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Barbara Freese

12 Podcast Episodes

Latest 25 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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76. She Exposes the Biggest Lies In Modern History | Barbara Freese

Growth Minds

From the treatment of slaves to drinking radium for health benefits, our modern history reveals a lot about the lies we've been told as a society by governments, nations, and corporations. Environmental attorney, Barbara Freese, studied 8 of the biggest lies that we have been told in just the past century that may shock you. Her focus is on eight shocking stories, including: The alternate reality of slave treatment by the English How we were fooled by corporations to drink Radium (and the tragic deaths that followed) Carmakers refuting to put seatbelts for decades Denial of the impacts of coal in climate change The lies that the tobacco industry has told for years and much more Hope you enjoy Learn more about Barbara: https://www.barbarafreese.com

1hr 10mins

17 Mar 2021

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Tom O'Connell and Barbara Freese discuss her book "Industrial Strength Denial," 11/30/20

East Side Freedom Library

The East Side Freedom Library invites you to the next conversation in  our series “Learning From the Past, Fighting for the Future”: A  Conversation between Tom O’Connell and Barbara Freese.   Join host Tom O’Connell as he interviews environmental attorney Barbara  Freese about her new book, "Industrial-Strength Denial: Eight Stories of  Corporations Defending the Indefensible." This new and timely book  takes the reader through eight campaigns of corporate denial from the  slave trade to radium consumption; financial manipulation to climate  change. In a general election campaign in which corporate abuses too  often go unchallenged, Freese’s powerful stories equip citizens with the  understanding we need to hold corporations accountable in the future.   Barbara is also the author of "Coal: A Human History," selected as a New  York Times Notable Book and recently released in an updated edition.  This critically-acclaimed book tells the story of how coal has  transformed the world over the centuries, describes the drama swirling  around coal use today, and explains why coal represents such a profound  threat to the global climate.  Barbara is an environmental attorney, policy analyst and speaker who has  for several years been deeply involved in energy and climate issues,  with a particular focus on coal. She has fought to block the  construction of new coal plants and to enact climate protection laws at  the state and federal level, and she co-authored multiple reports on  coal use when she was a senior policy advocate on the staff of the Union  of Concerned Scientists. In the mid-1990s, when she was an Assistant  Attorney General for the State of Minnesota, Barbara litigated the  science of climate change against the coal industry, confronting  first-hand the science denial that would later become so prominent in  the U.S. View the video: https://youtu.be/pbbHou0I3_U

47mins

31 Jan 2021

Similar People

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Barbara Freese on Corporate Denial

Democracy Paradox

Democratic values are about more than politics. They permeate throughout society and into the economy. Barbara Freese has examined how corporate leaders have not lived up to these values. She offers examples like the tobacco industry, the use of lead in gasoline, and global warming to demonstrate how they have avoided not just accountability but any sense of responsibility for behavior with catastrophic consequences. Barbara calls this phenomenon corporate denial and explains, “We should study corporate denial because corporations dominate our economy and shape our democracy, and for a huge proportion of Americans, corporate incentives, pressures, norms, and culture govern our work lives.” This is really a conversation about citizenship. We work hard to compartmentalize different parts of our life. Our behavior at work is not supposed to impact our neighbors or our community, but it can and often does. Ultimately, corporate denials do not come from corporations. They come from people viewed as leaders. And they erode the trust necessary for democratic governance. But we can restore that trust through honesty. Honesty with each other and honesty with ourselves. Barbara Freese is the author of Industrial Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible from the Slave Trade to Climate Change. She is an environmental attorney and a former Minnesota assistant attorney general. Her interest in corporate denial was sparked by cross-examining coal industry witnesses disputing the science of climate change. She lives in St. Paul.Thanks to Apes of the State for permission to use their tracks "The Internet Song" and "Bill Collector's Theme Song." You can find their music on Spotify or their Bandcamp. Please visit my blog at www.democracyparadox.com. I have written 70 reviews of both classic and contemporary works of political science with an emphasis on democracy. This week I reviewed The Concept of the Political by Carl Schmitt. Please visit the website and read my book reviews. And don't forget to subscribe to keep up with future episodes.

