OwlTail

Cover image of Christina Snyder

Christina Snyder

13 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Christina Snyder, “Slavery After the Civil War: How Bondage Persisted in the US and its Territories”

Discovery & Inspiration

As commonly understood, slavery in the United States officially came to an end with the surrender of the Confederacy and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. Yet various forms of human bondage and forced labor continued across the United States and its territories long after the conclusion of the Civil War and into the twentieth century. In this podcast, historian Christina Snyder from The Pennsylvania State University discusses her work, examining why multiple forms of unfree labor and bondage persisted across the United States long after chattel slavery was abolished.https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/christina-snyder-slavery-after-civil-war-how-bondage-persisted/

23mins

22 May 2020

Episode artwork

Indigenous Enslavement: Part 2 – w/ Christina Snyder

Teaching Hard History

Understanding Indigenous enslavement expands our conception of slavery in what is now the United States. It spread across the entire continent and affected millions of people of different backgrounds. If we define slavery too narrowly, we can fail to see its persistence over time and even its modern-day permutations. Historian Christina Snyder examines the Civil War, Lincoln and emancipation with Indigenous people in mind. Resources and Readings Teaching Hard History, K-5 Framework: Essential Knowledge #18 Teaching Hard History, 6-12 Framework: Objective #8 Teaching Hard History, 6-12 Framework: Objective #16 National Museum of the American Indian, Native Knowledge 360° Minnesota Historical Society, Dakota War of 1862 Christina Snyder McCabe Greer Professor of History, Penn State University Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America Great Crossings; Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson References: Teaching Tolerance, The Underground Railroad U.S. Supreme Court, Worcester v. Georgia Smithsonian film, The “Indian Problem” Malinda Maynor Lowery, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle University of Minnesota, Holocaust and Genocide Studies Teaching Tolerance, Emancipation Proclamation Time, How a Court Answered a Forgotten Question of Slavery’s Legacy WNET, Slaughterhouse Cases (1873) Crooked Media podcast, This Land And you'll find a full episode transcript on our site.

1hr 6mins

20 Sep 2019

Similar People

Episode artwork

Indigenous Enslavement: Part 1 – w/ Christina Snyder

Teaching Hard History

Millions of Indigenous people lived in North America before European colonial powers invaded. Along with an insatiable desire for free labor, Europeans brought systems of slavery that significantly differed from the historical practices of enslavement among Native nations. Historian Christina Snyder explains what happened when these worlds collided. European concepts of bondage transformed the way Native nations interacted, resulted in the enslavement and death of millions and sparked widespread resistance. Resources and Resources Teaching Tolerance: Lesson, Rethinking Discovery Teaching Tolerance: I am the Blood of the Conqueror, I am the Blood of the Conquered Teaching Tolerance: Stowage on the Slave Ship Brooks, 1788 Wikipedia: Requerimiento: The Spanish Requirement of 1513 Christina Snyder McCabe Greer Professor of History, Penn State University Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America Great Crossings; Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson References: Teaching Tolerance: Lesson, Precolumbian Native Peoples and Technology Doctrine of Discovery Teaching Tolerance: The Atlantic Slave Trade what too few textbooks told you U.S. Supreme Court, Johnson V. M’Intosh Wikipedia: Requerimiento: The Spanish Requirement of 1513 Mapping the Mississippian Shatter Zone: The Colonial Indian Slave Trade and Regional Instability in the American South Sarah Shear, Social Studies & Multicultural Education, University of Washington-Bothell And you'll find a full episode transcript on our site.

1hr 24mins

6 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

Money Equals Emotions with Christina Snyder

Brave Girls with Tracy Imm

Today we meet with Christina Snyder, a trusted wealth management professional who advises others on all things money. She shares her perspectives on the energy of money and how emotions are intertwined with our money story and how she came to this realization at a very young age. Born and raised in Greece, Christina came to the US when she was fourteen to live with her dad. This experience shaped Christina in profound and dramatic ways. On her own since she was eighteen, she teaches all that she’s learned about money, financial empowerment and decision making when it comes to our finances. While she was reluctant to share her Brave Girl story for many years due to shame, she now openly shares it in hopes to touch others and teach them the lessons that she has learned. Christina talks about having the courage to make a change, having curiosity about what’s on the other side and the importance of choice. Christina encourages her clients to have good financial habits and to create a budget that tracks your cash flow. A true coach, she works with her clients to effectively plan for the future and provide for the needs of their families. We talk about generational difference in money perspectives as well as how to define and manage your risks. She also strongly advises to have a team of advisors on your financial journey. Christina also shares her perspectives on civic leadership and why you need to pay it forward. We also talk about the need to please and setting boundaries to make sure you don’t overcommit and can give your best. I think you’ll love all of the life advice that Christina dishes out on the episode and see why she’s someone that speaks from not only experience but directly from her heart.

38mins

11 Jun 2019

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Christina Snyder on Mental Wellness and Communication [071]

Boss Barista

"I realized I hadn't lived as myself for the last five years." Christina Snyder is a roaster for Deeper Roots Coffee in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in this interview, they talk about creating space for others, the constant code switching of customer service, and honoring one's boundaries and mental capacity. In this deeply personal episode, Christina answers some difficult questions about the self, taking care of your team, and the power of a simple check in.  If you're reading this, I encourage you to call, write, or text someone you love and ask them how they are. Proactively take care of your friends and loved ones if you're able.  Also check out these amazing new podcast covers from @erinannsalt. And thanks always to @goodbeerhunting for making this podcast possible. 

