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Humanitarian Innovation Conference 2015: Facilitating Innovation

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The Humanitarian Innovation Conference 2015, #HIP2015, was hosted by the Humanitarian Innovation Project, in partnership with the World Humanitarian Summit, in Oxford on 17 and 18 July 2015. The theme of the conference was ‘facilitating innovation’. As interest and dialogue around humanitarian innovation continues to expand, conference participants were invited to explore the challenges of creating an enabling environment for humanitarian innovation. In the lead up to the World Humanitarian Summit 2016, a key focus of the conference explored how we enable innovation by and for affected communities. What does it mean to take a human-centred approach seriously, and to engage in co-creation with affected populations? It also sought to examine what facilitation means across the wider humanitarian ecosystem, and how we can better convene the collective talents of people within and across traditional and non-traditional humanitarian actors.

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The Humanitarian Innovation Conference 2015, #HIP2015, was hosted by the Humanitarian Innovation Project, in partnership with the World Humanitarian Summit, in Oxford on 17 and 18 July 2015. The theme of the conference was ‘facilitating innovation’. As interest and dialogue around humanitarian innovation continues to expand, conference participants were invited to explore the challenges of creating an enabling environment for humanitarian innovation. In the lead up to the World Humanitarian Summit 2016, a key focus of the conference explored how we enable innovation by and for affected communities. What does it mean to take a human-centred approach seriously, and to engage in co-creation with affected populations? It also sought to examine what facilitation means across the wider humanitarian ecosystem, and how we can better convene the collective talents of people within and across traditional and non-traditional humanitarian actors.

Cover image of Humanitarian Innovation Conference 2015: Facilitating Innovation

Humanitarian Innovation Conference 2015: Facilitating Innovation

Latest release on Dec 02, 2016

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 1 day ago

Rank #1: Principles for ethical humanitarian innovation

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Alexander Betts (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford) gives a talk for the Considering Ethics in Humanitarian Innovation panel. This presentation explores the range of ethical questions and dilemmas related to humanitarian innovation (HI) and will offer a set of principles for ethical HI to review, based on discussions at workshop held in Oxford in April 2015.

Dec 02 2016

18mins

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Rank #2: The impact of design for humanitarian action: examples from Design without Borders’ projects

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Anjali Bhatnagar (Design without Borders), gives a talk for the Design in Humanitarian Innovation panel. This presentation seeks to demonstrate the importance of design for the humanitarian sector, drawing upon two Design without Borders’ projects to explore both solutions and key elements of the design process and to highlight how design tools are crucial to foster innovation.

Dec 02 2016

19mins

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Rank #3: The ethics of monetary incentives for refugee repatriation

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Mollie Gerver (London School of Economics) gives a talk for the Considering Ethics in Humanitarian Innovation panel. This panel engages with several topics related to ethics and principles for humanitarian innovation.

This presentation will consider not only whether monetary incentive payments themselves are unjust, but whether the UN and NGOs act unjustly when they facilitate such schemes, attempting to resolve two ethical dilemmas concerning such payments: the “Motivation Dilemma” and the “Freedom of Movement Dilemma.”

Dec 02 2016

14mins

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Rank #4: Ethics as a driver for humanitarian innovations

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Anaïs Rességuier (Sciences Po Paris), gives a talk for the Ethics as a driver for humanitarian innovations panel. This panel engages with several topics related to ethics and principles for humanitarian innovation.

‘Ethics as a driver for humanitarian innovations’
This presentation considers the ethical aspirations of humanitarian endeavours as ‘the primary desire to help’, arguing that under this model ethics becomes a fundamental source for humanitarian innovation rather than only a way to regulate it.

Dec 02 2016

19mins

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Rank #5: Energy for the Displaced part three

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Michael Keating and Glada Lahn (Chatham House) give a talk for the Energy for the Displaced panel. This panel discusses ways in which energy for the displaced might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.
Energy for the Displaced
Humanitarian agencies lack the capacity to deliver sustainable and clean energy to refugees and displaced people. This means that hundreds of millions of dollars in donor and refugee money is spent each year on fuels that are burned in highly inefficient and often health-endangering ways. In the case of firewood - still the overwhelming fuel of choice in camps - women and children are at risk from both journeys outside the camp to collect it and inhalation of the smoke. With the developing world hosting the majority of refugees and displaced - and an increasing number living in urban areas - addressing energy needs also combines with complex national energy security and social integration issues. There is a growing range of safer, cleaner, more carbon-efficient methods available, whose cost savings over years would also help ease the burden on an overstretched humanitarian system. However, innovation in this area is inhibited by the system itself. This presentation will discuss ways in which energy might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.

Dec 02 2016

23mins

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Rank #6: Energy for the Displaced part two

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Ben Good (GVEP International) gives a talk for the Energy for the Displaced panel. This panel discusses ways in which energy for the displaced might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.

