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fiction/non/fiction

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Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

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Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

iTunes Ratings

44 Ratings
Average Ratings
42
2
0
0
0

Summer Shows

By Czar1225 - Aug 05 2019
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I have really enjoyed the episodes this summer. Great topics and guests. Nice work.

Awesome and Interesting

By kate88books - May 07 2019
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Intelligent conversations about current events, and literature and the connections between them.

iTunes Ratings

44 Ratings
Average Ratings
42
2
0
0
0

Summer Shows

By Czar1225 - Aug 05 2019
Read more
I have really enjoyed the episodes this summer. Great topics and guests. Nice work.

Awesome and Interesting

By kate88books - May 07 2019
Read more
Intelligent conversations about current events, and literature and the connections between them.

Listen to:

Cover image of fiction/non/fiction

fiction/non/fiction

Updated 1 day ago

Read more

Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

Rank #1: 1: The Secret Lives of Editors: Rakesh Satyal, Brian Birnbaum, & M.K. Rainey on the World of Editing

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In this episode, novelist and editor Rakesh Satyal and Dead Rabbits Books founders Brian Birnbaum and M.K. Rainey talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about editing and being edited. Satyal discusses the ins and outs of big publishing houses, how he revises, and the simple but revealing question he heard another editor ask an author. Birnbaum and Rainey share what it took for them to start Dead Rabbits Books, how they give each other feedback, and why they appreciate fresh eyes on their work.

Guests:Rakesh SatyalBrian BirnbaumM.K. (Katie) Rainey

Readings for the Episode:Rakesh SatyalNo One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal Blue Boy by Rakesh Satyal Rakesh Satyal on the pick up line that changed his life LitHub, Nov. 7, 2018No One Can Pronounce My Name' Is A Charming Take On Loneliness And Connection by Maureen Corrigan, NPR, May 10, 2017 Brian BirnbaumEmerald City by Brian Birnbaum  Dead Rabbits Podcast Dead Rabbits Episode 33: Vulnerable Discovering an iconic literary character was based on your grandfather LitHub, May 16, 2019M.K. (Katie) RaineyReading Your Work in Public: 12 Tips from Dead Rabbits Reading Series Founder by M.K. Rainey, Writer’s Digest, July 15, 2019Citizen Uncensored: The Power of Student Centered Learning by M.K. Rainey, Writer’s Chronicle, July 2019

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Oct 03 2019

1hr 15mins

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Rank #2: 2: Idra Novey and Esmé Wang Talk Mental Health and Writing

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Idra Novey and Esmé Wang talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about Brett Kavanaugh, Christine Blasey Ford, trauma, and mental health.

Readings for the episode: · The Border of Paradise by Esmé Wang  ·  The Collected Schizophrenias by Esmé Wang (forthcoming) · Esmé Wang's website · “Perdition Days: On Experiencing Psychosis,” by Esme Wang · “The Silence of Sexual Assault in Literature,” by Idra Novey · Ways to Disappear and Those Who Knew, by Idra Novey · “Good Country People,” by Flannery O’Connor · The Recovering by Leslie Jamison

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Oct 18 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #3: 5: Madeline Miller on Circe, Homer, Translation, and Adaptation (recorded live at the Miami Book Fair)

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In this live episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, recorded at the 2018 Miami Book Fair, novelist Madeline Miller talks to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about ancient Greek epic, translation, mythological realism, and literary adaptation.

Readings for the Episode:

Circeand The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

The Odyssey and “Translator’s Note to The Odyssey by Emily Wilson

D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire

The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Creation of an American Myth  by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard

Guest: Madeline Miller

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Nov 29 2018

57mins

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Rank #4: 16: Democrats in the Bardo: George and Paula Saunders on Politics and Writing

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, taped live at the Unbound Book Festival in Columbia, Missouri, George and Paula Saunders talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing, politics, class, and the contenders for the Democratic nomination for the 2020 presidential election.

To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.

