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Rank #40 in Social Sciences category

Society & Culture
Science
Social Sciences

Inquiring Minds

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #40 in Social Sciences category

Society & Culture
Science
Social Sciences
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Each week Inquiring Minds brings you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science, politics, and society collide.We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We endeavor to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters with weekly coverage of the latest headlines and probing discussions with leading scientists and thinkers.

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Each week Inquiring Minds brings you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science, politics, and society collide.We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We endeavor to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters with weekly coverage of the latest headlines and probing discussions with leading scientists and thinkers.

iTunes Ratings

754 Ratings
Average Ratings
394
309
14
19
18

Highly recommended

By DellingDog - Mar 17 2018
Read more
Great hosts and guests, interesting and insightful interviews. Highly recommended.

Great!

By clint wolf - Jun 20 2017
Read more
A terrific, very interesting podcast.

iTunes Ratings

754 Ratings
Average Ratings
394
309
14
19
18

Highly recommended

By DellingDog - Mar 17 2018
Read more
Great hosts and guests, interesting and insightful interviews. Highly recommended.

Great!

By clint wolf - Jun 20 2017
Read more
A terrific, very interesting podcast.
Cover image of Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

Latest release on Jan 21, 2020

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Each week Inquiring Minds brings you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science, politics, and society collide.We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We endeavor to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters with weekly coverage of the latest headlines and probing discussions with leading scientists and thinkers.

Rank #1: 34 John Oliver - This World Will Be a Ball of Fire Before It Stops Being Funny

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In late April, former Daily Show correspondent John Oliver kicked off his HBO news-satire program, Last Week Tonight. Oliver, who spent nearly eight years at The Daily Show and has a solid background in political satire, is off to a good start. His weekly series—which offers biting commentary on the past week's biggest news stories, both national and international—is barely into its inaugural season, and it seems to be hitting the right notes. The premiere episode, for example, featured an exclusive televised interview with Gen. Keith Alexander (Ret.), his first since stepping down as director of the National Security Agency.
In another recent episode, Oliver expressed his frustration with the so-called climate "debate" in America by staging a more representative debate between a few climate skeptics and nearly a hundred scientists. One of the guys on the correct side of the "debate" was Bill Nye, who was booked for the show basically at the last minute.
"We just wanted to really play with that idea that the very fact that the climate debate is framed as a debate at all is problematic," Oliver says. On Inquiring Minds this week, guest host Asawin Suebsaeng talked to John Oliver about Last Week Tonight, politics, climate change, and how he went about finding a, um, very specific kind of model for the show.
This episode also features a discussion of surprising new scientific findings about why we don't remember much from our childhoods—because we were so busy growing new brain cells.
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
RSS: feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds
Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/inquiring-minds

May 15 2014

46mins

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Rank #2: 113 Robert Sapolsky - Being Human

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Robert Sapolsky is a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, and a research associate with the Institute of Primate Research at the National Museum of Kenya.

We talked to Sapolsky about what it means to be human, what we humans can learn from other species, and why he—despite being a self-described pessimist—feels optimistic about our prospects as a species.

This week’s episode was recorded live in San Francisco for the 2015 Bay Area Science Festival and was produced in collaboration with The Leakey Foundation and their podcast Origin Stories.

http://leakeyfoundation.org/
http://leakeyfoundation.org/originstories

http://patreon.com/inquiringminds

Dec 04 2015

1hr 7mins

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Rank #3: 17 Michael Pollan - The Science of Eating Well (And Not Falling For Diet Fads)

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The Paleo diet is hot. Those who follow it are attempting, they say, to mimic our ancient ancestors—minus the animal-skin fashions and the total lack of technology, of course. The adherents eschew what they believe comes from modern agriculture (wheat, dairy, legumes, for instance) and rely instead on meals full of meat, nuts, and vegetables—foods they claim are closer to what hunter-gatherers ate.
The trouble with that view, however, is that what they’re eating is probably nothing like the diet of hunter-gatherers, says Michael Pollan, author of a number of best-selling books on food and agriculture, including Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. "I don't think we really understand well the proportions in the ancient diet," argues Pollan on this week’s episode. "Most people who tell you with great confidence that this is what our ancestors ate—I think they're kind of blowing smoke."
This week on the show, guest host Cynthia Graber has a wide-ranging conversation with Pollan that covers the science and history of cooking, the importance of microbes—tiny organisms such as bacteria—in our diet, and surprising new research on the intelligence of plants.
This episode also features a discussion of the new popular physics book Trespassing on Einstein's Lawn, by Amanda Gefter, and new research suggesting that the purpose of sleep is to clean cellular waste substances out of your brain.
Subscribe:
itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds

Jan 16 2014

57mins

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Rank #4: Science Got Women Wrong

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We talk to science journalist and author Angela Saini about her latest book Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story.

Jan 23 2018

51mins

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Rank #5: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains

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We talk to neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux, author of the new book The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains.

