructures, connected apartment houses, and assorted monuments — but little scholarship has seized on its precursors in the half-century prior. In Ideals of the Body: Architecture, Urbanism, and Hygiene in Postrevolutionary Paris (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018), Sun-Young Park turns to another modernity, recovering a daunting array of Romantic and especially post-Napoleonic interventions — less spectacular but arguably more complex — on mobile Parisian bodies and the everyday spaces that host them. Park considers military gymnasia, schools, barracks, leisure gardens, and other spaces purpose-built to inculcate vigor in both individuated physical bodies and, their proponents hoped amid specters of national decline, in the French body politic. Each of these spaces, Park shows, a “threshold” between fully private and fully public realms, helped install — albeit imperfectly — its own “ideal” of the sanitized and gendered human subject. Ideals of the Body is a detailed, visually rich, theoretically motivated study in urban and architectural history, one that just might realign how we periodize and make sense of urban modernity writ large.

Peter Ekman is Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. He received the Ph.D. from Berkeley in 2016, and is at work on two book projects on the cultural and historical geography of urban America across the long twentieth century. He can be reached at psrekman@berkeley.edu.

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Feb 01 2019

52mins

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Rank #12: Toufoul Abou-Hodeib, “A Taste for Home: The Modern Middle Class in Ottoman Beirut” (Stanford UP, 2017)

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Toufoul Abou-Hodeib‘s A Taste for Home: The Modern Middle Class in Ottoman Beirut (Stanford University Press, 2017) is a welcome addition to the scholarship on the urban history of Beirut precisely because it exceeds the disciplinary boundaries of urban history: A Taste for Home tells the story of late Ottoman Beirut through the middle class and their sense of self. Abou-Hodeib uses domesticity as a category of analysis to look at how the middle class functioned and what it aspired to be in the midst of the late Ottoman period. However, the book also succeeds wildly because it treats a local context within the global setting, taking seriously the intersecting themes of global capitalism and consumer culture, themes of domesticity and taste. Over the course of the book, leisure and urban development are also shown to be key elements in the development of the middle class, defining the city for generations to come. A Taste for Home will be critical for conversations for many years to come on class, the economy, the city, and the home in the study of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire.


Nadirah Mansour is a graduate student at Princeton University’s Department of Near Eastern Studies working on the global intellectual history of the Arabic-language press. She tweets @NAMansour26 and produces another Middle-East and North Africa-related podcast: Reintroducing.

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May 15 2018

35mins

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Rank #13: Ahmed Ragab, “The Medieval Islamic Hospital: Medicine, Religion, Charity” (Cambridge UP, 2015)

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In his shining new book The Medieval Islamic Hospital: Medicine, Religion, and Charity (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Ahmed Ragab, Assistant Professor of Religion and Science at Harvard Divinity School, charts the institutional and intellectual history of hospitals or bimaristans in medieval Egypt and the Levant. A central argument of this book is that hospitals in Islamdom were more than just institutions where the sick were treated; hospitals also served as important sites of communal services and congregation, as urban architectural monuments, and as symbols and expressions of a rulers political authority. By exploring an astonishing variety and number of sources, Ragab provides an unparalleled window into the aspirations and operations that defined the medieval Islamic hospital. This splendid new book will be of great interest to students of medieval Islamic history, religion and science, medical history, and the study of Islam and religion more broadly.

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Sep 21 2016

36mins

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Rank #14: Chris Reed and Nina-Marie Lister, "Projective Ecologies" (HGSD, 2014)

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Chris Reed and Nina-Marie Lister's book  Projective Ecologies (Harvard Graduate School of Design 2014) is about how landscape architecture can move forward in the design field beyond garden landscapes to delve into the serious issues of climate change and land use master planing affecting our global landscapes today. Projective ecologies is a “how to get started” guide to understanding what we can control, what we can’t control, and to embrace all of the creative chaos to produce good and meaning peacemaking for humans and nature.

