Cover image of A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers
(88)

Rank #100 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #100 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
Read more

Fortnightly in-depth interviews featuring a diverse range of talented, innovative, world-class photographers from established, award-winning and internationally exhibited stars to young and emerging talents discussing their lives, work and process with fellow photographer, Ben Smith. Music: © John Moody.

Read more

Fortnightly in-depth interviews featuring a diverse range of talented, innovative, world-class photographers from established, award-winning and internationally exhibited stars to young and emerging talents discussing their lives, work and process with fellow photographer, Ben Smith. Music: © John Moody.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
85
1
0
1
1

Awesome insights into the creative mind

By Marzism - Aug 28 2018
Read more
This podcast is invaluable, thank you!

Photographer

By Christina_thomson - Aug 12 2018
Read more
Ben, is doing an amazing and I think seriously important history of great photographers.

iTunes Ratings

88 Ratings
Average Ratings
85
1
0
1
1

Awesome insights into the creative mind

By Marzism - Aug 28 2018
Read more
This podcast is invaluable, thank you!

Photographer

By Christina_thomson - Aug 12 2018
Read more
Ben, is doing an amazing and I think seriously important history of great photographers.

Listen to:

Cover image of A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

Fortnightly in-depth interviews featuring a diverse range of talented, innovative, world-class photographers from established, award-winning and internationally exhibited stars to young and emerging talents discussing their lives, work and process with fellow photographer, Ben Smith. Music: © John Moody.

Rank #1: 057 - Carolyn Drake

Podcast cover
Read more

Magnum Photos member Carolyn Drake studied Media/Culture and History at Brown University, where she became interested in the ways that history and reality are purposefully shaped and revised over time, and in the ways that artists can interrupt and shift these narratives. After graduating, she worked for multimedia companies in New York but eventually left her office job at the age of 30 to engage with the physical world through photography. In 2006, she moved to Ukraine, where she spent a year examining cultural partitions in a country pursuing a unified national identity - a cloistered Soviet era orphanage near the European border; private, state-owned and illegal coal mining groups vying for influence in the Donbass; Crimean muslims claiming land rights. She made images everywhere, not as much for historical documentation as to come to terms with presumptions stemming from her Cold War childhood in the USA. The experience made her question the journalistic impulse to define, and to look for ways photography can emphasize ambiguity. Based in Istanbul between 2007 and 2013, Carolyn traveled frequently to Central Asia to work on two long term photography projects. The first, Two Rivers, is a poetic exploration of the shifting borders, histories, and life systems between the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. The interconnectedness of ecology, culture and political power come to view in a territory on the edge of global attention. The second Central Asia project is an amalgam of photographs, drawings, and embroideries made in collaboration with Uyghurs in western China. Framed between passages from Nurmuhemmet Yasin's contraband story Wild Pigeon, the book puts forth a counter narrative about China's western frontier, Islam, and the freedoms associated with modernity. In the collaborative images, contrasting visual tools intersect, drawing attention to the awkward, difficult, sometimes beautiful cultural exchange that lies at the root of this series. Carolyn returned to the US in 2014 and is now based in Vallejo, California. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, the Lange Taylor Prize, a Fulbright fellowship, and the Anamorphosis prize, among other awards. Her work is in the collections at the SFMOMA, Soros Foundation, Library of Congress, and Ogden Museum of Southern Art. She is an associate at Magnum Photos.

Jul 12 2017

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #2: 070 - Christopher Anderson

Podcast cover
Read more
Christopher Anderson was born in Canada in 1970 and grew up in west Texas, USA. In 2000, on assignment for the New York Times Magazine, he boarded a small wooden boat with 44 Haitians trying to sail to America. The boat sank in the Caribbean. The photographs earned Christopher the Robert Capa Gold Medal and marked the beginning of a 10 period as a contract photographer for Newsweek Magazine and National Geographic Magazine. In 2011 he became New York Magazine’s first ever Photographer in Residence. Christopher joined Magnum Photos in 2005, he is the author of four monographs and is currently based in Barcelona, Spain. THIS EPISODE OF THE PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY THE CHARCOAL BOOK CLUB - THE LATEST AND GREATEST PHOTOBOOKS, EXPERTLY CURATED AND DELIVERED TO YOU DOOR WITH FREE SHIPPING AND NO HASSLES. \*\*VERY SPECIAL LISTENER OFFER\*\* USE CODE 'ASMALLVOICE' TO CLAIM A FREE PHOTOBOOK WHEN YOU JOIN!!! https://charcoalbookclub.com - INFORM THE MIND, INSPIRE THE SOUL

Jan 10 2018

1hr 16mins

Play

Rank #3: 091 - Martin Parr

Podcast cover
Read more

The man who the Daily Telegraph declared to be, “arguably Britain’s greatest living photographer” had a suburban childhood in the provincial county of Surrey, England, where his budding interest in the medium of photography was encouraged by his grandfather George Parr, himself a keen amateur photographer.