Energy for the Displaced
Humanitarian agencies lack the capacity to deliver sustainable and clean energy to refugees and displaced people. This means that hundreds of millions of dollars in donor and refugee money is spent each year on fuels that are burned in highly inefficient and often health-endangering ways. In the case of firewood - still the overwhelming fuel of choice in camps - women and children are at risk from both journeys outside the camp to collect it and inhalation of the smoke. With the developing world hosting the majority of refugees and displaced - and an increasing number living in urban areas - addressing energy needs also combines with complex national energy security and social integration issues. There is a growing range of safer, cleaner, more carbon-efficient methods available, whose cost savings over years would also help ease the burden on an overstretched humanitarian system. However, innovation in this area is inhibited by the system itself. This presentation will discuss ways in which energy might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.

Dec 02 2016

17mins

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Rank #7: Energy for the Displaced part one

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Christopher Baker-Brian (BBOXX) gives a talk for the Energy for the Displaced panel. This panel discusses ways in which energy for the displaced might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.
Energy for the Displaced
Humanitarian agencies lack the capacity to deliver sustainable and clean energy to refugees and displaced people. This means that hundreds of millions of dollars in donor and refugee money is spent each year on fuels that are burned in highly inefficient and often health-endangering ways. In the case of firewood - still the overwhelming fuel of choice in camps - women and children are at risk from both journeys outside the camp to collect it and inhalation of the smoke. With the developing world hosting the majority of refugees and displaced - and an increasing number living in urban areas - addressing energy needs also combines with complex national energy security and social integration issues. There is a growing range of safer, cleaner, more carbon-efficient methods available, whose cost savings over years would also help ease the burden on an overstretched humanitarian system. However, innovation in this area is inhibited by the system itself. This presentation will discuss ways in which energy might be delivered more sustainably, with a greater role for the private sector.

Dec 02 2016

12mins

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Rank #8: Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection part three

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Rajith Lakshman (Institute of Development Studies) gives a talk for the Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection panel. This panel examines the use of alternative techniques of data collection for humanitarian protection.

Dec 02 2016

9mins

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Rank #9: Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection part two

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Brad Blitz (Middlesex University) gives a talk for the Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection panel. This panel examines the use of alternative techniques of data collection for humanitarian protection.
Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection
This panel examines the use of alternative techniques of data collection for humanitarian protection. It considers how other providers have sought to gather data on vulnerable populations by including them in the Gallup World Poll, an annual global survey which is nationally representative and conducted across 160 countries. One fundamental problem complicating the task of effective humanitarian protection is absence of accurate data on the populations most affected. While the UNHCR and OCHA collect data on refugees, often their estimates provide a limited demographic profile of those most at risk. The quality of statistical information available on stateless people is even less developed. Yet, the importance of reliable data for effective humanitarian policy cannot be overstated. The UNHCR is a member of the UN Development Group and has endorsed the results-based management approach (RBM) to humanitarian assistance and development, which seeks to apply a measurable, results-based approach to the planning, implementation and assessment of the agency’s activities. The absence of accurate data reduces the chances that the UNCHR will be able measure the effectiveness of its work in this area. Further, since the RBM approach is used across the UN system, the absence of data similarly undermines the utility of this approach for other agencies working on related areas of humanitarian protection and development.

Dec 02 2016

20mins

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Rank #10: Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection part one

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Andrew Rzepa (Senior Consultant, Gallup) gives a talk for the Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection panel. This panel examines the use of alternative techniques of data collection for humanitarian protection. It considers how other providers have sought to gather data on vulnerable populations by including them in the Gallup World Poll, an annual global survey which is nationally representative and conducted across 160 countries.
Developing Data for Humanitarian Protection
This panel examines the use of alternative techniques of data collection for humanitarian protection. It considers how other providers have sought to gather data on vulnerable populations by including them in the Gallup World Poll, an annual global survey which is nationally representative and conducted across 160 countries. One fundamental problem complicating the task of effective humanitarian protection is absence of accurate data on the populations most affected. While the UNHCR and OCHA collect data on refugees, often their estimates provide a limited demographic profile of those most at risk. The quality of statistical information available on stateless people is even less developed. Yet, the importance of reliable data for effective humanitarian policy cannot be overstated. The UNHCR is a member of the UN Development Group and has endorsed the results-based management approach (RBM) to humanitarian assistance and development, which seeks to apply a measurable, results-based approach to the planning, implementation and assessment of the agency’s activities. The absence of accurate data reduces the chances that the UNCHR will be able measure the effectiveness of its work in this area. Further, since the RBM approach is used across the UN system, the absence of data similarly undermines the utility of this approach for other agencies working on related areas of humanitarian protection and development.

Dec 02 2016

22mins

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