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6 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Kathryn Edin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Kathryn Edin, often where they are interviewed.

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6 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Kathryn Edin. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Kathryn Edin, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Rural Poverty with Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer

Rural Matters
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This episode is the first of our timely four-part series on rural poverty and issues impacting the 2020 elections presented this month in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Michelle chats with Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer of the University of Michigan’s Poverty Solutions, an interdisciplinary initiative that seeks to partner communities and policymakers to find new ways to prevent and alleviate poverty.  Edin and Shaefer are authors of the landmark book, $2 a Day: The Art of Living on Virtually Nothing in America, which was listed as one of The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2015. Edin, one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, describes how stunning it was to take a deep dive into interviewing entire rural communities to find out more about the social determinants of persistent poverty. Edin notes that, in several disadvantaged counties, including those in Marion County, South Carolina and LeFlore County, Mississippi, were comprised of a majority black population whose institutions are controlled by the minority white population. In those counties, she notes, there is virtually no institutional sharing, which perpetuates segregation. In addition, Edin says, in another county, she heard a consistent refrain from local residents:  “There’s nothing to do here except drug.”  Shaefer, Hermann and Amalie Kohn Professor of Social Justice and Social Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and a Professor of Social Work at the University of Michigan, says that, for persistent poverty to be prevented and alleviated, we need to address inequitable situations in which emergency relief administered after natural disasters disarmingly favor those who have clear title to property, which is an integral, historical component of persistent poverty. Shaefer also describes how Poverty Solutions is bringing students into meaningful conversations about poverty through university courses and events and, most notably, through embedding them in communities of deep disadvantage to gain a real world perspective on this issue.  This episode is sponsored by Community Hospital Corporation, www.communityhspitalcorp.com; Rural Medical Education Collaborative. ruralhealthcme.com; and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, www.rwjf.org.

Jun 10 2020

44mins

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The End of Welfare: Kathryn Edin (Rebroadcast)

Future Hindsight
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The end of welfare

Welfare ceased being guaranteed after reform in 1996. Although the safety net for the working class was strengthened through tax credits, the safety net for those who are jobless disappeared. In its current state, the welfare system is overwhelming and underfunded. States are given block grants that they can spend at their discretion. For example, Louisiana spends its money on anti-abortion clinics. As a result, over the course of a year, about 3.5 million children live in households with virtually no cash income for at least 3 months.

Cash is king

Cash has the ultimate function: it can be used to pay rent, utilities, food, school supplies, and more. Although food stamps (SNAP) and Medicaid help needy families, these cashless forms of assistance cannot address other necessities in life. Access to cash can be pivotal to keeping a job – to fill your car with gas so you can go to work – or a roof over your head while you look for a new job after being downsized.

The poor are true Americans

America’s poor are the very embodiment of American ideals. Living in poverty is incredibly complex, a daily challenge to which the poor rise. They take pride in their work and find purpose at the workplace. They are hard-working, resourceful, and enterprising. Poor families spend their money wisely to keep their children fed and sheltered, and they stretch every dollar to make ends meet.

Find out more:

Kathryn Edin is one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, working in the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family, life, and neighborhood contexts through direct, in-depth observations of the lives of low-income populations. A qualitative and mixed-method researcher, she has taken on key mysteries about the urban poor that have not been fully answered by quantitative work, such as how do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work?

She has authored 8 books and some 60 journal articles. $2 a Day: The Art of Living on Virtutally Nothing in America, co-authored with Luke Shaefer, was met with wide critical acclaim. It was included in the NYT 100 Notable Books of 2015, cited as “essential reporting about the rise in destitute families.”

You can follow Kathryn on Twitter @KathrynEdin

Jan 31 2020

27mins

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S4E10: Living on $2 a Day (w/ Kathryn Edin)

Bad With Money With Gaby Dunn
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Could you get by in the USA on $2 a day? Millions of people in the US are living that reality today. Gaby talks with Princeton University poverty researcher Kathryn Edin, co-author of $2 a Day: The Art of Living on Virtually Nothing in America. They discuss the end of cash welfare, debunking poverty myths, and what people are doing to survive.


This episode is sponsored by 

Care/Of. For 25% off your first Care/of order, go to TakeCareOf.com and enter promo code MONEY

Jun 26 2019

47mins

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Kathryn Edin

Future Hindsight
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The end of welfare

Welfare ceased being guaranteed after reform in 1996. Although the safety net for the working class was strengthened through tax credits, the safety net for those who are jobless disappeared. In its current state, the welfare system is overwhelming and underfunded. States are given block grants that they can spend at their discretion. For example, Louisiana spends its money on anti-abortion clinics. As a result, over the course of a year, about 3.5 million children live in households with virtually no cash income for at least 3 months.

Cash is king

Cash has the ultimate function: it can be used to pay rent, utilities, food, school supplies, and more. Although food stamps (SNAP) and Medicaid help needy families, these cashless forms of assistance cannot address other necessities in life. Access to cash can be pivotal to keeping a job – to fill your car with gas so you can go to work – or a roof over your head while you look for a new job after being downsized.

The poor are true Americans

America’s poor are the very embodiment of American ideals. Living in poverty is incredibly complex, a daily challenge to which the poor rise. They take pride in their work and find purpose at the workplace. They are hard-working, resourceful, and enterprising. Poor families spend their money wisely to keep their children fed and sheltered, and they stretch every dollar to make ends meet.

Find out more: Kathryn Edin is one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, working in the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family, life, and neighborhood contexts through direct, in-depth observations of the lives of low-income populations. A qualitative and mixed-method researcher, she has taken on key mysteries about the urban poor that have not been fully answered by quantitative work, such as how do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work?

She has authored 8 books and some 60 journal articles. $2 a Day: The Art of Living on Virtutally Nothing in America, co-authored with Luke Shaefer, was met with wide critical acclaim. It was included in the NYT 100 Notable Books of 2015, cited as “essential reporting about the rise in destitute families.”

Apr 06 2019

27mins

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Renee's guest is Kathryn Edin, a sociologist and a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University. She specializes in study of people living on welfare. Edin is author of $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

Feb 03 2017

28mins

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Kathryn Edin on "Fragile Fatherhood:What Being a Daddy Means in the Lives of Low-Income Men," 2009-01-14

Major Speakers - Audio
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Jan 22 2009

1hr 30mins

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