Martin went on to study photography at Manchester Polytechnic in the early 70s and since that time has worked on many, many photographic projects, publishing over 100 books of his own work and editing another 30. He has developed an international reputation for his innovative imagery, his oblique approach to social documentary, and his input to photographic culture within the UK and abroad.

In 1994 Martin became a full member of Magnum Photos, scraping in by a single vote, in the face of strong opposition to his inclusion from some of the old guard, including Philip Jones Griffiths and Henri Cartier Bresson himself. He has since become an important and influential Magnum Member where he served as President between 2013 and 2017.

Martin has also developed an interest in filmmaking, and has started to use his photography within different genres, such as fashion and advertising. In 2002 the Barbican Art Gallery and the National Media Museum initiated a large retrospective of Martin’s work and this exhibition toured Europe for the next 5 years.

Martin was Professor of Photography at The University of Wales Newport campus from 2004 to 2012 and Guest Artistic Director for the Arles photo festival in 2004. In 2006 he was awarded the Erich Salomon Prize and the resulting Assorted Cocktail show opened at Photokina and in 2008 was guest curator at New York Photo Festival.

Parrworld opened at Haus de Kunst, Munich, in 2008. The show exhibited Martin’s own collection of objects, postcards, photography prints by both British and International photographers, photo books and a new project from Parr entitled Luxury. The exhibition toured Europe for the following 2 years.

At PhotoEspana in 2008, Martin won the Baume et Mercier Award in recognition of his professional career and contributions to contemporary photography. He is co-author with Gerry Badger of the exhuastive three volume series The Photobook: A History. In March 2016 Strange and Familiar, curated by Parr, opened at the Barbican, London. The show examines how international photographers from 1930s onwards have photographed in the UK.

Martin was awarded the Sony World Photography Award for Outstanding Contribution to Photography in April 2017. In Autumn 2017 the Martin Parr Foundation - which is a gallery and archive dedicated to supporting and preserving the photographic legacy of not only Martin himself but also of photographers who made, and continue to make, important work focused on the British Isles - opened in Bristol.

Martin is currently working on an exhibition for the National Portrait Gallery which opens in March 2019.

In episode 091, Martin discusses, among other things:

  • The Foundation
  • The UK’s attitude towards photography
  • How his suburban childhood influenced his photography
  • Tony Ray Jones
  • Developing his distinctive colour style
  • The Last Resort
  • Being described as ‘an alien’ by Heni Cartier Bresson
  • Passing on 12,000 photobooks to Tate Modern
  • The health and future of Magnum Photos

Referenced:

Martin: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

MPF: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“I’m pretty happy with the way it’s turned out, to be honest. I have to kick myself sometimes to realise I’m still earning a living from my hobby.”

Oct 31 2018

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #4: 112 - Mark Steinmetz

Podcast cover
Read more

Mark Steinmetz is an American photographer who makes black and white photographs "of ordinary people in the ordinary landscapes they inhabit” and "in the midst of activity”. His work is held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the New York Museum of Contemporary Photography, to name but a few. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship and his work has been exhibited in too many major museums and art galleries to list. He has produced 15 photobooks, such as South Central (2007), The Players (2015), Fifteen Miles to K-Ville (2015) and the Angel City West trilogy.

Mark was born in New York City and raised in the Boston-area suburbs until he was 12 at which point he moved to the midwest. At age 21 he moved to New England to study photography at Yale School of Art in New Haven, Connecticut. He left that MFA program after one semester and in mid 1983, aged 22, moved to Los Angeles in search of the photographer Garry Winogrand, whom he befriended. In 1999 he moved to Athens, Georgia where he still lives, with his wife, photographer Irina Rozovsky, and their young daughter.

On episode 112, Mark discusses, among other things:

  • Delving into the archive
  • Angel City West
  • First darkroom in Iowa
  • Going to L.A. and meeting Winogrand
  • Earning a living
  • MOMA show
  • Bring drawn to The South and shooting there
  • Why he works in B&W
  • His aesthetic and why he still prints his own work
  • Meditation and avoiding distractions

Referenced:

Website

“There’s this beautiful thing and it’s the main thing and it’s the important thing and sometimes perfectionism can just cripple that. You know, why is one picture alive and another dead? And often it’s just, who wants something perfect, you know? It doesn’t ring true really. So I do like some sloppiness but I try to be smart about it.”

Aug 21 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #5: 017 - Matt Stuart

Podcast cover
Read more

Matt Stuart shoots people. As one of the UK’s most prolific and highly respected street photographers, he has spent nearly two decades obsessively pounding the streets of London, where he lives, in pursuit of those elusive, magical moments when all the different elements of a good street photo - colour, composition, humour, happenstance - merge together for that split second, where Matt is poised and ready to capture the moment- and sometimes anticipate it - with his trusty Leica. His first book - All That Life Can Afford - containing many of the highlights from these trips, is published in February 2016 under his own imprint, Plague Press. And you can order a copy direct from his website via the link below. If you want to jump on the end of year best-of bandwagon (and why wouldn't you?) please do nominate your favourite photobook of 2015, in the comment section of the website. Happy holidays!

