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Business

Sales hacks for startup hustlers

Updated 4 days ago

Business
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Sales hacks for startup hustlers by Steli Efti. Tactics, strategies and sales stories straight from Silicon Valley's most prominent sales hustler. Head over to https://blog.close.com for sales videos and blog posts plus extra materials related to each episode.

Read more

Sales hacks for startup hustlers by Steli Efti. Tactics, strategies and sales stories straight from Silicon Valley's most prominent sales hustler. Head over to https://blog.close.com for sales videos and blog posts plus extra materials related to each episode.

iTunes Ratings

7 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
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1
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Content great - but why all the cussing??

By MikeWilliquette - Dec 09 2019
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Steli does a good job of giving business insights that are valuable to the listener. But why all the absolutely unnecessary cussing?? Do you really need every other sentence to ram the “f” word down our throats? Clean up the content and let’s pursue solid business practice ideas!

Great podcast

By Jennf45 - Aug 29 2017
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Very informative and motivational

iTunes Ratings

7 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
0
1
1
0

Content great - but why all the cussing??

By MikeWilliquette - Dec 09 2019
Read more
Steli does a good job of giving business insights that are valuable to the listener. But why all the absolutely unnecessary cussing?? Do you really need every other sentence to ram the “f” word down our throats? Clean up the content and let’s pursue solid business practice ideas!

Great podcast

By Jennf45 - Aug 29 2017
Read more
Very informative and motivational

Listen to:

Cover image of Sales hacks for startup hustlers

Sales hacks for startup hustlers

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Sales hacks for startup hustlers by Steli Efti. Tactics, strategies and sales stories straight from Silicon Valley's most prominent sales hustler. Head over to https://blog.close.com for sales videos and blog posts plus extra materials related to each episode.

Rank #1: Lean sales: How to get people's attention to validate your idea?

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Have an idea for a startup and want to validate it by following the lean startup methodology? Here's how you get potential prospects to actually engage with you... http://blog.close.io/lean-sales-get-attention

Jun 18 2015

10mins

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Rank #2: I Fired Half My Team

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One of the most difficult things I ever had to do as a CEO was to fire half of my team. Our startup had seen months where we couldn’t keep up with demand, hired dozens and dozens of sales people, trained them, and then came a couple of really bad months. http://blog.close.io/i-fired-half-my-team

Jun 04 2015

22mins

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Rank #3: Cold calling: How to respond to "I don't have time"?

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http://blog.close.io/cold-calling-how-to-respond-to-i-dont-have-time
Cold calling: How to respond to "I don't have time"?
by Steli Efti

When Donald Trump says he has “no time” for political correctness, what he really means is that he’s chosen not to make it a priority.

It’s the same way with your customers. Unless you happen to cold call someone whose office has just caught on fire, it’s pretty likely that “I don’t have time” is just a polite way of saying “Go away,” or “What you’re offering is not a priority for me.” After all, if they really didn’t have time, they would have just hung up on you.

And yet, your average salesperson still hears “I don’t have time,” stammers, gets nervous, and hangs up. It’s a difficult objection to deal with—we’re not used to responding proactively to “I don’t have time.” You can’t really argue with it, because who are you to question whether someone really has time?

A great salesperson, however, finesses this objection around into further conversation. A great salesperson hears “I don’t have time” and recognizes that it’s time to drive home the core value proposition that will get that customer to stay on the line.

Think about it this way. If your potential customer was convinced, deep down, that they could make $8 for every $1 they spent with you, would they still tell you they don’t have time? No! They’d rush to keep you on the phone, and spend as much money with you as they possibly could.

"The main thing when you are engaged with a client, dream client, or prospect is to create value during every interaction. The more value you create, the more valuable you are to your client. The greater the perception of value, the greater the likelihood you gain a commitment that moves you forward together."—Anthony Iannarino

Your #1 job when someone tells you they don’t have time is to demonstrate all the value and upside you can bring them, proving that you are worth their time.

You need to work around this objection by showing the value at every turn, whether this objection pops up early in the sales cycle, or later and more insidiously, toward the end of the process.

Early stage objection

No one likes getting cold called, and the “I don’t have time” objection is often a polite way of shooing you away early in a call. But this knee-jerk reaction is your chance as a salesperson to differentiate yourself and your product from the swarm of telemarketers out there selling candy and cable upgrades.