Guests:

●      George Saunders

●      Paula Saunders

Readings for the Episode:

●      10th of Decemberby George Saunders     

●      Lincoln in the Bardoby George Saunders     

●      Pastoralia by George Saunders

●      CivilWarLandin Bad Decline by George Saunders

●      The Distance Homeby Paula Saunders

●      War and Peaceby Leo Tolstoy 

●      “Robert Kennedy Saved from Drowning” by Donald Barthelme

●      The Unpopular Mr. Lincolnby Larry Tagg

●      American Pastoral by Philip Roth

●      "Grief" by Anton Chekhov

●      Beto O’Rourke on Medium

●      Books by Curtis Sittenfeld

●      The Source of Self-Regard by Toni Morrison 

●      Promise Me, Dad by Joe Biden     

●      “E Pluribus Unum?” by Stacey Abrams

●      Bob Hillman, "Carveresque," from the album Some of Us Are Free, Some of Us Are Lost

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May 02 2019

58mins

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Rank #5: 20: A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader Ginsburg was Vladimir Nabokov’s student—what effect has this had on her writing, and how are she and other liberal justices contending with their Trump-appointed colleagues?

Guests:

●     Irin Carmon

●     Jay Wexler

Readings for the Episode:

●     Irin Carmon’s archive at New York Magazine

●     “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas Are Officially at War Over Abortion,” The Cut, May 28, 2019, by Irin Carmon

●     “The big cases: Here are the U.S. Supreme Court’s most consequential cases in its current term, which runs from Oct. 2018 to June 2019.” By Han Huang, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung, Reuters Graphics

●     Tuttle in the Balance, by Jay Wexler

●     The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories, by Jay Wexler

●     Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburgby Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik

●     Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley

●     Our Non-Christian Nation: How Atheists, Satanists, Pagans, and Others Are Demanding Their Rightful Place in Public Lifeby Jay Wexler

●     Ari Richter, artist

●     “The Census Case Is Shaping Up to Be the Biggest Travesty Since Bush v. Gore, by Richard L. Hasen, Slate, June 25, 2019

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Jun 27 2019

1hr 10mins

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Rank #6: 21: The Military in a Time of Trump: Elliot Ackerman and Anuradha Bhagwati on the Armed Services Past and Future

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelist Elliot Ackerman and memoirist Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how the military has—and hasn’t—changed during Donald Trump’s time as Commander in Chief. They also discuss their own experiences as Marines, the history of the American military, and how its future may affect the country and the world.

To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.

Guests:Elliot AckermanAnuradha Bhagwati

Readings for the Episode:Waiting for Eden: a novel, by Elliot Ackerman Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning, by Elliot Ackerman Dark at the Crossing: A Novel, by Elliot Ackerman Green on Blue: A Novel, by Elliot Ackerman Unbecoming: A Memoir of Disobedience, by Anuradha Bhagwati What to Make of Military Endorsements,” by Elliot Ackerman, The New Yorker, Sept. 8, 2016 “A Former Marine Looks Back on Her Life in a Male-Dominated Military,” by V. V. Ganeshananthan, The New York Times, April 21, 2019 The Good Lieutenant, by Whitney Terrell“Donald Trump’s ‘Salute to America’ Was Not a Complete Authoritarian Nightmare,” by Joshua Keating, July 4, 2019, Slate.comFields of Fire by Jim WebbThe Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

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Jul 11 2019

1hr 10mins

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Rank #7: 7: How Has Literary Life Changed in 20 Years? With Curtis Sittenfeld and Oscar Villalon

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In search of some nostalgic holiday cheer, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell climb in the way back machine and time travel to 1997 with critic and editor Oscar Villalon and novelist Curtis Sittenfeld. Oscar rounds up the books that won prizes twenty years ago, the books that remain relevant, and explains why these books aren't always the same. Curtis talks to us about Monica Lewinsky, Esquire, The Prairie Wife, Sex and the City and the very literary politics of 1997\. PLUS an *exclusive* preview of her novel-in-progress about a Hillary Rodham who never becomes a Clinton. Readings (Fiction): Underworld by Don DeLillo; You Think It, I'll Say It, by Curtis Sittenfeld; The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy; American Pastoral by Phillip Roth; Paradise by Toni Morrison; Martin Dressler by Steven Millhauser; The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald; The Farewell Symphony by Edmund White; Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier; Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J.K. Rowling. Readings (Nonfiction): Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt; The Commissar Vanishes: the Falsification of Photographs and Art in Stalin's Russia by David King; The Rape of Nanking: the Forgotten Holocaust of World War II by Iris Chang; The Women by Hilton Als; Sex and the City by Candice Bushnell. In the Stacks will be back in two weeks. Happy Holidays!

