Cover image of KQED's The California Report
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Rank #38 in Daily News category

Daily News
News
Politics

KQED's The California Report

Updated 12 days ago

Rank #38 in Daily News category

Daily News
News
Politics
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KQED’s statewide radio news program, providing daily coverage of issues, trends, and public policy decisions affecting California and its diverse population.

Read more

KQED’s statewide radio news program, providing daily coverage of issues, trends, and public policy decisions affecting California and its diverse population.

iTunes Ratings

200 Ratings
Average Ratings
160
19
8
4
9

Super reporting from John Sepulvado!

By monthly amtrak traveler - Sep 07 2018
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Professional, engaging, crisp, dynamic, humane, and smart, Sepulvado reports on news that matters

great coverage of CA news

By DorliB - Mar 16 2018
Read more
Well done podcast highlighting California news that one might not hear about otherwise.

iTunes Ratings

200 Ratings
Average Ratings
160
19
8
4
9

Super reporting from John Sepulvado!

By monthly amtrak traveler - Sep 07 2018
Read more
Professional, engaging, crisp, dynamic, humane, and smart, Sepulvado reports on news that matters

great coverage of CA news

By DorliB - Mar 16 2018
Read more
Well done podcast highlighting California news that one might not hear about otherwise.
Cover image of KQED's The California Report

KQED's The California Report

Latest release on May 29, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 12 days ago

Rank #1: Mom-and-Pop Shops Prepare to Re-Open at LA’s Flower Mart

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Newsom: Some Retailers Can Re-Open

Nearly two months after many California businesses shut their doors to slow the spread of the coronavirus, some retailers and manufacturers are re-opening, just a little bit, starting today.
Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED

Mom-and-Pop Shops Prepare to Re-Open at LA’s Flower Mart

Small shops prepare for a partial reopening and hope they can make enough sales to stay open.
Guest: Marta Hernandez, flower shop owner

Why Some People Can’t Get Unemployment Benefits

Millions of newly jobless people have filed for unemployment benefits since March. In California, many who’ve applied aren’t getting their payments, for several reasons. One of them is something known as “false claim penalty cases.” These are people who either tried to defraud the state when they filed for unemployment in the past, or just made honest mistakes when filling out complicated paperwork.
Guest: Kaila Hoppe, unemployed television costumer

Working Actors Find Residuals Reduce Their Unemployment

Turns out, there are a lot of ways to lose your unemployment check, or at least part of it. Consider the plight of working actors. Work they did years ago, can count against their current unemployment benefits, just when they need them most.
Reporter: David Wagner, KPCC

May 08 2020

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Rank #2: Silicon Valley Is Still Hiring, At Least For Now

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With Revenues Down, California’s Budget Outlook is Bleak

Less than an hour ago, the state of California released a snapshot of what the coronavirus pandemic has done to the state’s finances. And the numbers are bad. Surging unemployment and business closures mean the state is projecting a drop of more than 25 percent in both personal income tax and sales tax revenues, and a more than 20 percent decline in corporate taxes. Mix this all together we’re looking at a $41 billion dollar drop in state revenue compared to projections in January. This comes as the state spends more on health care to deal with the pandemic.
Guest: H.D. Palmer, California Department of Finance

First ICE Detainee Dies of COVID-19 at Otay Mesa

A sixth prisoner at the Terminal Island federal detention center in San Pedro has died from COVID-19.  And more than half of the facility’s thousand inmates have tested positive for coronavirus, as well as fourteen staffers. This makes Terminal Island, which is in between the Ports of L.A and Long Beach, one of the most significant concentrations of coronavirus cases in the state. Meanwhile, a detainee in Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody has died of COVID-19. He was being held at the Otay Mesa Detention Center in San Diego County. This marks the first coronavirus death in ICE custody nationwide.
Reporter: Max Rivlin-Nadler, KPBS

Beef Shortage in California? Not Likely

There’s been much talk recently about whether America’s supply of beef and poultry is threatened, as workers in meat processing plants test positive for the coronavirus, forcing those facilities to temporarily close. Meat suppliers in California say there will be changes, but no shortages.
Reporter: Alex Hall, KQED

Librarians Make Good Contact Tracers

UC-San Francisco is launching a statewide effort to train 20,000 new contact tracers. These are the disease detectives who connect the dots between people who have COVID-19 and the people they’ve come into contact with… and may have infected. Individuals who might have a particular knack for the job are librarians.
Reporter: April Dembosky, KQED

Details Emerge on California’s Contract to Buy Masks from Chinese Company

State officials are releasing details of a huge and secretive contract for California to purchase protective gear from China. This follows reporting from the L.A. Times. The document trail reveals the Newsom administration scrambling to acquire hospital masks in the absence of federal leadership.
Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor

New Website Features Map of Coronavirus Testing Sites

Many people want to get tested to see if they’re infected with coronavirus. But where? Governor Newson has announced a new interactive map Californians can use to find COVID-19 testing locations nearby.
Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics

Silicon Valley Is Still Hiring, For Now…

A lot of California industries are laying off employees. But companies in Silicon Valley are actually hiring people—a lot of people. It’s a good time to be in the market for a mid-level white collar job in web development and tech support.
Reporter: Rachael Myrow, Silicon Valley Desk Editor, KQED

May 07 2020

12mins

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Rank #3: Newsom Says Business Can Reopen, A Little Bit

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Newsom Says Business Can Reopen, A Little Bit

Governor Gavin Newsom announcing that the Golden State can start to reopen, at least a little bit, beginning as soon as Friday.

State Finances Take Hit from Coronavirus

This crisis has taken a huge bite out of state tax revenue… just as the demand for California’s social safety programs is skyrocketing. All those people in need put extra pressure on state finances.
Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics

Immigrant Activists Want Stimulus Checks for Undocumented

An L.A.-based immigrant advocacy group is pushing for all immigrants to be included in economic and health recovery efforts from the pandemic.
Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED

Working Hollywood Copes with Coronavirus Shutdown

Like with other industries, the coronavirus pandemic has shut down Hollywood. And that’s been disastrous for all the companies that supply goods and services to film and television productions.
Guest: Mikel Elliot, CEO of Quixote Studios

Mariposa County’s Successful Contract Tracing Effort

Mariposa County, which includes Yosemite National Park, confirmed its first coronavirus case last week. Within a few days that jumped to thirteen cases. County officials say they’re containing the spread.
Reporter: Laura Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio

In-Home Healthcare Workers Lack PPE

In-home supportive services workers help older, disabled people in their homes—so they don’t have to seek care elsewhere. Many of these minimum wage workers say the state hasn’t provided them with enough personal protective equipment during the coronavirus pandemic. Now, shipments of N-95 masks and gloves have finally arrived, but there’s a catch. Only those who have been exposed to COVID-19 have access.
Reporter: Julie Chang, KQED

Consumer Privacy Advocates Want Stricter Rules

The California Consumer Privacy Act created new rights around how businesses collect and share our personal information. Now the group Californians for Consumer Privacy has announced it’s submitting voter signatures to qualify a new measure for the November ballot. It would create even stricter rules to protect users’ privacy.
Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED

May 05 2020

13mins

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Rank #4: California City Attorneys Sue Uber and Lyft Over Worker Misclassification

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California City Attorneys Sue Uber and Lyft Over Worker Misclassification

The state of California and some cities are suing Uber and Lyft for misclassifying their drivers as contractors and denying them access to employee benefits like unemployment insurance, which is especially needed during the pandemic.
Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED

Advocates Call For Prisoner Release As Inmate Cases Grow

More than 200 prisoners at California Institution for Men in San Bernardino County have tested positive for COVID-19 along with 44 staff members. One inmate has died, while four have been released. Prison officials say another 287 inmates have tests pending.
Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED

Children With Undocumented Parents Are Being Denied Federal Aid

A federal law providing coronavirus emergency aid discriminates against millions of U.S. citizen kids by denying them payments because their parents are undocumented. That’s according to a class-action lawsuit on behalf of these children — including roughly 1 million in California.
Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED

Rural Counties Defy Governor’s Stay-At-Home Orders

Governor Gavin Newsom announced today that he’s given permission for more beaches in Orange County to reopen after reaching agreement with local officials. But the governor is unhappy with other counties that are defying state health orders.
Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED

Debt Collectors To Cash In On Coronavirus

A new study from the Pew Research Center predicts that debt collections will grow dramatically in the pandemic’s aftermath, and debt collectors are likely to sue to get other assets.
Reporter: Adhiti Bandlamudi, KQED

May 06 2020

8mins

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Rank #5: ‘Trailers for Nurses’ Helps Health Workers Isolate

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First Known Coronavirus Death Weeks Earlier Than Previously Thought
The first confirmed deaths from the novel coronavirus in the United States look like they took place in Santa Clara County, more than a month earlier than initially thought and reported.
Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED

PG&E’s CEO Steps Down
The CEO of embattled utility Pacific Gas and Electric is stepping down. The utility’s plan for leaving bankruptcy has been approved and will allow it to tap a state insurance fund in case of future fires.
Reporter: Lily Jamali, KQED

Governor Newsom Warns Against Re-opening State
Golf courses, beaches and parks are opening again as some California cities and counties begin to ease stay-at-home orders put in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus. But Governor Gavin says the number of positive tests, hospitalizations, and deaths have actually ticked up, not down.