Dec 23 2015

1hr

Play

Rank #6: 084 - Bruce Gilden

Podcast cover
Read more

An Iconic street photographer with a unique style, Magnum Photos member Bruce Gilden was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1946. He went to Penn State University but he found his sociology courses too boring for his temperament and he quit college. Bruce briefly toyed with the idea of being an actor but in 1967, he decided to buy a camera and to become a photographer. Although he did attend some evening classes at the School of Visual Arts in New York, Bruce mostly taught himself.

HIs abiding fascination for life on the streets began in childhood and was the spark that inspired his first long-term personal projects, photographing in Coney Island and then during the Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Over the years he has produced long and detailed photographic projects in New York, Haiti, France, Ireland, India, Russia, Japan, England and, of course, America. Since the seventies his work has been exhibited in museum and art galleries all over the world and is part of many collections.

Bruce's trademark photographic style is defined by the dynamic accent of his pictures, its graphic qualities, and his original and in your face manner of shooting passers-by with a flash and often close in.

Bruce has received many awards and grants for his work, including a 2013 Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and has published 18 monographs of his work. He joined Magnum Photos in 1998 and having lived most of his life in Manhatten, now lives in Beacon, New York with his wife and three cats.

In episode 084, Bruce discusses, among other things:

Being yourself

Recently discovered negatives

His difficult childhood

The drug habit that almost killed him

Advantages of working digitally

The criticisms directed at his Face series

What’s he’s learned

Why the kid from his Farm Boys and Farm Girls series (above) was crying uncontrollably

Influencial:

Lisette Model

Leon Levinstein

Ed van der Elsken

Shōmei Tōmatsu

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“I look in the mirror and I smile because of where I came from to where I am. And I do these pictures for me. It defines who I am. I’d love everybody to love them but if they don’t too bad, what can I say?”

THIS EPISODE OF THE PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY THE CHARCOAL BOOK CLUB- THE LATEST AND GREATEST PHOTOBOOKS, EXPERTLY CURATED AND DELIVERED TO YOU DOOR WITH FREE SHIPPING AND NO HASSLES.

**VERY SPECIAL LISTENER OFFER**

USE CODE 'ASMALLVOICE' TO CLAIM A FREE BOOK OF YOUR CHOICE WHEN YOU JOIN!!

INFORM THE MIND, INSPIRE THE SOUL

Jul 25 2018

1hr 12mins

Play

Rank #7: 015 - Harry Borden (pt.1)

Podcast cover
Read more

Over the course of a 30 year career as one of the UK’s most prominent and prolific portrait photographers, Harry Borden has photographed absolutely everybody. He started out shooting bands and musicians for the New Musical Express, where he quickly made a name for himself, before then establishing himself as a regular contributor to the Observer Newspaper and its magazine. It wasn’t long before he would cement his burgeoning reputation by winning second prize in the portrait category of the World Press Photo awards on two consecutive years, at a stage in his career where he barely knew what the World Press Photo awards were. Since then his work has featured in the weekend magazines of just about every national newspaper in Britain as well as many of the world’s most high profile magazines. Harry has more photographs in the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery than an other photographer of his generation and in 2014 he was awarded an honorary fellowship of the royal photographic society. As well as his editorial and commercial work he has also produced a number of personal projects, the latest of which is a portrait series of holocaust survivors which will be published in 2017 by Octopus. He talks a little about the project in part 2, which will be next week. It was a real pleasure to talk to Harry. He is an absolute gentleman and the reason this is a two-parter is that we chatted for well over two hours and I think we could’ve gone on all day. When I came to listen to the interview, I realised I couldn’t possibly edit it down to a listener-friendly hour or so, because I wanted to use nearly all of it. So, rather than put out one stupidly long episode, I thought I would run it over two weeks, and that’s what I’m doing. Here’s part one and at the beginning of the conversation we were talking about a shoot Harry had recently done with the dancer, Darcy Bussell…

Dec 09 2015

57mins

Play

Rank #8: 026 - Laura El Tantawy

Podcast cover
Read more

Laura El-Tantawy was born in Worcestershire, England to Egyptian parents and spent her childhood and early years in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the USA. Her photography, perhaps inevitably, is inspired by questions on her identity - exploring social and environmental issues pertaining to her background. In 2002, she started her career as a newspaper photographer in the USA with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and then the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. In 2006, she went freelance to pursue personal projects. She is a graduate of the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia with dual degrees in journalism and political science. She also has an MA in Art and Media Practice from the University of Westminster as well as a Research Fellowship at the University of Oxford. Last year, in 2015, Laura published her first photobook, In The Shadow Of The Pyramids, a first person account exploring memory and identity which began in 2005 when she returned to Egypt out of a desire to reconnect with a country she felt she no longer knew in order to explore the essence of Egyptian identity in the hope of coming to terms with her own. The book was critically acclaimed and led to Laura being nominated for the 2016 Deutsche Borse Photography Foundation Prize for which she is one of the four finalists. All 500 copies have sold out but you can still get yourself one the limited special editions, available from her website (link below) at £250. Not cheap, but an investment! In episode 26, Laura discusses: Formative experiences - Saudi & USA; discovering photography; a training in newspapers; having a day job; the origins of In The Shadow Of The Pyramids; a secret revealed: Cloudy mode!; visual literacy among the general population and the succes of the book