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Dec 28 2017

1hr 8mins

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Rank #8: 15: So, Who's Funny in the Age of Trump?

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In episode 15, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell ask who’s funny in the age of Trump, and how they’re managing to pull it off. They talk to Sloane Crosley, author of the new essay collection, Look Alive Out There, about the humor of the everyday and the freedom and subversiveness of not writing about the president. The also speak to Alexandra Petri of The Washington Post’s ComPost column, whose column features humorous takes on political news ranging from James Comey’s book release to Chris Christie’s screaming eyes.

Readings:
• Look Alive Out There by Sloane Crosley
• A Field Guide to Awkward Silences and the ComPost blog, by Alexandra Petri, including [“Further excerpts from James Comey’s book, if the existing ones are anything to go on](https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost/wp/2018/04/13/further-excerpts-from-james-comeys-book-if-the-existing-ones-are-anything-to-go-on/?utm_term=.0d4b0ee949c3)"
• Life of Samuel Johnson, by James Boswell
• My Life and Hard Times, by James Thurber
• Sylvia Plath, [“Tulips”](https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49013/tulips-56d22ab68fdd0)
• The Penguin Dictionary of Modern Humorous Quotations
• [“The Clouds](http://classics.mit.edu/Aristophanes/clouds.html)," by Aristophanes
• [“The Personal Essay Boom is Over,”](https://www.newyorker.com/culture/jia-tolentino/the-personal-essay-boom-is-over) by Jia Tolentino

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Apr 19 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #9: 22: Alice Bolin and Kristen Martin on the Problem With Dead Girl Stories

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, writers Alice Bolin and Kristen Martin talk with Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan about the appeal and popularity of stories that revolve around dead girls and women. Bolin, author of Dead Girls: Essays on Surviving an American Obsession, discusses why we seek out stories that depict violence against women and how we can be more deliberate and reflective in our consumption of true crime. Kristen Martin, author of “Why We Love—and Need to Leave Behind—Dead Girl Stories,” joins in on the discussion about this ubiquitous and problematic trope.

Readings: • [Dead Girls: Essays on Surviving an American Obsession](https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062657145/dead-girls/) by Alice Bolin • [“Why We Love—and Need to Leave Behind—Dead Girl Stories”](https://lithub.com/why-we-love-and-need-to-leave-behind-dead-girl-stories/) by Kristen Martin • “[Picturing America](https://www.threepennyreview.com/samples/marcus_f06.html)” by Greil Marcus • [Gone Girl](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781524763671?aff=penguinrandom) by Gillian Flynn • [Helsinki press conference transcript](https://www.vox.com/2018/7/16/17576956/transcript-putin-trump-russia-helsinki-press-conference) on Vox  •[Over Tumbled Graves](https://www.harpercollins.com/9780061712838/over-tumbled-graves/) by Jess Walter  • [In Cold Blood](https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/in-cold-blood-truman-capote/1101755577) by Truman Capote • [Everything I Never Told You](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780143127550) by Celeste Ng • [What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780735211025?aff=penguinrandom) by Lesley Nneka Arimah • [The Lovely Bones](https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lovely-bones-alice-sebold/1100259243#/) and [Lucky](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781501171635) by Alice Sebold • [My Body Is a Book of Rules](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781597099691) by Elissa Washuta • [Dead Girls](http://www.dzancbooks.org/our-books/dead-girls-and-other-stories) by Emily Geminder • [A Time To Kill](http://www.jgrisham.com/books/a-time-to-kill/) by John Grisham • Stranger Things by The Duffer Brothers / Netflix • Twin Peaks by David Lynch / Netflix • [Give Me Your Hand](https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/megan-abbott/give-me-your-hand/9780316547185/) by Megan Abbott  • [The God of Small Things](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780006550686) by Arundhati Roy • [The Huntsman](https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780142001318) by Whitney Terrell

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Jul 26 2018

50mins

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Rank #10: 11: Annihilation, Adaptation: What's It Really Like to Have Your Book Made Into a Movie