At this stage, you need to acknowledge the value of your customer’s time, and show them why they should give it to you. Emphasize with their position, but make sure you grab their attention and hook them on value.

Sales rep: “Hey, I get that, maybe it’s not worth your time! The last seven people in your field who I talked to said that as well. And they were all wrong. Just give me three minutes to see if you’re right—let’s confirm that talking to me is not a wise investment of your time.”

Be polite, charming, and decisive. Give them compelling proof for why they should stay on the line, and why they’d be missing out if they hung up. Most customers will be willing to give you a few more minutes—which is all you need to start establishing value.

Pitch to priorities

Use this time to show how your product or service can help them meet their goals today. Pitch to their priorities by asking questions.

Ask questions that will help you understand what your customer's needs are, while demonstrating your expertise and authority in the field:

What is your number one priority at this point? Because if you’re like the other customers I talk to in the field, your number one goal for next quarter is ______.
Is this something that matches your priorities or are you thinking something totally different?
If not, what are your top priorities right now

May 22 2017

9mins

Play

Rank #4: Sales Hack: "How To Use Your Customers Contracts To Close Deals Faster" by @Steli from Close.io

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http://close.io/free-sales-course/
Where to find a letter of intent (LOI) or contract that you can send to a prospect willing to buy? If you just send them an LOI or contract it will get stuck in their legal & procurement department and slow down your sales process. Here's a quick sales hack to accelerate the sale and close the deal faster. For more startup sales advice check out

Dec 29 2015

3mins

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Rank #5: "Subject Lines That Get Your Sales Emails Opened" by @closeio

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Want to increase your open rates? Don't follow the wide-spread advice you find on the net. Here's what really gets your prospects to open your emails...
Read the full blog post ► http://blog.close.io/subject-lines

Aug 10 2015

11mins

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Rank #6: Danielle Diamond, Rebel Motion & User Interviews: A Filmmaker's Advice for Storytelling in Sales

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CLOSE.IO WOMEN IN SALES INTERVIEW SERIES
blog.close.io/topic/women-in-sales
Host: Rebecca Luo, Close.io Account Executive rebecca@close.io, @rebeccatluo
Listen: iTunes, Soundcloud, & your favorite podcast app
Watch: YouTube

Danielle Diamond (@dhopediamond) is a Content Creator at User Interviews (https://www.userinterviews.com), the Director of Marketing at Rebel Motion (https://www.rebel-motion.com/), and a Screenwriter at ScreenPower. Danielle was previously a conversational marketer of video at Drift. She’s had numerous experiences in film production and marketing, and graduated from Boston University with a Bachelor’s degree in Film and Television.

Episode highlights:
How Danielle got an early life start in filmmaking
Danielle feels that film sets have a lot to learn from how businesses are operated. This is part of what influenced her desire to orient her career towards sales & marketing
Danielle's storytelling structure, with her piece of advice of how "people don't care about your product, they care about their problem"
How Danielle was able to land her sales & marketing role at Drift without prior traditional experience in the field
Danielle's remote work experience with three companies simultaneously

Aug 09 2018

30mins

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Rank #7: Nicole Wolosoff, Boston National Title Agency: Starting Conversations & Attracting Opportunities

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CLOSE.IO WOMEN IN SALES INTERVIEW SERIES
blog.close.io/topic/women-in-sales
Host: Rebecca Luo, Close.io Account Executive rebecca@close.io, @rebeccatluo
Listen: iTunes, Soundcloud, & your favorite podcast app
Watch: YouTube

Nicole Wolosoff (https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicolewolosoff/) is the President of the New York Operation of Boston National Title Agency (https://www.bostonnationaltitle.com/en/). Prior to joining Boston National, Nicole served as the Vice President, Director of Operations and Underwriting Counsel at Insignia Title Agency. Before that, she was Vice President and Counsel at Langdon Title Agency. Nicole graduated from New York University’s School of Law LLM in Taxation Program, and earned her J.D. from the New York Law School and her bachelor’s from Towson University.

Episode Highlights

- From an early age, Nicole learn about the law of attraction and knew that she was destined for law school
- How Nicole used a dorky technique as a conversation opener at the early stages of her career
- How Nicole got her first internship, which set her up for career opportunities upon graduating from law school
- Jen's "choreographed" routine at networking events
- Jen's advice to salespeople is to "always be on" and "always be listening”

Jul 26 2018

28mins

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Rank #8: International sales expansion: How to start selling into foreign markets?