May 04 2016

59mins

Play

Rank #9: 096 - Lynsey Addario

Podcast cover
Read more

Lynsey Addario is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American photojournalist and New York Times bestselling author who regularly works for The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time Magazine. Lynsey began photographing professionally for the Buenos Aires Herald in Argentina in 1996 with no previous photographic training. In the late 1990s, she began freelancing in New York City for Associated Press, where she worked consistently for three years before moving to New Delhi, India, to cover South Asia for the Chrstian Science Monitor, The Boston Globe, and Houston Chronicle. In 2000, Lynsey first travelled to Afghanistan to document the life and oppression of women living under the Taliban, and made three separate trips to the country under Taliban rule before September 11, 2001.

Over the past 15 years, Lynsey has covered every major conflict and humanitarian crises, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, Libya, Syria, Lebanon, South Sudan, Somalia, and Congo. In 2015 she released a New York Times best-selling memoir, It's What I Do, which chronicles her personal and professional life as a photojournalist and which was quickly optioned by Warner Bros. studios and slated to be a Steven Speilberg production starring jennifer lawrence but has now morphed into a directed by Ridley Scott production starring Scarlett Johansson.

Lynsey has been the recipient of numerous international awards throughout her career, and in 2015, American Photo Magazine named Lynsey one of the five most influential photographers of the past 25 years, writing that “Addario changed the way we saw the world’s conflicts.” In 2009, she was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, for which she received a professional stipend from 2010 to 2015. She was part of the New York Times team to win the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for her photographs in ‘Talibanistan,’ published in the New York Times Magazine. In November 2015, she was awarded the Excellence in International Reporting Award from the International Center for Journalists in Washington, DC, a Gaudium award from The Breukelein Institute in New York, and the el Mundo Journalism award in Barcelona, Spain. In 2016, Lynsey was part of the New York Times team nominated for an Emmy Award for her collaboration in the The Displaced series for the New York Times Magazine, a reportage documenting the lives of three children displaced from war in Syria, Ukraine, and South Sudan. She was the recipient of the Overseas Press Club's Oliver Rebbot award for 'Best Photographic Reporting from Abroad in Magazines and Books,' for her series Veiled Rebellion, an intimate look at the lives of Afghan Women.

Her new photobook Of Love And War, which represents a career retrospective to-date, was recently published by Penguin Random House.

In episode 096, Lynsey discusses, among other things:

  • The situation in Yemen
  • News from Hollywood on the forthcoming movie of her memoir It's What I Do
  • Writing the memoir and why she didn’t worry about her writing skills
  • The new photobook Of Love And War and how she went about editing from a million photos
  • Her upbringing as the youngest of four girls in a ‘loud, crazy, eccentric’ Italian-American family
  • Her tendency for self-criticism
  • Madonna, Salgado, Bebeto Matthews and early career inflection points
  • India, Afghanistan, Pakistan and 9/11
  • Why she didn’t tell anyone she was pregnant and the way people react once you’re a mother.
  • The Libya story (or some of it, anyway)
  • The photo business’s #MeToo moment

Referenced:

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“When I’m photographing there is no place else I’d rather be. It is the one place I’m fully present with whoever is in front of my lens, and I’m in the moment. And I can’t really say that about many other places.”

Jan 09 2019

1hr 12mins

Play

Rank #10: 066 - Sian Davey

Podcast cover
Read more

Sian Davey is a photographer with a background in Fine Art and Social Policy who had a successful career as a psychotherapist for many years before deciding to jack it all in and pursue a new career in photography which so far, to all intents and purposes, appears to be going swimmingly.

Her work is an investigation of the psychological landscapes of herself, her family and her community, all of which are central to her practice. Her first series focussed on her young daughter Alice, who she started photographing at the age of one. The project was eventually published as a book by Trolley Books entitled Looking for Alice which was shortlisted for the Aperture Best Book Award at Paris Photo 2016.

Her most recent series Martha focussing on her teenage step-daughter and grew as a response to her question to Sian: 'why don't you photograph me anymore?' So Sian did - turning her lens on Martha and her friends to produce an intimate collaboration.

Sian has recently completed her MA and MFA in photography. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Arnold Newman Award for New Directions in Portraiture and the Prix Virginia Woman's Photography Award. Her work was included in the National Portrait Gallery's Taylor Wessing Portrait Award for the last three consecutive years. She is represented by the Michael Hoppen Gallery.