37mins

21 Feb 2019

Episode artwork

Christina Snyder, “Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in the American West

Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson (Oxford, 2017) is a dramatic and vibrant story of a little-known Kentucky school, the Choctaw Academy. Christina Snyder, McCabe-Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, argues that this short-lived institution represented both the promise of a multi-ethnic American society, as well as the withering of that dream during the era of Jacksonian Democracy and Indian Removal. Snyder presents several characters, including the Choctaw scion Peter Pitchlynn, the enslaved nurse and sometime-plantation overseer Julia Chinn, and her mate and master, Vice President Richard M. Johnson. Each person’s story (as well as several others) underscores the complicated hierarchies of race and class in antebellum America, as their histories intertwine with that of the Choctaw Academy and its students. Winner of the 2018 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians, Great Crossings is a richly told and thickly researched tale that upends simple narratives of pre-Civil War American society, Native nations, and enslaved people. In their place, Snyder tells of complex humans acting by turns graciously and selfishly, with cruelty and with kindness, as the diverse population of the antebellum American West fumbled its way into the modern era. Stephen Hausmann is a doctoral candidate at Temple University and Visiting Instructor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently writing his dissertation, a history of race and the environment in the Black Hills and surrounding northern plains region of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

57mins

18 Sep 2018

Episode artwork

Christina Snyder, “Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in African American Studies

Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson (Oxford, 2017) is a dramatic and vibrant story of a little-known Kentucky school, the Choctaw Academy. Christina Snyder, McCabe-Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, argues that this short-lived institution represented both the promise of a multi-ethnic American society, as well as the withering of that dream during the era of Jacksonian Democracy and Indian Removal. Snyder presents several characters, including the Choctaw scion Peter Pitchlynn, the enslaved nurse and sometime-plantation overseer Julia Chinn, and her mate and master, Vice President Richard M. Johnson. Each person’s story (as well as several others) underscores the complicated hierarchies of race and class in antebellum America, as their histories intertwine with that of the Choctaw Academy and its students. Winner of the 2018 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians, Great Crossings is a richly told and thickly researched tale that upends simple narratives of pre-Civil War American society, Native nations, and enslaved people. In their place, Snyder tells of complex humans acting by turns graciously and selfishly, with cruelty and with kindness, as the diverse population of the antebellum American West fumbled its way into the modern era. Stephen Hausmann is a doctoral candidate at Temple University and Visiting Instructor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently writing his dissertation, a history of race and the environment in the Black Hills and surrounding northern plains region of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

57mins

18 Sep 2018

Episode artwork

Christina Snyder, “Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson” (Oxford UP, 2017)

New Books in History

Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson (Oxford, 2017) is a dramatic and vibrant story of a little-known Kentucky school, the Choctaw Academy. Christina Snyder, McCabe-Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, argues that this short-lived institution represented both the promise of a multi-ethnic American society, as well as the withering of that dream during the era of Jacksonian Democracy and Indian Removal. Snyder presents several characters, including the Choctaw scion Peter Pitchlynn, the enslaved nurse and sometime-plantation overseer Julia Chinn, and her mate and master, Vice President Richard M. Johnson. Each person’s story (as well as several others) underscores the complicated hierarchies of race and class in antebellum America, as their histories intertwine with that of the Choctaw Academy and its students. Winner of the 2018 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians, Great Crossings is a richly told and thickly researched tale that upends simple narratives of pre-Civil War American society, Native nations, and enslaved people. In their place, Snyder tells of complex humans acting by turns graciously and selfishly, with cruelty and with kindness, as the diverse population of the antebellum American West fumbled its way into the modern era. Stephen Hausmann is a doctoral candidate at Temple University and Visiting Instructor of history at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently writing his dissertation, a history of race and the environment in the Black Hills and surrounding northern plains region of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

57mins

18 Sep 2018

Episode artwork

021 Indians, Settlers, and Slaves at Great Crossings with Christina Snyder

The Age of Jackson Podcast

In "Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson," prize-winning historian Christina Snyder reinterprets the history of Jacksonian America. Most often, this drama focuses on whites who turned west to conquer a continent, extending "liberty" as they went. Great Crossings also includes Native Americans from across the continent seeking new ways to assert anciently-held rights and people of African descent who challenged the United States to live up to its ideals. These diverse groups met in an experimental community in central Kentucky called Great Crossings, home to the first federal Indian school and a famous interracial family.Great Crossings embodied monumental changes then transforming North America. The United States, within the span of a few decades, grew from an East Coast nation to a continental empire. The territorial growth of the United States forged a multicultural, multiracial society, but that diversity also sparked fierce debates over race, citizenship, and America's destiny. Great Crossings, a place of race-mixing and cultural exchange, emerged as a battleground. Its history provides an intimate view of the ambitions and struggles of Indians, settlers, and slaves who were trying to secure their place in a changing world. Through deep research and compelling prose, Snyder introduces us to a diverse range of historical actors: Richard Mentor Johnson, the politician who reportedly killed Tecumseh and then became schoolmaster to the sons of his former foes; Julia Chinn, Johnson's enslaved concubine, who fought for her children's freedom; and Peter Pitchlynn, a Choctaw intellectual who, even in the darkest days of Indian removal, argued for the future of Indian nations. Together, their stories demonstrate how this era transformed colonizers and the colonized alike, sowing the seeds of modern America.Christina Snyder is the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2007. Her first book, Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America, earned a wide range of accolades, including the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize, the James H. Broussard Prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, and the John C. Ewers Prize from the Western History Association. Her latest work is Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson.Song Credit: Tommy Case's The Great Crossing Waltz.

54mins

18 May 2018

Episode artwork

HPH098 : An Off-Grid, Earth-Sheltered Passivhaus - with Christina Snyder

House Planning Help Podcast

Architect, builder and Passivhaus Consultant, Christina Snyder shares the story of the experimental zero-energy Passivhaus self-build that she and her husband have undertaken in Michigan, and explains why they are in no rush to complete it.

24mins

9 Sep 2015

Loading