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In episode 11, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell offer a very Lit Hub take on Academy Awards season. What’s the process really like when a book becomes a movie? How does Hollywood decide which books will work best for the big screen? For answers, they talk to production and development executive Christina Sibul, who worked on the Academy Award nominated book adaptations The House of Sand and Fog (2003) and Sideways (2004). Then author Jeff VanderMeer joins the show, fresh back from the L.A. premiere of Annihilation, a brand new Paramount Pictures film based on the first novel of Jeff’s bestselling Southern Reach Trilogy. Jeff will give us the inside scoop on his techniques for freaking out readers, how director Alex Garland translated Annihilation’s monsters to the big screen, and how to dress for the red carpet if you’re an author. BONUS: Sugi casts the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast movie adaptation! Readings: Southern Reach Trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer (2014); The House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III (1999); Sideways by Rex Pickett (2004)

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Feb 22 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #11: 9: Can I Get A Witness: God and Faith in American Fiction

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelists R.O. Kwon and Paul Harding and hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell discuss writing about God and faith.

Readings for the Episode:

·      The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

·      Tinkers and Enon by Paul Harding

·      Blind Spot and Open City by Teju Cole

·      The Complete Sermons of Ralph Waldo Emerson

·      He Held Radical Light by Christian Wiman

·      Marilynne Robinson

·      Laleh Khadivi

·      Simone Weil

·      Mohsin Hamid

·      Louisa May Alcott

Guests:

·      R.O. Kwon

·      Paul Harding

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Jan 24 2019

1hr 13mins

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Rank #12: 14: All Fiction is Crime Fiction

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In episode 14, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell examine the omnipresent American comfort narrative of mystery and crime fiction. Why do we love crime stories so much? How do they shape the way that we think about a whole host of real-world issues from the Mueller investigation to Black Lives Matter and the shootings of young black men by police? They are joined for this discussion by Mat Johnson, author of the novels Loving Day, Pym, Drop, and Hunting in Harlem, the nonfiction novella The Great Negro Plot, and the graphic novels Incognegro and Dark Rain. Readings: •    Incognegro by Mat Johnson, and its new miniprequels •    Superman II, Superman III (film) •    The Untouchables (film) •    The Road To Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America by Timothy Snyder •    The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler •    Indemnity Only by Sara Paretsky •    CrimeReads.com

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Apr 05 2018

58mins

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Rank #13: 8: Notice Me: How Literary Publicity Works

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, publicists and writers Carla Bruce-Eddings and Karen Gu and novelist Tom Barbash talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about how literary publicity works, and how books and authors get attention.

Readings for the Episode:

Part I: ·      Carla Bruce-Eddings on Twitter·      Algonquin Books on Twitter·      Karen Gu on Twitter·      Graywolf Press on Twitter·      Graywolf Press on Instagram·      Oculus by Sally Wen Mao ·      Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi ·      “Gender, Transition, and Ogbanje,” by Akwaeke Emezi, for The Cut·      Severance by Ling Ma ·      Pachinko by Min Jin Lee ·      “Amazing Grace,” by Carla Bruce-Eddings, in Well Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves, ed. Glory Edim ·      Carla Bruce-Eddings archive at New York Magazine·      “Seven White Rabbit Candies is Equivalent to One Cup of Milk,” by Karen Gu Part II ·      The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash ·      Lori & Julia’s Book Club Show on 107.1 in Minneapolis. ·      “In 'The Dakota Winters,' Finding A New Story To Tell About John Lennon,” National Public Radio Weekend Edition with Scott Simon·      The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon ·      “Oscar Villalon and Arthur Phillips on Getting That Big, Fat Writer’s Advance,” Fiction/Non/Fiction Episode 24, Season 1

Guests:

Tom Barbash

Carla Bruce-Eddings

Karen Gu

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Jan 10 2019

1hr 16mins

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Rank #14: 8: Literary Color Lines

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In episode 8, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell talk about sensitivity reads, cross-cultural writing, and the lack of diversity in the publishing industry with author and COO of We Need Diverse Books Dhonielle Clayton and agent Ayesha Pande. In the first half of the show, Clayton talks about her own career as a sensitivity reader—or, as she prefers, a targeted beta reader—and discusses her concerns with a recent _New York Times_ article on the subject. In the show's second segment, longtime agent and former editor Pande explains how she has seen a lack of diversity in publishing affect writers of color throughout her 25-year career. Readings: "In an Era of Online Outrage, Do Sensitivity Readers Result in Better Books, or Censorship?" by Alexandra Alter in _The New York Times_; "Twentieth Century Fiction and the Black Mask of Humanity" by Ralph Ellison, from _Shadow and Act_; "How Chris Jackson is Building a Black Literary Movement" by Vinson Cunningham in _The New York Times Magazine_. In the Stacks features Abby Fennewald, Director of Marketing and Publicity for BookPeople in Austin, Texas.