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Aug 09 2019

57mins

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Rank #15: Ross King, “Seoul: Memory, Reinvention and the Korean Wave” (University of Hawaii Press, 2018)

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Seoul, as any listener who has visited will recognize, can be a pretty overwhelming place. This is well recognized by Ross King, Professorial Fellow in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne, who notes that cities like this “are experienced as disaggregated places, always already fragmented, bits, moments, feelings, memories” (p. 131). But in his richly illustrated and luxuriously produced book Seoul: Memory, Reinvention and the Korean Wave (University of Hawaii Press, 2018), Professor King does an expert job of ‘reading’ (p. 15) this megalopolis with deftness and elegance, interpreting the multiplicity of faces which it presents to visitor and local alike.


Drawing not only on observations of architecture and urban form, his own areas of expertise, King also offers insights from historiography, literature, film, religion, television and popular culture as they relate to the city. Bringing these into dialogue, he builds up a sophisticated picture of the myriad influences and symbolisms at play in Seoul’s urban landscape, and shows how they are layered, juxtaposed and entangled. Reading Seoul, we thus come to apprehend the city in its Korean, its Asian, and its global contexts. Equally importantly, we also learn how to see it as a crucible of overlapping and contending histories, and of successive developmental modernist projects, most recently those tied the ‘Korean Wave’. Anyone interested in Asian modernization at large, urban planning, and more generally in how national and urban transformations fit into wider social and cultural contexts will find a great deal to engage with here.

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Jun 14 2018

53mins

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Rank #16: Adrienne Brown, "The Black Skyscraper: Architecture and the Perception of Race" (John Hopkins UP, 2017)

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Adrienne Brown joins the New Books Network this week to talk about her fascinating 2017 book, The Black Skyscraper: Architecture and the Perception of Race (John Hopkins University Press, 2017), which was a recent recipient of the Modern Studies Association's First Book prize.

Tracing the interconnected histories of the skyscraper and racial thought between the 1880s and the 1930s, Brown provides a sophisticated account of how vertical as well as horizontal expansion within the modern American city helped to shape perceptions and understandings of race and racial difference.

Drawing on a rich array of material, including art, literature, architectural design and urban planning records, The Black Skyscraper explores architecture's effects on the process of seeing and being seen as a racialized subject. In this bold and deeply interdisciplinary work, Brown demonstrates the centrality of race to modern architectural design and the impact of the skyscraper on perceptions of race in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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Feb 25 2019

1hr 17mins

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Rank #17: Jo Farb Hernandez, “Singular Spaces: From the Eccentric to the Extraordinary in Spanish Art Environments” (Raw Vision, 2013)

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Singular Spaces: From the Eccentric to the Extraordinary in Spanish Art Environments (Raw Vision, 2013) is an audacious tome. A comprehensive survey of 45 art environments on the Spanish mainland, it weighs just over eight and a half pounds and contains over 1300 color photographs (with over 4000 more plus site plans on the accompanying CD). Its author, Jo Farb Hernandez, is the Director of SPACES, a non-profit focused on art environments around the world. She first became interested in place-based creative constructions when she was an undergraduate in Wisconsin. In her introduction to Singular Spaces, she recounts how this particular book began: she and her husband were in the process of renovating an old farmhouse they’d purchased in Catalonia. They took a short road-trip to explore the area around their new home and chanced upon “the enormous roadside construction of Josep Pujiula I Vila, at that time one of the largest and most idiosyncratic art environments found worldwide” (16). Shortly thereafter Farb Hernandez began documenting Pujiula’s work while writing another book. In the process she came across more and more such endeavors that demanded her attention. Singular Spaces is devoted to those sites and like them, the book is the product of years of labor and dedication.