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A proven 4-step process to start selling into foreign markets. Read the blog post at http://blog.close.io/international-sales-expansion

Oct 08 2015

13mins

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Rank #9: 2 common B2B SaaS sales objections and how to handle them

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Level up: http://close.io/free-sales-course | [1-2 sentence blurb about this video.] | Related blog post here: http://blog.close.io/[insert_URL]

Want more videos? Subscribe ►http://bit.ly/subcloseio

CONNECT WITH US
Blog: http://blog.close.io
Twitter: https://twitter.com/closeio
Facebook: https://facebook.com/closeio
Instagram: http://instagram.com/close.io
Linkedin: https://linkedin.com/company/elastic-...

ABOUT CLOSE.IO
The sales CRM sales people love - no more manual data entry. Customer management with built-in calling and email synchronization. Make and receive calls while taking notes tied to each address book contact -- all without leaving the application. On this channel we share startup sales advice and Close.io tutorials.

Feb 15 2016

10mins

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Rank #10: "Maybes Are killing your startup" by @Steli from Close.io

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"Maybes Are killing your startup" by @Steli from Close.io http://blog.close.io/

Jun 08 2015

5mins

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Rank #11: Spark.me 2015 - Steli Efti - How Silicon Valley Made Me Think Small

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Here's a talk Steli gave on May 31, 2015 in Montenegro, one of the biggest tech conferences in the Balkan region. He talks about the power of thinking small; firing half his team and dancing to N'Sync's Bye Bye Bye; being more productive in fewer hours; and getting your hands dirty to build your startup, instead of playing with the latest shiny little toy—and more advice that will help you get sh!t done instead of being busy.

Read the full blog post and watch the video of the talk ► http://blog.close.io/startup-talk-spark-me-2015

Oct 13 2015

31mins

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Rank #12: Why You Need To Call Your Churning Customers (And How To Do It Right)

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Your churning customers can your greatest teachers. Here's how you can learn from them how to build a bigger, better SaaS business. http://blog.close.io/call-your-churning-customers

Oct 21 2015

15mins

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Rank #13: Alicia Cornell, Shopify Plus: "Breaking Up" and Falling Back In Love with Sales

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CLOSE.IO WOMEN IN SALES INTERVIEW SERIES http://blog.close.io/topic/women-in-sales
Host: Rebecca Luo, account executive at Close.io rebecca@close.io, @rebeccatluo

Alicia Cornell is a Sales Manager at Shopify Plus (alicia@shopify.com).

Alicia graduated from Carleton University in Ottawa, and shortly after joined McGraw-Hill Ryerson, the Canadian division of McGraw-Hill, an educational publishing house. After a few years selling there, she traded in textbooks for e-commerce software and joined Shopify in 2014, where she was previously a manager for the Shopify Partner Program, and worked on the Enterprise sales team.

Alicia has always been a true student of the sales game, but at one point during her career, as the top salesperson on her team, she took a break from sales. Her heart told her to explore other functions within Shopify, which she did, only to eventually fall back in love with the craft of sales.

May 10 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #14: How To Use UX To Design High - Converting Cold Emails, Calls, And Product Demos

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Check out the full blog post here: http://blog.close.io/user-experience-in-sales

Too many sales reps focus shortsightedly on the close. Because that's the moment they earn a commission. But there's a lot that happens leading up to that moment.

Today, I want to share how you can close more deals with less effort by designing a better buying experience.
Too many sales reps focus shortsightedly on the close. Because that's the moment they earn a commission. But there's a lot that happens leading up to that moment.

Today, I want to share how you can close more deals with less effort by designing a better buying experience.

It doesn't matter what part of the sales process you're focused on:

the cold email
the qualification
the sales call
the product demo
the meeting
the close
You can take insights from UX designers, and apply them to your sales approach to unlock massive sales growth. Stop chasing after prospects, and instead make them want to engage with you.

While everyone's trying to scale, automate, and optimize every touchpoint with their prospects, you can win by focusing on the quality of their experience. Zig when everyone's zagging.