52mins

28 Oct 2020

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198 LIVE Open with StandUp Community, Barbara Freese and Maura Quint

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

The first segment was taped on zoom with 40 listener/subscribers joining the conversation about Trumps Taxes, Debate Speculation and Brad Parscale arrest 48:46 Barbara Freese is an environmental attorney and writer, with a particular focus on climate change, energy policy, and corporate social responsibility. She is a former Minnesota assistant attorney general and a former senior policy analyst for the Union of Concerned Scientists, and she has represented various environmental and clean energy nonprofit groups working to protect the climate. Her first book, Coal: A Human History, is a New York Times Notable Book. Her latest book is Industrial-Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible, from the Slave Trade to Climate Change. She lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. 1:33:49 Maura Quint is the a humor writer whose work has been featured in publications such as McSweeneys and The New Yorker. She was named one of Rolling Stone’s top 25 funniest twitter accounts of 2016. When not writing comedy, Maura has worked extensively with non-profits in diverse sectors including political action campaigns, international arts collectives and health and human services organizations. She has never been officially paid to protest but did once find fifteen cents on the ground at an immigrants’ rights rally and wanted to make sure that had been disclosed. She the executive director of TaxMarch.org Please consider a paid subscription to this daily podcast. Everyday I will interview 2 or more expert guests on a wide range of issues. I will continue to be transparent about my life, issues and vulnerabilities in hopes we can relate, connect and grow together. If you want to add something to the show email me StandUpwithPete@gmail.com Join the Stand Up Community How To Vote In The 2020 Election In Every State. Everything you need to know about mail-in and early in-person voting in every state in the age of COVID-19, including the first day you can cast your ballot in the 2020 election. (FiveThirtyEight / NBC News / Wall Street Journal)* *Aggregated by What The Fuck Just Happened Today? Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page PLEASE SIGN UP FOR A PAID SUBSCRIPTION 

1hr 59mins

29 Sep 2020

Most Popular

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Energy: Corporate Denial Campaigns with Barbara Freese

Industry Focus

For generations, businesses faced with evidence that their products cause harm to consumers have used public relations campaigns to deny culpability. This week’s guest is Barbara Freese, author of the recent book Industrial Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible, From the Slave Trade to Climate Change. Our conversation delves into corporate denial campaigns in the British slave trade, the fossil fuel industry, the tobacco industry, and more, as well as what changes we can make to make corporate denial less likely. Stocks Mentioned: XOM, BP, GM, F Check out more of our content here: StockUp, The Motley Fool's weekly email newsletter Podcasts Youtube Twitter Reach us by Email @ IndustryFocus@fool.com

42mins

3 Sep 2020

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Barbara Freese on Denial - how large companies undermine social trust in Science & Democracy

The Human Risk Podcast

On this episode, I explore the concept of denial; something we know is bad on an individual level. But what happens when denial takes place on an industrial scale? That's literally what my guest on this episode Barbara Freese, explores in her new book Industrial Strength Denial.Barbara is an environmental attorney who explores some high profile cases of where corporations have done things that are harmful. Yet faced with proof that they are hurting people or the planet, they deny evidence, blame the victims, complain of witch hunts, attack their critics’ motives, and otherwise rationalize their harmful activities. Denial campaigns have let corporations continue dangerous practices that cause widespread suffering, death, and environmental destruction. And, as Barbara goes on to explore, the fact that they undermine social trust in science and government, means that corporate denial has made it harder for our democracy to function.During our discussion we explore some fo the stories Barbara has researched and written about and look at some of the underlying dynamics; what drives these organisations to denial and what can we do to solve the problem?You can find out more about Barbara's book here: https://www.barbarafreese.com/industrialstrength-denial

1hr

26 Aug 2020

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Episode 33. Industrial Denial: Barbara Freese