Singular Spaces features the work of 45 artists, all men. Alongside the photographs and descriptions of the art environments, Farb Hernandez also tells the stories of their creators’ lives, and details the history and development of each project. She also describes the challenges that many of the artists have faced, not least those posed by unhappy neighbors and unsympathetic municipal authorities. In fact, helping the men deal with local adversities has led to Farb Hernandez frequently taking on the role of advocate on behalf of her interlocutors.


A recent review in the Journal of American Folklore described Singular Spaces as “incredibly important for those who are interested in architecture, the politics of place and space, folk art and art in general, art and activism, the psychology of creativity, and relationships between tradition and the individual. Jo Farb Hernandez has written more than a survey of eccentric art spaces. She has opened a door to each artist and space so that they may be explored, analyzed, and, in some cases, loved by any who enjoy such contextual art forms.”

Rachel Hopkin is a UK born, US based folklorist and radio producer and is currently a PhD candidate at the Ohio State University.

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Mar 28 2018

1hr 4mins

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Rank #18: Marc Treib, "Doing Almost Nothing: The Landscapes of Georges Descombes" (ORO Edition, 2019)

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Today I talked to Marc Treib about his new book Doing Almost Nothing: The Landscapes of Georges Descombes (ORO Editions, 2019).

Until now, writings about the architect/landscape architect Georges Descombes have been relatively limited, appearing primarily in publications in Switzerland and abroad as conversations, interviews, and conference proceedings; most of them have appeared only in French. However, during his forty years of practice, Descombes has developed and applied a method unique to landscape architecture, one in which an extremely broad vision, both scientifically and culturally, shapes his thinking and projects. Descombes enters each project by attempting to understand the existing conditions on site and how, using minimal means and interventions, those conditions can be modified to meet the requirements of the program and those appropriate to the natural or urban environment. To some critics it would appear that Descombes has always done too little on and to the site, and in some instances have condemned him for “doing almost nothing.” Although simplicity usually demands greater concentration and study, it often yields greater rewards that result from just that restraint. Perhaps how we approach the world is more important that how we shape the world. Descombes’s landscapes are instructive in this regard.

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Oct 30 2019

48mins

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Rank #19: Jordan Lacey, “Sonic Rupture: A Practice-led Approach to Urban Soundscape Design” (Bloomsbury, 2016)

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Sonic Rupture: A Practice-led Approach to Urban Soundscape Design (Bloomsbury 2016) by Jordan Lacey offers a practice-led alternative approach to urban soundscape design. Rather than understanding the functional noises of the city as solely problematic or unaesthetic annoyances to be eliminated, Lacey instead suggests ways in which they can be creatively harnessed to give new expression to urban life. Featuring expansive theoretical discussions and detailed analysis of Lacey’s own work as a sound artist, the book proposes the 5 element sonic rupture model as a way to diversify our experiences of city life.


New Books in Sound Studies is a collaboration between the Centre for Media Data and Society at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary and the New Books Network.

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Jun 15 2017

48mins

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Rank #20: Stephen Hamnett, "Planning Singapore: The Experimental City" (Routledge, 2019)

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In this episode, we talk with Stephen Hamnett about Planning Singapore: The Experimental City(Routledge, 2019), a book he edited with Belinda Yuen.

Two hundred years ago, Sir Stamford Raffles established the modern settlement of Singapore with the intent of seeing it become ‘a great commercial emporium and fulcrum’. But by the time independence was achieved in 1965, the city faced daunting problems of housing shortage, slums and high unemployment. Since then, Singapore has become one of the richest countries on earth, providing, in Sir Peter Hall’s words, ‘perhaps the most extraordinary case of economic development in the history of the world’. The story of Singapore’s remarkable achievements in the first half century after its independence is now widely known.

Stephen Hamnett is Emeritus Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of South Australia and a Commissioner of the Environment, Resources and Development Court of South Australia. Belinda Yuen is Professorial Research Fellow and Research Director at the Lee Kuan Yew Centre for Innovative cities, Singapore University of Technology and Design.

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Oct 07 2019

54mins

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