Nov 19 2019

39mins

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Rank #6: 6 Jonathan Haidt - This is Why Your Political Opponents Hate You

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Why is America so polarized? Why are our politicians so dysfunctional? Why do they sometimes even seem to downright hate each other?
In this episode of Inquiring Minds, moral psychologist and bestselling The Righteous Mind author Jonathan Haidt explains that our differences are, at root, the result of sharply contrasting moral systems and the emotions that underlie them. These emotions differ from left to right. And in politics, we feel first and think later.
As a result, even though political partisans today tend to think their adversaries are wrong and immoral, the truth is actually that they are too moral, albeit in a far more visceral than intellectual sense.
This episode also contains a discussion of Glenn Beck's recent flubbing of basic statistics, and of why a primate species—the marmoset—may in some ways be better at communicating than today's Democrats and Republicans.
Subscribe:
itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds

Oct 25 2013

39mins

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Rank #7: 157 Erik Vance - The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal

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We talk to science writer Erik Vance about his new book Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal.

Nov 25 2016

33mins

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Rank #8: 134 Anders Ericsson - How to Do Everything Better

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Does it take 10,000 hours to become an expert at something? Probably not, says our guest this week—who happens to be the author of the paper which was the basis for Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule in the first place.

We talk to psychologist Anders Ericsson about his new book Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.

May 20 2016

55mins

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Rank #9: 105 Brad Voytek - We Neuroscientists Don't Really Know What Your Brain Is Doing

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The website for neuroscientist Brad Voytek’s lab begins like this: “Do not buy into the false belief that neuroscientists actually know what the brain is doing.” On the show this week we talked to Voytek to find out what he actually means by that.

Brad Voytek is an Assistant Professor of Computational Cognitive Science and Neuroscience at UC San Diego.

Oct 09 2015

59mins

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Rank #10: 54 Steven Pinker - The Science Behind Writing Well

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San Francisco! Come see us interview Adam Savage live on Oct. 28!
http://www.bayareascience.org/event/im-story-collider/
On the show this week we talk to celebrated Harvard cognitive scientist and psycholinguist Steven Pinker about his new book The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.
Pinker explains how to write in clear, "classic" prose that shares valuable information with clarity (but never condescension). He also tells us why so many of the tut-tutting grammar "rules" that we all think we're supposed to follow—don't split infinitives, don't use the passive voice, don't end a sentence with a preposition—are just nonsense.
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
RSS: feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds
Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/inquiring-minds

Oct 02 2014

48mins

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Rank #11: A Pianist Rebuilds Her Brain

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We talk to author Andrea J. Buchanan about her experience with a brain injury and how she used playing the piano to recover. Buchanan’s new book is The Beginning of Everything: The Year I Lost My Mind and Found Myself.

Aug 21 2018

44mins

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Rank #12: Steven Pinker: Enlightenment Now

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We talk with cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker about his recent book Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.

Sep 27 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #13: The Broad Potential of Psychoactive Drugs

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We talk to journalist and science writer Hamilton Morris about his Viceland docuseries “Hamilton's Pharmacopeia” and the history and science of psychoactive drugs.

Feb 27 2018

42mins

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Rank #14: 55 Daniel Levitin - The Organized Mind

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On the show this week we talk to cognitive psychologist, neuroscientist, musician, and writer Daniel Levitin about his new book The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload.
We also talk to microbiologist Siouxsie Wiles about the Ebola virus—what the risks really are, and why many people might be overreacting.
Also, Chris has a huge announcement.
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
RSS: feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds
Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/inquiring-minds

Oct 10 2014

1hr 9mins

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Rank #15: 183 Dean Buonomano - The Neuroscience and Physics of Time

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We talk to neuroscientist Dean Buonomano about his new book “Your Brain Is a Time Machine: The Neuroscience and Physics of Time.”

Jun 19 2017

52mins

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Rank #16: Why Buddhism is True

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We talk to journalist, scholar, and prize-winning author Robert Wright about his latest book Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment.

Sep 18 2017

45mins

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Rank #17: 28 John Hibbing - The Biology of Ideology

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Thomas Jefferson was a smart dude. And in one of his letters to John Adams, dated June 27, 1813, Jefferson made an observation about the nature of politics that science is only now, two centuries later, beginning to confirm. "The same political parties which now agitate the United States, have existed through all time," wrote Jefferson. "The terms of Whig and Tory belong to natural, as well as to civil history," he later added. "They denote the temper and constitution of mind of different individuals."
Tories were the British conservatives of Jefferson's day, and Whigs were the British liberals. What Jefferson was saying, then, was that whether you call yourself a Whig or a Tory has as much to do with your psychology or disposition as it has to do with your ideas. At the same time, Jefferson was also suggesting that there's something pretty fundamental and basic about Whigs (liberals) and Tories (conservatives), such that the two basic political factions seem to appear again and again in the world, and have for "all time."
Jefferson didn't have access to today's scientific machinery—eye tracker devices, skin conductance sensors, and so on. Yet these very technologies are now being used to reaffirm his insight. At the center of the research are many scholars working at the intersection of psychology, biology, and politics, but one leader in the field is John Hibbing, a political scientist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln whose "Political Physiology Laboratory" has been producing some pretty stunning results.
This week, we talk to Hibbing about his research and what he says we actually do now know about these important differences between liberals and conservatives.
This episode also features a discussion of whether we are finally on the verge of curing AIDS, and new research suggesting that great landscape painters, like JMW Turner, were actually able to capture the trace of volcanic eruptions, and other forms of air pollution, in the color of their sunsets.
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/inquiring-minds/id711675943
RSS: feeds.feedburner.com/inquiring-minds
Stitcher: stitcher.com/podcast/inquiring-minds

Apr 04 2014

45mins

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Rank #18: 99 Marc Lewis - Why Addiction Is Not a Disease

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Marc Lewis is a neuroscientist, professor of developmental psychology, and author of the new book The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease. On the show this week we talk to Lewis about the biology of addiction—and what it does to our brains.