More here: http://blog.close.io/user-experience-in-sales

May 22 2018

21mins

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Rank #15: The old-school sales rejection hack @Close.io

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Rejection can eat a sales soul up and spit it out. Here's how sales people have been turning it into their advantage for decades already..
http://blog.close.io/sales-rejection-hack

Jul 27 2015

10mins

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Rank #16: Purpose-driven motivation: 2 Uber drivers taught me how

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Feeling unmotivated to work on mundane and seemingly meaningless tasks? Here's how you can fuel everything you do with a higher purpose. http://blog.close.io/purpose-driven-motivation

Jul 28 2015

8mins

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Rank #17: Wolf Or Lamb in SaaS Sales?

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What's the right attitude, mindset and energy to sell SaaS products? Many people, particularly those whose first profession isn't sales get this wrong. Read the full blog post http://blog.close.io/wolf-or-lamb

Aug 05 2015

8mins

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Rank #18: What I learned from Jack Welch about sales recruitment

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http://blog.close.io/sales-recruiting-culture Why you should hire for cultural fit, and how to do it correctly.

Jul 20 2015

13mins

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Rank #19: Looking stupid in the name of progress: old dudes on skateboards

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When was the last time you did something that made you feel like you looked stupid to others? http://blog.close.io/stupid-skateboards

Sep 10 2015

4mins

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Rank #20: 3 simple steps to sell high-tech products to low-tech buyers

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Related blog post here: http://blog.close.io/sell-high-tech-products-to-low-tech-buyers?utm_campaign=yt_description&utm_medium=video&utm_source=youtube
You did it. You developed the next great tech product. The features are endless, the benefits innumerable. It’s a game-changer. So you meet with prospect— traditional buyers— and recite all the ways your solution changes everything. You provide diagrams and data. You discuss industry trends and the future.

But that’s when you see them. The blank stares.

You realize that your traditional buyers just aren’t comfortable with innovative technology. They don’t like change. They don’t get why your product is such a big deal. (It's a common scenario when selling high-tech products, and we cover more on this topic in our free Startup Sales Success course.)

So where’d you lose them? The answer is pretty simple.

You never discussed the cost of ignoring such an opportunity.

Remember this formula:

The Past + FOMO

In these situations, my advice is always the same: relate your new technology to something that happened in the past, then connect it to one of the most powerful motivators in sales—the fear of missing out.

Let’s say you’ve developed a social media ad platform and you want to sell it to car dealers.

Dealers aren’t typically innovative and tech-savvy buyers, but they spend tons of money. If you start with next-generation features and the future of advertising, they’re going to think your pitch is bullshit.

You’ll get questions like, “How does this make any sense for us?” and “How’s this going to help us sell cars?”

When buyers feel overwhelmed, intimidated, or confused, the pitch gets difficult.

Ask yourself the following question:

What was the last technology to disrupt how dealerships do business?

A recent example is Google AdWords. Paid search advertising was something dealers ignored until they could no longer afford to do so. In the beginning, many of them still funneled their ad spends into newspapers, billboards, and TV. The few dealers who invested early in AdWords understood the way people would shop for cars in the future. They saw an opportunity to build expertise in a platform that would give them a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

With this in mind, let’s use AdWords to sell your high-tech product to low-tech buyers.

Step 1: Relate to the past

Remind low-tech buyers of a time when they came upon a new technology too late. Start with something like:
Remember the early days of Google AdWords? Dealers weren’t spending money on paid search. The whole thing seemed crazy, right? Who’s looking for cars on the internet? Most dealers had no clue what it meant for their business.

By recalling a time when technology felt confusing, even esoteric, you’re letting them admit to prior insecurities. They likely weren’t one of the first AdWords adopters, so they know how much it sucked, how much it hurt, when they missed out on a technology that could have provided a competitive advantage. By relating to the past, you’re handing them something tangible—a previous mistake.

Step 2: Pitch the present

This is when you discuss all the great things your new ad platform has to offer. Try this:

I’m going to share something that may seem weird or intimidating, but in the next five years, every one of your competitors will be using this platform. What I’m about to show you, most dealers would ignore. Most dealers would wait until it’s too late.

You’re telling them that this uneasy feeling is the same one their competitors have. It’s what they’ve all felt whenever they encounter new technology.

Explain that your social media ad platform already reaches 500 million people. Highlight major successes with your current run of advertisers. Talk about features, benefits, and your approach to advertising. Do all of this.

But do it after you’ve related your platform to a past technology that’s now become industry standard.

Step 3: Show them the future ....

Apr 08 2017

12mins

Play