Science History Podcast

Why is it that decades after scientists discover problems of paramount importance, such as global climate change or lead pollution, those problems still persist? Why do corporations get away with producing products that harm human health or the environment? How do corporations shape our society, our politics, and even our psychology? With us to untangle these questions is my guest, Barbara Freese. Barbara is an author, energy policy advocate, and environmental attorney.  After earning a law degree from New York University in 1986 she returned to her home state of Minnesota and spent a dozen years enforcing the state’s environmental laws as an Assistant Attorney General. In the mid-1990s, she litigated the science of climate change against the coal industry. She became so interested in coal’s larger impact on the world that she dug deeper into the issue, and in 2003 published the book, Coal: A Human History. An updated edition of Coal was published by Basic Books in 2016. After writing Coal, she spent years working with and for nonprofit groups, particularly the Union of Concerned Scientists, where she was a senior policy advocate. Her work focused on pushing for state and national policies to protect the climate, on stopping the construction of new coal plants, and on closing old coal plants. The subject of today’s episode is Barbara’s latest book, Industrial-Strength Denial, published this year by the University of California Press. 

1hr 9mins

11 Aug 2020

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#1500 - Barbara Freese

The Joe Rogan Experience

Barbara Freese is an author, environmental attorney and a former Minnesota assistant attorney general. Her latest book Industrial-Strength Denial is now available: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520296282/industrial-strength-denial

1hr 58mins

1 Jul 2020

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Good Law | Bad Law - When Corporations Lie: A Conversation w/ Barbara Freese

Good Law | Bad Law

Do corporations lie to avoid being held liable for harms their products or practices cause?  Of course they do. Aaron Freiwald, Managing Partner of Freiwald Law and host of the weekly podcast, Good Law | Bad Law, is joined by Barbara Freese, an author and an attorney, to talk about corporate denial and to discuss her new book, Industrial-Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible, from the Slave Trade to Climate Change. Faced with claims that they are hurting people or the planet, corporations have a long history of denying evidence, blaming victims, complaining of witch hunts, attacking their critics’ motives, and otherwise rationalizing their harmful activities. In today’s conversation, Aaron and Barbara tackle corporate denial, exploring the reasons why and how this can happen, as it has throughout our history.  Exploring eight case studies, from the British slave trade in the late 1700s through the climate change debate raging now, Barbara looks for reasons why corporations deny, deceive and, at times, outright lie.  Factors include tribalism, human nature, morality and social responsibility, power, economic inequality, social media, and more. Barbara argues that corporate denial campaigns have led to dangerous practices that cause widespread suffering, death, and environmental destruction. What can be done to combat corporate denial? Barbara and Aaron explore the social responsibility of corporations, examining the impact of our fractured media society, corporate and market cultures, curated confusion and manufactured doubt, as well as corporations and democracy. With a new generation of young activists rising up to protest companies involved in causing climate change and structural causes of racial and wealth inequality, there is hope for pressing for political and legal changes that will reduce the power and influence of corporations that engage in deceit and denial. Barbara Freese is an environmental attorney, an energy policy analyst, and a former Minnesota assistant attorney general. She is also the author of Coal: A Human History, a New York Times Notable Book. Barbara’s interest in corporate denial was sparked by cross-examining coal industry witnesses disputing the science of climate change. Listen now to find out more! To learn more about Barbara, please visit her website here. To learn more about Barbara’s latest book, Industrial-Strength Denial: Eight Stories of Corporations Defending the Indefensible, from the Slave Trade to Climate Change, please click here. Host: Aaron Freiwald Guest: Barbara Freese Follow Good Law | Bad Law YouTube: Good Law | Bad Law Facebook: @GOODLAWBADLAW Instagram: @GoodLawBadLaw Website: https://www.law-podcast.com

49mins

26 Jun 2020

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Barbara Freese: On Corporate Denial in the Age of the Pandemic

Keen On

Barbara Freese is the author of Coal: A Human History, a New York Times Notable Book. She is an environmental attorney and a former Minnesota assistant attorney general. Her interest in corporate denial was sparked by cross-examining coal industry witnesses disputing the science of climate change. She lives in St. Paul. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

24mins

1 Jun 2020

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