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Jan 11 2018

1hr 9mins

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Rank #15: 11: Academy Awards Season Episode

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelist and screenwriter Brit Bennett and television and screenwriter Emily Halpern discuss their projects and craft with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell. What is it like to adapt your own novel for screen—for Kerry Washington? What’s it like to attend a big awards show? How can screenwriting tips apply to fiction? Which movies deserved Best Picture nominations? The episode discusses these questions and more in the run-up to the Oscars. 

Readings for the Episode:

·    The Mothers, by Brit Bennett

·    Scandal on ABC

·    Movies in Oscar discussion:

o   Roma (dir. Alfonso Cuarón)

o   If Beale Street Could Talk (dir. Barry Jenkins)

o   The Favourite (dir. Yorgos Lanthimos)

o   A Star is Born (dir. Bradley Cooper)

o   Sorry To Bother You (dir. Boots Riley)

·    Trophy Wife

·    Carol’s Second Act (pilot in progress for CBS, by Emily Halpern and Sarah Haskins)

·    Book Smart, by Emily Halpern and Sarah Haskins (forthcoming in May 2019)

·    What Will Win Best Picture? 20 Oscar Voters Spill Their Secrets · .  Scriptnotes podcast

·    Russian Doll (Natasha Lyonne, Netflix) 

Guests:

·      Brit Bennett

·      Emily Halpern

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Feb 21 2019

1hr 10mins

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Rank #16: 14: Everything You've Ever Wanted to Know about Lit Mags (And Likely More)

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, editors Brigid Hughes of A Public Space and Jennifer Baker of Electric Literature and the Minorities in Publishing podcast discuss the world of literary journals with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell. What gets an editor’s attention? How much editing do they really do? And where was the AWP hotel bar in Portland? This episode, recorded during the annual AWP conference, has the answers.

Readings for the Episode:

·       A Public Space, Issue 27, ed. Brigid Hughes

·       Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage by Bette Howland (forthcoming, APS Books)

·       Everyday People: The Color of Lifeed. Jennifer Baker

·       Acentos Review

·       As/Us

·       Kweli Journal

·       Callaloo

·       Lambda Literary

·       Papercuts

·       Paper Darts

·       Tayo Literary Magazine

·       Tin House

·       Copper Nickel

·       The Golden State by Lydia Kiesling

·       The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

·       Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self by Danielle Evans

·       The Bible of Dirty Jokes by Eileen Pollack

Guests:

·       Brigid Hughes

·       Jennifer Baker

Live from the FSG Originals Party

 ·     Jessica Eckerstorfer

·      Danielle Evans

·      Lydia Kiesling

·      Dan Kois

·      R.O. Kwon

·      Wayne Miller

·      Eileen Pollack

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Apr 04 2019

1hr 21mins

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Rank #17: 17: Against Genre Snobbery: Marlon James and Daniel José Older on the Intersections of Literary and Genre Writing

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In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, taped live at the inaugural Wordplay in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Marlon James and Daniel José Older speak with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the politics of literary categories. They talk about Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the history of queerness in Africa, the importance of plot, the Wookieepedia, writing violence and respecting readers, and the details of dinosaurs.