In episode 066, Sian discusses, among other things:

The confluence of circumstances that led to photography

Going nuts for 10 years

Looking for Alice

Being all or nothing

Martha

Together

Dealing with hitting 50

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Nov 15 2017

1hr 14mins

Play

Rank #11: 082 - Vanessa Winship: "And Time Folds" Special

Podcast cover
Read more

This episode of A Small Voice celebrates the work and career of British photographer Vanessa Winship on the opening of And Time Folds, her first major UK solo exhibition now showing - in conjunction with a big retrospective of the work of Dorothea Lange - at London's Barbican Centre. You can hear Vanessa's earlier interview on Episode 3 of this podcast. Vanessa and I walked round the exhibition recording this chat as we went.

Here, more or less, is how the Barbican introduces the show: Vanessa's poetic gaze explores the fragile nature of our landscape and society and how memory leaves its mark on our collective and individual histories. Vanessa's oeuvre captures the ‘transition between myth and the individual’, revealing deeply intimate photographs that often appear to avoid specific contexts or any immediate political significance. The exhibition brings together an outstanding selection of more than 150 photographs, many of which have never been seen before in the UK, as well as a collection of unseen archival material.

Vanessa's practice focusses on the junction 'between chronicle and fiction, exploring ideas around concepts of borders, land, memory, desire, identity and history’. Having lived and worked in the region of the Balkans, Turkey and the Caucasus for more than a decade, her epic series' Imagined States and Desires: A Balkan Journey (1999–2003) and Black Sea: Between Chronicle and Fiction (2002–2006) investigate notions of periphery and edge on the frontiers of Eastern Europe, displaying the human condition through a vulnerable, yet intentionally incomplete, narrative. Capturing fragmentary images of collective rituals, means of transport and leisure activities, she presents a frieze of the human landscape in these regions, expressing society’s relationship to the terrain while remaining remote from any precise geo-political or historical events….

In episode 082, Vanessa and I talk about, among other things:

Why the work also belongs to her creative and life partner George Georgiou (Ep. 2)

Ismail Kadare and the oral tradition

The inclusion of audio readings

The importance to her of the written word

What makes a 'good' portrait

Serendipity

Thinking about the sound in pictures

Her very different new work from which the title of the exhibition is taken

The book of the show, published by Mack

Writers mentioned or influential:

Ismail Kadare

Strabo

Neil Ascherson

Richard Powers

Truman Capote

“People ofter say to me “oh your work is timeless” and in a certain way that’s how people read it, but actually it’s more about the folding of time; the here and now, but the going backwards and forwards and the doubling and the extending of time, the cycles of life.”

THIS EPISODE OF THE PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY THE CHARCOAL BOOK CLUB - THE LATEST AND GREATEST PHOTOBOOKS, EXPERTLY CURATED AND DELIVERED TO YOU DOOR WITH FREE SHIPPING AND NO HASSLES.

**VERY SPECIAL LISTENER OFFER**

USE CODE 'ASMALLVOICE' TO CLAIM A FREE COPY OF 'AND TIME FOLDS' BY VANESSA WINSHIP WHEN YOU JOIN!!!

INFORM THE MIND, INSPIRE THE SOUL

Jun 27 2018

1hr 48mins

Play

Rank #12: 068 - Anastasia Taylor-Lind

Podcast cover
Read more

Anastasia Taylor-Lind is an English/Swedish photographer who for the past decade has worked for leading editorial publications all over the world on issues relating to women, population and war for a decade.

She is a Harvard Nieman Fellow 2016 and recently finished a year of research at the university on war, and how we tell stories about modern conflict. Anastasia is also currently a Logan Fellow at The Carey Institute for Global Good where she is working on a book about the visual representation of contemporary warfare and the photojournalists who cover it. She is also a TED fellow. Anastasia has written about her experiences as a photojournalist for The New York Times, TIME LightBox, Nieman Reports and National Geographic.

As a photographic storyteller, her focus has been on long-form narrative reportage for monthly magazines. She is a National Geographic Magazine contributor and her other clients include Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, TIME, The New York Times, The Sunday Times, The Telegraph and The Guardian. 

Her first book MAIDAN – Portraits from the Black Square, which documents the 2014 Ukrainian uprising in Kiev, was published by GOST books the same year.

 Anastasia’s  work has been exhibited internationally, in spaces such as The Saatchi Gallery, The Frontline Club, and The National Portrait Gallery in London, SIDE gallery in Newcastle, Fovea Exhibitions in New York, Pikto Gallery in Toronto and The New Mexico Museum of Modern Art in Santa Fe.

A wide variety of organizations have recognized and supported her projects through awards such as the POYi, Sony World Photography Awards, Royal Photographic Society Bursaries and the FNAC Grant at Visa Pour L’Image.

Anastasia has a BA degree in Documentary Photography from the University of Wales Newport and an MA from the London College of Communication. She is regularly engaged with education, teaching at leading universities in Europe and the USA, including at MIT, Harvard and Columbia University. 