Aug 21 2015

52mins

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Rank #19: 135 Sean Carroll - Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself

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We talk to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his latest book The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself.

Jun 03 2016

51mins

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Rank #20: The Material That Will Revolutionize the World

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We talk to chemist Joseph Meany about his book Graphene: The Superstrong, Superthin, and Superversatile Material That Will Revolutionize the World.

Aug 14 2018

48mins

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We need a better, more democratic internet

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We talk to professor of information studies at UCLA and director of the UC Digital Cultures Lab Ramesh Srinivasan about his new book Beyond the Valley: How Innovators around the World are Overcoming Inequality and Creating the Technologies of Tomorrow.

Jan 21 2020

38mins

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2019 Year End Wrap-Up

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Indre, along with fellow neuroscientist and person who is her husband, Adam Bristol, recap their favorite science stories and interviews of 2019.

Dec 31 2019

32mins

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We might be approaching the study of cancer all wrong

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We talk to oncologist, professor of medicine, and director of the MDS Center at Columbia University Azra Raza about her new book The First Cell: And the Human Costs of Pursuing Cancer to the Last.

Dec 23 2019

49mins

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Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution

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We talk to environmental journalist Beth Gardiner about her new book Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution.

Dec 16 2019

39mins

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The Blockchain and the Future of Everything

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We talk to Michael Casey, Senior Advisor for Blockchain Opportunities at MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative, about his new book, co-authored with Paul Vigna, The Truth Machine: The Blockchain and the Future of Everything.

Dec 03 2019

40mins

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The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains

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We talk to neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux, author of the new book The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains.

Nov 19 2019

39mins

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How Language Shapes Thought

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We talk to cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsk about how language can influence the way we think.

Nov 12 2019

47mins

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The History, Science, and Future of Heart Disease

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We talk to cardiologist, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his new book State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.

Oct 29 2019

45mins

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The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini

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We talk to author and journalist Joe Posnanski about his new book The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini.

Oct 22 2019

45mins

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Silicon Valley: A Satire

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We talk to New York Times writer and journalist Matt Richtel about his new novel, written under the pen name A. B. Jewell, called The Man Who Wouldn't Die.

Oct 16 2019

26mins

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Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime

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We talk to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his new book Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.

Oct 08 2019

37mins

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The Science of Behavior-Altering Parasites

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We talk to parasitologist and co-author of Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything, Kelly Weinersmith.

Oct 01 2019

38mins

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Why We Need Insects

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We talk to professor of conservation biology Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson about her new book Buzz, Sting, Bite: Why We Need Insects.

Sep 24 2019

34mins

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Kishore’s Send-Off!

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After nearly 5 years of co-hosting Inquiring Minds, Kishore is heading off to conquer the rest of the science world. He has been an incredible friend to us at the show, and we’re sad to see him go, but excited to see what amazing things he does next. Thanks, Kishore. If you want to reach out to him, he’s @sciencequiche on Twitter.

Sep 17 2019

15mins

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Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes

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We talk to science journalist David Robson about his new book The Intelligence Trap: Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes.

Sep 03 2019

40mins

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Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World

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We talk to sports and science writer David Epstein about his latest book Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World.

Aug 13 2019

53mins

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Sharks: The Ocean's Most Mysterious, Most Misunderstood, and Most Important Guardians

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We talk to ocean conservationist William McKeever about his new book Emperors of the Deep: Sharks--The Ocean's Most Mysterious, Most Misunderstood, and Most Important Guardians.

Aug 07 2019

46mins

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A Brief Guide to the Fundamental Mystery of the Mind

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We talk to author Annaka Harris about her new book Conscious: A Brief Guide to the Fundamental Mystery of the Mind.

Jul 30 2019

35mins

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The American Automobile: Past, Present, and Driverless

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We talk to writer Dan Albert about his new book Are We There Yet?: The American Automobile Past, Present, and Driverless.

Jul 17 2019

50mins

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Neal Stephenson - Fall; or, Dodge in Hell

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We talk to celebrated speculative fiction writer Neal Stephenson about his latest book Fall; or, Dodge in Hell: A Novel.

Jul 02 2019

32mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

754 Ratings
Average Ratings
394
309
14
19
18

Highly recommended

By DellingDog - Mar 17 2018
Read more
Great hosts and guests, interesting and insightful interviews. Highly recommended.

Great!

By clint wolf - Jun 20 2017
Read more
A terrific, very interesting podcast.