Guests:

●      Marlon James

●      Daniel José Older

Readings for the Episode:

●      Black Leopard, Red Wolfby Marlon James

●      Dactyl Hill Squad & Dactyl Hill Squad: Freedom Fireby Daniel Jose Older

●      Hollywood Wivesby Jackie Collins

●      Buffy the Vampire Slayer

●      The Iliadby Homer

●      All the President’s Menby Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein

●      Madame Bovaryby Gustave Flaubert

●      Octavia Butler

●      The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ringby J.R.R. Tolkien

●      100 Years of Solitudeby Gabriel Garcia Marquez

●      The Stand & It by Stephen King

●      Shogunby James Clavell

●      Avatar: The Last Airbender

●      Star Wars: A New Hope

●      The Harry Potter Seriesby J.K. Rowling

●      Mrs. Caliban by Rachel Ingalls

●      Pokémon Detective Pikachu

●      Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson

●      Jesmyn Ward

●      Nicholson Baker

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May 16 2019

1hr 1min

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Rank #18: 24. On Whiteness Part I: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

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In the first half of a special two-part episode, novelist and critic Jess Row and poet and critic Tim Yu talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing about whiteness in America. How can white writers render their communities’ part in the country’s history of racism, and also challenge them? Row and Yu also share their responses to Bob Hicok’s recent Utne Reader essay about diversity in poetry.

To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.

Guests:Jess RowTim YuReadings for the Episode:Jess RowWhite FlightsYour Face in MineWhat Are White Writers For?” in The New Republic, Sept. 30, 2016“Native Sons: A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race” in Guernica, Aug. 13, 2013

Tim Yu "The Case of the 'Disappearing' Poet: Why did a white poet see the success of writers of color as a signal of his own demise?" The New Republic, August 7, 2019White Poets Want Chinese Culture Without Chinese People Calvin Trillin's "Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?" is the latest in a long artistic tradition. The New Republic, April 8, 2016, 100 Chinese Silences

Whitney TerrellThe King of Kings CountyThe Huntsman

Others:White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (book)"White Fragility," by Robin DiAngelo (article)"The Authentic Outsider: Bill Cheng, Anthony Marra, and the freedom to write what you don’t know," by V.V. GaneshananthanThe Dominance of the White Male Critic: Conversations about our monuments, museums, screens and stages have the same blind spots as our political discourse,” by Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang, The New York Times, July 5, 2019"The Promise of American Poetry," by Bob Hicok, Utne Reader, Summer 2019 (originally appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Winter 2018)"Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?" by Calvin Trillin, The New Yorker, March 28, 2016Orientalism by Edward SaidMapping Prejudice

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Aug 22 2019

1hr 11mins

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Rank #19: 25: Nathaniel Rich and Juliana Spahr: As the World Burns, Trump Tweets

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For episode 25 of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelist and journalist Nathaniel Rich and poet and activist Juliana Spahr discuss writing about climate change and ecological destruction with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell. In part one, Rich discusses the history and craft behind his groundbreaking New York Times Magazine article “Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change.” Next, Spahr talks about her recent Harper’s poem “A Destruction Story,” Trump’s use of poetry in his recent rallies, and the purpose of ecopoetics.

Readings for the episode: Losing Earth,” Odds Against Tomorrow, and King Zeno by Nathaniel Rich

A Destruction Story” and “Gentle Now, Don’t Add to Heartache” by Juliana Spahr

The Jasons: The Secret History of Science’s Postwar Elite by Ann Finkbeiner

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

John Adams by David McCullough Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boohttps://www.indiebound.org/book/9780812979329 Encounters with the Archdruid by John McPheehttps://www.indiebound.org/book/9780374514310 Nathaniel Rich’s Energy Gang podcast interview

Turtle Island by Gary Snyder

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Sep 06 2018

1hr 12mins

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Rank #20: 9: A Whole New Kind of Obscenity?

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For episode 9, V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell talk with Ron Charles, editor of The Washington Post Book World and Shanthi Sekaran, author of Lucky Boy, about obscenity, literature, and immigration. In the first half of the show, Charles leads us through the famous 1933 obscenity trial involving James Joyce's Ulysses and the 1964 trial involving Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer. Then Shanthi Sekaran talks to us about Trump's infamous shithole comments, his immigration policy, and how she believes the language surrounding immigration—"ICE," "illegal alien"—is more profane than any curse word. Plus: Whitney reads the dirtiest passage he can find in Ulysses and embarrasses his mother. Readings: Ulysses by James Joyce; Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller; The Awakening by Kate Chopin; Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran. In the Stacks features Anthony Stromoski of Rough Draft Bar and Books in Kingston, NY.

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Jan 25 2018

1hr 9mins

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