In Episode 068, Anastasia discusses, among other things:

Photographing the Rohingya refugee crisis

Instagram and socail media

Her unconventional gypsy upbringing

Sexism within the photo world

Peshmerga project

Studying the way we tell stories about war and conflict

Russia and Ukraine and her very useful friend Camilla Naprous (with whom she is making a book)

Recycling a 'failed' idea to create her successful Maidan Square project

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

“I do make photographs for a whole host of different reasons but one of them is also because this is the life that I’ve chosen for myself, and its beyond a job or a career. and it’s how I want to live and experience the world...”

Dec 13 2017

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #13: 006 - Laura Pannack

Podcast cover
Read more

Laura Pannack has established herself in the past six or seven years as a very original voice in the field of portrait photography. She has been extensively exhibited and published in the UK and Internationally, with her work having been shown at the National Portrait Gallery and the Houses of Parliament, among other venues. She has won numerous awards, including a first prize in the World Press Awards and the 2012 Vic Odden Award.
To quote from the blurb on her own website: 'Laura is driven by research led self-initiated projects. In her own words, she does all she can “to understand the lives of those captured, and to present them creatively”. She is a firm believer that “time, trust and understanding is the key to portraying subjects truthfully”, and as such, many of her projects develop over several years. Her particular approach allows a genuine connection to exist between sitter and photographer, which in turn elucidates the intimacy of these very human exchanges. Her images aim to suggest the shared ideas and experiences that are entwined in each frame that she shoots.'
In episode 006, Laura discusses: Feeling unproductive; early memories of having a photographer dad; trust; asking inappropriate questions; human vulnerability; the dilemma of deciding when to quit and remaining dissatisfied.

Oct 06 2015

57mins

Play

Rank #14: 083 - Ed Kashi

Podcast cover
Read more

Ed Kashi is a critically acclaimed, award-winning photojournalist, filmmaker, speaker, and educator who for 40 years has dedicated himself to documenting many of the social and geopolitical issues that define our times. A sensitive eye and an intimate relationship to his subjects are signatures of his work. A member of the VII Agency since 2010, Ed has been recognized for his complex imagery and its compelling rendering of the human condition.

In addition to editorial assignments, filmmaking and personal projects, Ed is a mentor to students of photography and an active participant in forums and lectures on photojournalism, documentary photography and multimedia. His early adoption of hybrid visual storytelling has produced a number of influential short films. Additionally, his editorial assignments and personal projects have generated eight books, including Curse of the Black Gold: 50 Years of Oil in the Niger Delta, THREE, and [Witness Number 8: Photojournalisms](Witness Number Eight: Photojournalisms).

In 2002, Ed, in partnership with his wife, the writer and filmmaker Julie Winokur, founded Talking Eyes Media, a non-profit company which has subsequently produced numerous award-winning short films, exhibits, books, and multimedia pieces that explore significant social issues. They are currently engaged in a 5-year storytelling project with Rutgers University in Newark called Newest Americans, focused on immigration, for which they recently received a two year grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In episode 083, Ed discusses, among other things:

His early adoption of video in his storytelling

Being all about the issues 

Hitting a Wall in Peru

Using different parts of yourself

Being 100% there

Dealing with the emotional fallout

Experience and image fatigue

Being away for 8 months a year

Witness Number 8: Photojournalisms

Being a mentor and never having had one himself

The importance of creating a body of work

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“...I’m asking people who are sick to let me into there lives. Like, what an asshole if I do that and then I’m not 100% there! Because on some level those people don’t need another person with a camera. So I better have a damned good reason to be getting into their lives and then I need to treat that with dignity and respect and the sort of preciousness of this opportunity that they’re giving me. And if I’m not at 100%, there’s something not good about that.”

THIS EPISODE OF THE PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY THE CHARCOAL BOOK CLUB - THE LATEST AND GREATEST PHOTOBOOKS, EXPERTLY CURATED AND DELIVERED TO YOU DOOR WITH FREE SHIPPING AND NO HASSLES.

**VERY SPECIAL LISTENER OFFER**

USE CODE 'ASMALLVOICE' TO CLAIM A FREE BOOK OF YOUR CHOICE WHEN YOU JOIN!!

INFORM THE MIND, INSPIRE THE SOUL

Jul 11 2018

55mins

Play

Rank #15: 085 - John Stanmeyer

Podcast cover
Read more

John Stanmeyer is an award winning photojournalist, Emmy nominated filmmaker and field recordist who for over 20 years has worked in nearly 100 countries, documenting the social and political issues that define our times.

For ten years, between 1998 and 2008, John was a contract photographer for Time magazine, during which time he produced 18 covers for them and photographed hundreds of stories, including the war in Afghanistan, the fight for independence in East Timor, the fall of Suharto in Indonesia, and other significant world news events. Since 2004 he has worked almost exclusively for National Geographic magazine, producing over 15 stories, including 10 covers.

