OwlTail

Cover image of Judith Campisi

Judith Campisi

4 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Dr. Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute Discusses Cell Senescence, Aging, and Quality of Life

FutureTech Podcast

She explains how chronic inflammation is a double-edged sword and that research has uncovered surprising results on mice and how cell senescence impacts their existence. Studies have found that exercise and diet may benefit cell senescence in mice; it’s thought provoking even as the process is not fully understood. Finally, she gives a prediction on the expected lifespan of humans two or three decades from now. Is it even possible to increase it? And if so, how? Dr. Campisi also discusses: Why humans are impacted by cell senescence now more than ever in our history The two parts of the immune system – the innate and adaptive subsystems – and their roles in aging The effect of the FDA’s refusal to classify aging as a disease Which type of diet has shown the most promise in blunting the effects of cell senescence The impact of personality on brain activity – and the overall effect on health and cell senescence

33mins

19 Oct 2018

Episode artwork

#025 - How to Clear Senescent Cells to Stay Healthier as we Age - Judith Campisi, PhD

humanOS Radio

Why is that we tend to see many diseases of aging occur around the same time in life? One reason is that we accumulate senescent cells with age, and these cells promote the aging process. There is, however, exciting new research that shows how these cells can be cleared as we age. Some of the compounds are drugs but others are natural compounds that could have a meaningful effect.In this episode, Dan speaks with an expert on the subject: Judith Campisi, Ph.D., from the Buck Institute of Aging in Marin County, California.

24mins

1 Aug 2017

Similar People

Episode artwork

Dr. Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute Discusses Cell Senescence, Aging, and Quality of Life

Finding Genius Podcast

Why and how do mice age differently from elephants? Why do humans age differently from both? What is the limit of human longevity and can it be increased? If so, how? To renowned biogerontology professor and scientist Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, finding answers to these questions drives her. Each age-related disease is due to cell senescence, a cell’s response to stress, yet there’s also what she calls the “evolutionary trade-off” of cell senescence. She explains how chronic inflammation is a double-edged sword and that research has uncovered surprising results on mice and how cell senescence impacts their existence. Studies have found that exercise and diet may benefit cell senescence in mice; it’s thought provoking even as the process is not fully understood. Finally, she gives a prediction on the expected lifespan of humans two or three decades from now. Is it even possible to increase it? And if so, how? Dr. Campisi also discusses: * Why humans are impacted by cell senescence now more than ever in our history * The two parts of the immune system – the innate and adaptive subsystems – and their roles in aging * The effect of the FDA’s refusal to classify aging as a disease * Which type of diet has shown the most promise in blunting the effects of cell senescence * The impact of personality on brain activity – and the overall effect on health and cell senescence

33mins

12 Jul 2017

Episode artwork

Judith Campisi, Ph.D. on Cellular Senescence, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Cancer & Aging

FoundMyFitness

Dr. Judith Campisi is a professor of biogerentology at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and a co-editor in chief of the Aging Journal. As an expert on cellular senescence, the discussion involves a lot of talk about aging and cancer, where senescence plays a very important fundamental role. What are some of the strategies we might use in the future to prevent senescent cells? What causes them in the first place? In this 1-hour long conversation, we discuss a great number of very interesting things including: Why diseases of aging, despite occurring in vary diverse tissue types, all begin to crop up simultaneously after 50 or 60 years of life. What the fundamental molecular processes of aging are and what some of the on-going research and general thoughts are surrounding these processes. What senescence is and the evolutionary biology explanation for why we have the mechanism of cellular senescence in the first place. The infiltration of immune cells into our tissues that occurs as a function of aging and the role of damaged or senescent cells in attracting these immune cells. The changes in gut permeability that happens with age and how that may increase our susceptibility to chronic, low-level inflammation. The role of senescent cells in cancer metastasis and progression. The clearance of senescent cells as a valid life extension strategy. How mitochondrial dysfunction, even in the absence of DNA damage, can cause cells to undergo senescence. The interesting observation that senescence from damage versus energy crisis (failed mitochondria) demonstrates a different and unique phenotype of cellular senescence. The effects prolonged fasting may have on the clearance of senescent cells. How periodic prolonged fasts might mimic some of the effects associated with an mTOR dampening drug like rapamycin. How the secretions of senescent cells can affect the regenerative capacity of stem cells. The practicality of a consumer available clinical assays for DNA damage and the challenge of assessing tissue-specific senescence without the use of invasive biopsy. The effect of so-called fasting mimetic compounds (e.g. hydroxycitrate, resveratrol & spermidine) on senescent cells. And believe it or not much more! Studies mentioned: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 Learn more about Dr. Judy Campisi. Did you enjoy this podcast? It was brought to you by people like you! Click here to visit our crowdsponsor page where you can learn more about how you can support the podcast for as little or as much as you like.

1hr 8mins

28 Apr 2017

Most Popular