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Gregory Snyder

13 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Nov 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Ep. 9: Young, Scrappy, and Hungry with Gregory Snyder, P.K. Owusu-Acheaw, and Neal Karkhanis

Center Maryland Presents: The Lobby

Session is over and we've heard from some of the most storied names in Annapolis. On episode 9 of The Lobby, Damian brings together the next generation of Annapolis operatives.  We are joined today by Gregory Snyder of Bellamy Genn, P.K. Owusu-Acheaw of the Maryland State Education Association, and Neal Karkhanis of Funk  & Bolton. Join us for a far-reaching conversation about what led them to where they are, the changing face of lobbying and the tools of the future, and the realities of networking in the era of COVID-19.We hope to see you soon in the Lobby.

51mins

13 Apr 2021

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Audio dharma by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2021/03/20)

Brooklyn Zen Center Audio Dharma Podcast

Zen’s focus on posture is very helpful and very wise. Because it is getting to something we don’t know how to get to on our own. Until we sit down and take a shape we are not accustomed to, we will always take the shapes we are accustomed to. And as long as we take … Audio dharma by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2021/03/20) Read More »

20 Mar 2021

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Audio dharma by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2021/03/19)

Brooklyn Zen Center Audio Dharma Podcast

Wisdom is nowhere other than in intimate relationship to what is happening.

19 Mar 2021

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Audio dharma talk by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2020/10/03)

Brooklyn Zen Center Audio Dharma Podcast

Sometimes that Buddha ancestral connection is represented between a teacher and a student – which Dogen talks a lot about – but it can be represented by our relationship to the Buddhas and ancestors we don’t see right in front of us, that we know came before us. And so we speak to them about … Audio dharma talk by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2020/10/03) Read More »

3 Oct 2020

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Audio dharma by Kosen Gregory Snyder (2020/09/19)

Brooklyn Zen Center Audio Dharma Podcast

It starts to become really clear that […] responding to the difficulties of our lives often requires the energy of others. That being with others, our daily routine that we take for granted, is often the way we gather the strength and energy to meet our lives.

19 Sep 2020

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Gregory Snyder, “Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding” (NYU Press, 2017)

New Books in Anthropology

Today we are joined by Gregory Snyder, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY), and author of Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding (New York University Press, 2017).  In Skateboarding LA, Snyder explores the world of professional street skateboarding in order to explain how the skate subculture produce a rich urban community and significant profits for professional skaters in spite of the widespread illegality of the sport.Based on almost a decade of ethnographic interviews with skateboarders, videographers, and promoters, Snyder de-centers notions of skateboarders as criminals and vandals. Instead he describes skaters as creative forces in the city: impromptu repair crews, street architects, amateur historians, urban explorers, and public space activists.  He shows how skaters see public spaces differently: stairs, benches, handrails, and fountains become potential obstacles for tricks.  They produce their own language to describe new maneuvers and produce the history of these unique sports spaces online in videos and in magazines.  And when those spaces are threatened, skateboarders organize publicly to save them as they did in the case of the West LA Library.You do not need to be interested in extreme or lifestyle sports to enjoy Snyder’s work because his larger conclusions concern the abilities of subcultures to preserve and grow in spite of public opprobrium.  Anthropologists and ethnographers in the Birmingham School studied the way subcultures used pastiches of styles as a form of symbolic resistance to “win space.”  Previous histories of skateboarding adopted this theoretical model to investigate skateboarders as a resistance subculture.  Snyder rejects this view because it paints subcultural groups as ultimately futile, destined to become commodified by outside forces.  Snyder shows how the commodification of street skateboarding occurred largely on its own terms and generally through the efforts of professional and former professional skateboarders working in subcultural careers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

1hr 2mins

14 May 2018

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Gregory Snyder, “Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding” (NYU Press, 2017)

New Books in Sports

Today we are joined by Gregory Snyder, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY), and author of Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding (New York University Press, 2017).  In Skateboarding LA, Snyder explores the world of professional street skateboarding in order to explain... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

1hr 2mins

14 May 2018

Episode artwork

Gregory Snyder, “Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding” (NYU Press, 2017)