John is now an Emeritus member of the VII Photo agency which he co-founded in his living room in 2001 with six other of the world’s leading photojournalists. John is the recipient of numerous honors, including the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal, POYi Magazine Photographer of the Year, and numerous World Press Photo, Picture of the Year and NPPA awards. In 2008, his National Geographic cover story on global malaria received the National Magazine Award. In 2012 he was nominated for an Emmy with the documentary film series, Starved for Attention, and in 2014 was the recipient of the World Press Photo award for his photograph taken in Djibouti and titled Signal (above).

John has published a number of books includingIsland of the Spirits, a journalistic/anthropological look at Balinese culture documented during the five years he lived on the island.

John now lives on a farm in West Stockbridge, Massachusetts, with this wife, three children and two dogs. When not on the road he can be found at his gallery and coffeehouse which he opened in 2013, combining photography and education around his passion for great coffee, wrapping the two around ethically procured, human rights-based direct trade with the social issues represented in his photographs.

In episode 085, John discusses, among other things:

Social media = publishing

Communication

Workshops as dialogues

Not seeing mistakes as mistakes

Early years - art and fashion

Discovering the ‘unfathomable power’ of reality

The importance of the act of giving

The unique ethos of National Geographic magazine 

Influences Mentioned:

Helmut Newton

Peter Lindbergh

Albert Watson

Arthur Elgort

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“Photography is 99% problem solving and 1% photography wrapped around 100% serendipity and good luck.”

THIS EPISODE OF THE PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY THE CHARCOAL BOOK CLUB- THE LATEST AND GREATEST PHOTOBOOKS, EXPERTLY CURATED AND DELIVERED TO YOU DOOR WITH FREE SHIPPING AND NO HASSLES.

**VERY SPECIAL LISTENER OFFER**

USE CODE 'ASMALLVOICE' TO CLAIM A FREE BOOK OF YOUR CHOICE WHEN YOU JOIN!!

INFORM THE MIND, INSPIRE THE SOUL

Aug 08 2018

1hr 19mins

Play

Rank #16: 005 - Kalpesh Lathigra

Podcast cover
Read more

Kalpesh Lathigra was born and bred in London, England. He studied photojournalism at the London College of Printing (now the London College of Communication), before being awarded what was then a much sought-after traineeship with the Independent Newspaper, which at that time was renowned for a commitment to using excellent photography in a way that many national newspapers in the UK never really had in the past. Kalpesh went on to have a successful freelance career as a newspaper and magazine photograper, shooting features and portraits for most of the major British broadsheets and their weekend magazines and in 2000 he won a first prize (Arts, Singles) in the World Press Awards. A few years later he was awarded the W. Eugene Smith Fellowship for his long-term project about the lives of widows in India: Brides of Krishna. He is still a busy, jobbing editorial photographer, but, alongside that role, he has also developed his own personal practice in which he has attempted to straddle the invisible divide between editorial, documentary photographer and a more authored, artistic sensibility - a state of affairs that we spend much of the interview mulling over. His first book, 'Lost In The Wilderness', which he funded with a Kickstarter campaign, will be published later this Autumn and is the result of 5 years work documenting the native American Lakota Sioux community of the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, USA. (Check links below for updates.) In Episode 005 Kalpesh discusses: Use of the label 'artist'; book project - 'Lost In The Wilderness'; why working is good for the soul; a friendship with Ralph Fiennes; changing his approach to the story; the fight against cliche, the World Press controversy and he danger of cliques

Sep 29 2015

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #17: 008 - Guy Martin

Podcast cover
Read more

Guy Martin’s career began almost exactly ten years ago when in 2006 he graduated from the legendary University of Wales BA course in documentary photography with a first class degree. Since then, he has establishing himself as a successful editorial photographer and his work has appeared in a wide selection of some of the world’s most high profile magazines.
As well as editorial commissions, he has also worked consistently on long-term personal projects - which, as he explains, are hugely important to him - and his latest The City of Dreams, shot in Turkey where he is now based, has been extensively published and exhibited. It’s a clever juxtaposition of two disparate elements involving Turkish soap operas and work from various protests. You can see it on his website (link below) and that is the project he is referrring to in the latter half of the podcast.
During 2011 guy covered the tumultous political upheaval in the middle east and North Africa, which we have subsequently come to refer to as the Arab Spring. He photographed the revolution in Egypt and then, in April of that year, the civil war in Libya. It was there in the besieged city of Misrata that tragedy struck and Guy came very close to losing his life. He and fellow photographers Chris Hondras and Tim Hetherington, two of the most experienced and respected photojournalists of their generation, were caught in heavy fighting and a motar exploded right next to them. Chris and Tim were both killed - a huge and shocking loss which I think is probably still being felt in the photographic community not to mention among those that knew and loved them - but Guy, who was badly injured, survived and got home to England to begin his rehabilitation, which he threw himself into with single-minded determination.
In episode 008, Guy discusses: Relationship with Huck magazine; staying with it until it gets awkward; print being alive and well; the importance of personal projects; Turkey project - The City of Dreams; studying at Newport; tragedy in Misrata