New Poll Illuminates Coronavirus Concerns
With the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths still climbing, a new poll finds many Californians are very worried about their health, and their finances.
Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED

California EPA Fights Federal Regulatory Relaxation
This Earth Day, California’s Environmental Protection Agency is carrying an extra burden. In March, its federal counterpart said that it would stop enforcing most environmental regulations for an open-ended period of time.
Reporter: Craig Miller, KQED

Diary of a Bay Area Nurse
When hospital workers show up for work, they have to take extraordinary precautions to make sure they don’t spread the coronavirus inside hospitals. And those precautions don’t stop once they leave work and go home. Bay Area ER nurse Douglas Frey offers a snapshot of what he does after a shift at the hospital.
Producer: Leslie McClurg, KQED

‘Trailers for Nurses’ Helps Health Workers Isolate
Health care workers are exposed to the coronavirus more than anyone else. After their shift is over, many worry about passing the sickness onto their families. So they’ve had to find ways to isolate after work with some even pitching tents in their garages and backyards. Now, in Ventura County north of L.A., they’ve got another option.
Reporter: Kathryn Barnes, KCRW

Lewis MacAdams, advocate for LA River, Dies
Lewis MacAdams has died. A poet and environmentalist, for more than thirty years, MacAdams championed the restoration of the Los Angeles River through his art and activism by founding the group the Friends of the L.A. River.

Apr 22 2020

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Rank #6: Research: More Coronavirus Cases Than Previously Thought

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Research Shows More People Had Coronavirus Than Previously Thought

What if far more people are infected with coronavirus than previously thought? A preliminary study that tested more than 800 adults in L.A. County for COVID-19 antibodies suggests that’s the case. Those antibodies indicate someone’s been exposed to the virus.
Reporter: Robert Garrova, KPCC

Legislators Want More Oversight of Pandemic Spending

In a legislative hearing yesterday, members of both parties said they wanted more oversight over how Governor Newsom is responding to the pandemic, especially when it comes to how money is being spent, like a recent deal to buy millions of masks from China.
Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics 

60 Inmates in San Bernardino Prison Test Positive

prison Sixty inmates at a state prison in San Bernardino County have tested positive for COVID-19. And two men recently paroled from that facility have also tested positive for the virus, raising concerns about the virus spreading.
Reporter: Julie Small, KQED

City Officials Watch Dwindling Tax Revenues

As tax revenues dwindle because of the business shutdown, the state’s largest cities are getting financial help from the federal government through the CARES Act. But smaller cities, at least for now, are on their own. So what’s like to run a smaller city during the pandemic?
Guest: Peter Weiss, Mayor of Oceanside

Judge: ICE Should Release Detainees at High Risk of COVID-19

A federal judge in southern California has ordered Immigration and Customs Enforcement to consider releasing all detainees nationwide who are at high risk of contracting Covid-19.
Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED

Fewer Commuters, Fewer Crashes: Pandemic Driving

Chances are your commute, if you’re still commuting, is way better than it was before the pandemic. A new study out of UC Davis says less traffic means fewer crashes and that’s created big cost savings.
Reporter: Dan Brekke, KQED

Apr 21 2020

12mins

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Rank #7: Drive-By Protests and Outreach to Help Day Laborers

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State Assembly Heads Back to Work After Emergency Recess

State legislators are returning to Sacramento today after leaving for an emergency recess in March because of the coronavirus crisis.
Guest: Anthony Rendon, California Assembly Speaker

State’s First Election During Pandemic Heats Up North of LA

The first election during California’s COVID-19 crisis is next Tuesday. Voters north of Los Angeles in the Simi, Santa Clarita, and Antelope Valleys are casting ballots in a special election. They’ll decide who fills a Congressional seat left vacant by the resignation of freshmen Democrat Katie Hill last October.  The pandemic has re-framed the candidates’ messages—and reshaped how the election will take place.
Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED Politics

Drive-By Protests and Outreach to Help Day Laborers

Even under stay at home orders, most counties have allowed construction projects to continue, including home remodeling and landscaping. So day laborers have kept looking for the little work that remains. In Los Angeles, activists are reaching out to workers to tell them about programs that can help.
Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW

FaceBook Page Provides for Needs of Prisoners During Pandemic

Jails and prisons are hot spots when it comes to the spread of COVID-19. They’re also places where personal hygiene products to keep clean are in short supply. There’s a new online effort to help, one prisoner at a time.
Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED

May 04 2020

14mins

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