New Books in Popular Culture

Today we are joined by Gregory Snyder, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY), and author of Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding (New York University Press, 2017).  In Skateboarding LA, Snyder explores the world of professional street skateboarding in order to explain how the skate subculture produce a rich urban community and significant profits for professional skaters in spite of the widespread illegality of the sport.Based on almost a decade of ethnographic interviews with skateboarders, videographers, and promoters, Snyder de-centers notions of skateboarders as criminals and vandals. Instead he describes skaters as creative forces in the city: impromptu repair crews, street architects, amateur historians, urban explorers, and public space activists.  He shows how skaters see public spaces differently: stairs, benches, handrails, and fountains become potential obstacles for tricks.  They produce their own language to describe new maneuvers and produce the history of these unique sports spaces online in videos and in magazines.  And when those spaces are threatened, skateboarders organize publicly to save them as they did in the case of the West LA Library.You do not need to be interested in extreme or lifestyle sports to enjoy Snyder’s work because his larger conclusions concern the abilities of subcultures to preserve and grow in spite of public opprobrium.  Anthropologists and ethnographers in the Birmingham School studied the way subcultures used pastiches of styles as a form of symbolic resistance to “win space.”  Previous histories of skateboarding adopted this theoretical model to investigate skateboarders as a resistance subculture.  Snyder rejects this view because it paints subcultural groups as ultimately futile, destined to become commodified by outside forces.  Snyder shows how the commodification of street skateboarding occurred largely on its own terms and generally through the efforts of professional and former professional skateboarders working in subcultural careers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

1hr 2mins

14 May 2018

Episode artwork

Gregory Snyder, “Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding” (NYU Press, 2017)

New Books in American Studies

Today we are joined by Gregory Snyder, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY), and author of Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding (New York University Press, 2017).  In Skateboarding LA, Snyder explores the world of professional street skateboarding in order to explain how the skate subculture produce a rich urban community and significant profits for professional skaters in spite of the widespread illegality of the sport.Based on almost a decade of ethnographic interviews with skateboarders, videographers, and promoters, Snyder de-centers notions of skateboarders as criminals and vandals. Instead he describes skaters as creative forces in the city: impromptu repair crews, street architects, amateur historians, urban explorers, and public space activists.  He shows how skaters see public spaces differently: stairs, benches, handrails, and fountains become potential obstacles for tricks.  They produce their own language to describe new maneuvers and produce the history of these unique sports spaces online in videos and in magazines.  And when those spaces are threatened, skateboarders organize publicly to save them as they did in the case of the West LA Library.You do not need to be interested in extreme or lifestyle sports to enjoy Snyder’s work because his larger conclusions concern the abilities of subcultures to preserve and grow in spite of public opprobrium.  Anthropologists and ethnographers in the Birmingham School studied the way subcultures used pastiches of styles as a form of symbolic resistance to “win space.”  Previous histories of skateboarding adopted this theoretical model to investigate skateboarders as a resistance subculture.  Snyder rejects this view because it paints subcultural groups as ultimately futile, destined to become commodified by outside forces.  Snyder shows how the commodification of street skateboarding occurred largely on its own terms and generally through the efforts of professional and former professional skateboarders working in subcultural careers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 2mins

14 May 2018

Episode artwork

Gregory Snyder, “Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding” (NYU Press, 2017)

New Books in Sociology

Today we are joined by Gregory Snyder, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York (CUNY), and author of Skateboarding LA: Inside Professional Street Skateboarding (New York University Press, 2017).  In Skateboarding LA, Snyder explores the world of professional street skateboarding in order to explain how the skate subculture produce a rich urban community and significant profits for professional skaters in spite of the widespread illegality of the sport.Based on almost a decade of ethnographic interviews with skateboarders, videographers, and promoters, Snyder de-centers notions of skateboarders as criminals and vandals. Instead he describes skaters as creative forces in the city: impromptu repair crews, street architects, amateur historians, urban explorers, and public space activists.  He shows how skaters see public spaces differently: stairs, benches, handrails, and fountains become potential obstacles for tricks.  They produce their own language to describe new maneuvers and produce the history of these unique sports spaces online in videos and in magazines.  And when those spaces are threatened, skateboarders organize publicly to save them as they did in the case of the West LA Library.You do not need to be interested in extreme or lifestyle sports to enjoy Snyder’s work because his larger conclusions concern the abilities of subcultures to preserve and grow in spite of public opprobrium.  Anthropologists and ethnographers in the Birmingham School studied the way subcultures used pastiches of styles as a form of symbolic resistance to “win space.”  Previous histories of skateboarding adopted this theoretical model to investigate skateboarders as a resistance subculture.  Snyder rejects this view because it paints subcultural groups as ultimately futile, destined to become commodified by outside forces.  Snyder shows how the commodification of street skateboarding occurred largely on its own terms and generally through the efforts of professional and former professional skateboarders working in subcultural careers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

1hr 2mins

14 May 2018

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