Oct 22 2015

1hr 5mins

Play

Rank #18: 036 - Jocelyn Bain-Hogg

Podcast cover
Read more

After studying Documentary Photography at Newport Art College in Wales, Jocelyn Bain-Hogg began his career as a unit photographer on movie sets, shot publicity stills for the BBC and photographed fashion before returning to his documentary roots where he has largely remained ever since, working on long-term personal projects, editorial assignments and commercial commissions. He is the author of seven photobooks. To name but some of them, his first, The Firm, published in 2001, presented an astonishingly intimate view of London’s organised crime world, and won international acclaim. It was followed up a decade later by The Family, which was premiered as an exhibition at the Visa Pour L'Image festival in Perpignan in 2011 and was published as a photobook by Foto8. His second book, Idols + Believers, an intensive journey into the nature of fame and today’s celebrity culture, was published in 2006 with a touring exhibition shown in London, Paris, New York and Miami and the third, Pleasure Island, looked at the pursuit of pleasure, rock and roll and dance culture in Ibiza. He has got at least two, if not three new projects in the pipeline. In 2008 he was commissioned by Sky News to document the issues surrounding British youth and he is presently continuing this work for Sea Change, a major project started in 2013 documenting youth across Europe, involving an international roster of photographers for which he is photo-director. In addition to the continuing British Youth series, he is working on an innovative book project about his hometown, Tired of London, Tired of Life. Which is a collaboration with artist Paul Davis. Jocelyn is currently course leader on the B.A. photojournalism and documentary photography degree at the London College of Communication and is a member of the VII Photo Agency.

Sep 14 2016

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #19: 103 - Todd Hido

Podcast cover
Read more

Todd Hido is an American photographer born in Ohio and who for many years has been based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He received a BFA from Tufts University in Massachusetts, and an MFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts. He is currently an adjunct professor at the California College of Art in San Francisco. Todd’s images have featured in many publications, have been exhibited widely and are included in various prestigious public and private collections, most notably, Pier 24 Photography in San Francisco which holds the archive of all his published works. He has over a dozen published books to his name, including a mid-career survey entitled Intimate Distance: Twenty-Five Years of Photographs published in 2016 by Aperture, and his most recent monograph is Bright Black World, which was released by Nazraeli Press in 2018 and is already sold out.

In episode 103, Todd discusses, among other things:

  • Discovering photography at school as a C and D student
  • BMX as his first subject matter
  • How the houses at night series began as an ‘establishing shot’
  • Why he values his education as a commercial photographer
  • His mentor, Larry Sultan
  • The joy of being lost in the fog
  • The influence of Jim Dow
  • Collaborating with his female subjects
  • His most recent book Bright Black World

Referenced:

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

“The thing that I always say about meaning and art is that the meaning of the image resides in the viewer. And I think that’s a really true thing. Like in music, what’s the meaning of a song? It means a thousand different things to a thousand different people. And there’s an intention of the artist, but that’s not always what’s the most important thing.”

Episode sponsored by PicDrop, The Charcoal Book Club and Findr.

Apr 17 2019

43mins

Play

Rank #20: 105 - Rebecca Norris Webb and Alex Webb

Podcast cover
Read more

Rebecca Norris Webb was originally a journalist and a poet before falling in love with photography and transitioning to a career that has since incorporated all of those disciplines. Rebecca has produced numerous books and exhibitions, most notably her monograph, My Dakota — an elegy for her brother who died unexpectedly — with a solo exhibition of the work at The Cleveland Museum of Art (2015), among other venues.

Alex Webb is famous for his vibrant, complex colour street photography, especially that from Haiti, Cuba and Mexico, though he has more recently begun shooting on his home soil in the USA. Alex has produced sixteen photo books, won numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2007 and has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1979.

Together, as well as being husband and wife, Alex and Rebecca have shared an abiding creative partnership, collaborating on numerous book projects including Violet Isle, their work form Cuba, Memory City and Slant Rhymes . Their latest collaboration, Brooklyn: The City Within, is a book project about the New York borough which has been their home for many years, and that will be published by aperture entitled in September of 2019. Alex and Rebecca were recently recipients of an NEA grant.

On episode 105, Rebecca and Alex discuss, among other things:

Their first collaboration: Violet Isle
Their respective strengths
Memory City
Slant Rhymes
Their forthcoming book Brooklyn: The City Within
Making book dummies
Advice on collaborating
Future projects individual and together
Referenced:

David Chickey
Teju Cole
John Ashbery
Ilya Kaminsky
Marie Howe
Italo Calvino

Website | Facebook | Instagram

“I think we both realised that we were each others biggest fans, but because we were that we were also very insightful critcs and it was a sense that it would be better if we told each other what we though were the weaknesses of a project before the project went out into the world. And even though that sometimes caused tensions in the marriage, we realised that overall oit was worth going through that creatively...”
— Rebecca Norris Webb

May 15 2019

1hr 9mins

Play