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Agnes Pelton

6 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Jun 2022 | Updated Daily

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Ep 24: Agnes Pelton's Silver Baby & the Benefits of Working Slow

Pep Talks for Artists

This episode I look at the plusses of slowing down and taking our own sweet time in the studio. Artist slow-poke examples include Giorgio Morandi (read by Frank Bango), Jay Defeo, Charles Burchfield's "reconstructions" like "Sun and Rocks," Michelangelo, Cy Twombly, and, last but not least: Agnes Pelton and her silver baby. I didn't hold back on the crazy effects on this one, guys...it's a full vibe.  Agnes Pelton readings were from:  "Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist" ed. by Gilbert Vicario  Thanks for listening!  Connect with Peps on Instagram and see more images illustrating this episode: @peptalksforartists Amy's website: https://www.amytalluto.com/ Many thanks to Frank Bango at Sincere Recording Studio for his help in producing and mixing this episode!--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/peptalksforartistspod/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peptalksforartistspod/support

11mins

5 May 2022

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FRANKIE BONUS: Agnes Pelton - Future 1943 (Ep. 20) & Hilma af Klint (Ep. 14) Bloopers and Cutscenes

Art Slice - A Palatable Serving of Art History

This week, Stephanie and Russell present a BONUS serving of Art History in honor of their beloved cat who passed away suddenly this past week, Frankie. ❀ 𝓕𝓻𝓪𝓷𝓴𝓲𝓮 𝟤𝟢𝟣𝟣 - 𝟤𝟢𝟤𝟤 ❀Full episode out next week!This BONUS serving is of Agnes Pelton’s Future painting from 1943 from episode 20 and a set of bloopers and cutscenes from Hilma af Klint episode 14.Hug your animal friends and human friends extra tight tonight and enjoy this Patreon content courtesy of Frankie. Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

16mins

29 Mar 2022

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20: Agnes Pelton - Incandescent Visions

Art Slice - A Palatable Serving of Art History

Stephanie and Russell are back to take you to the California desert, where they discuss the life and work of Agnes Pelton, a theosophical and occult painter of the 20th century who was relatively unknown in the Art World Mainstream until recently.For all the clips we cut from this and other episodes, including us covering another Agnes Pelton work - Future, 1943 - head on over to our Patreon https://www.patreon.com/artslicepodDespite similarities to Hilma af Klint and Wassily Kandinsky (both inspired by Theosophy) in terms of abstraction and often compared to painter Georgia O’ Keefe with her desert landscapes – Agnes’ work is truly unique, combining theosophical symbology with a keen eye to light filled observations resulting in otherworldly and incandescent compositions. Using oil paint and numerous layers of glazes, she achieves that mesmerizing glowing light effect present in paintings of Italian Baroque masters like Artemisia Gentileschi and (Michelangelo Merisi da) Caravaggio.After leaving behind the bustling East Coast, Agnes sought a life in Cathedral City, located in the California desert, where she could channel her energy and focus on harnessing the incandescent visions that came to her through her meditations while also exploring her spirituality.There, she found a community of like-minded outsiders and artists who thrived in the oasis that was Cathedral City for them too. Despite her lack of mainstream success for the most part during her life, she made a lasting impression on those who knew her – whether it was through her presence or through her stunning paintings.Topics include sugar addiction problems, dirty windshields, studious rattlesnakes, silver tea sets, and cliffside thrift stores.The works discussed today are Sandstorm, 1932; Orbits. 1934; and The Blest. 1941.The featured music today is "Doug and Mike Starn" by Rob Lynch & Jonathan Hughes from the album Public / PrivatePick up our new Art Slice Museum Shirt by Son Siwakorn here: https://www.artslicepod.com/shopAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

53mins

24 Feb 2022

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Re-air: The Unbelievable True Story of the Mystical Painter Agnes Pelton

The Art Angle

Art history thrives on stories of fearless visionaries leaving behind the lives they’ve known to embark on journeys into uncertain lands for personal enrichment and artistic illumination. But few are as surprising as that of Agnes Pelton, the spiritualist painter who departed New York in 1932—alone, at the age of 50—to begin a new chapter in the California desert. There, she supported herself for years by selling realistic portraits and landscape paintings to tourists while, largely unbeknownst to others, she also pursued a connection to the divine through one of the most forward-looking painting practices of the early 20th century.A lifelong student of occult literature and unorthodox philosophies, Pelton languished in obscurity for decades before and after her death in 1961. But a handful of perceptive curators and scholars eventually recognized the importance of her otherworldly, semi-abstract canvases, which intermingle ethereal forms with a few identifiable symbols loaded with deeper meaning, such as stars and mountains. Pelton’s supporters first succeeded in bringing her work to the larger art world’s attention in the late 1980s, and more than 30 years later, she became the subject of a sweeping and critically admired solo exhibition that traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art this spring (before the museum, like so many others, was forced to close until further notice). On this week’s episode, curator Barbara Haskell, who oversaw the Whitney’s installation of Pelton’s show, joins Andrew Goldstein to discuss the artist’s scandal-plagued upbringing, all-consuming engagement with spiritualism, and lasting relevance in a world once again seeking greater meaning beyond the physical realm.

27mins

4 Sep 2020

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Episode artwork

The Unbelievable True Story of the Mystical Painter Agnes Pelton

The Art Angle

Art history thrives on stories of fearless visionaries leaving behind the lives they've known to embark on journeys into uncertain lands for personal enrichment and artistic illumination. But few are as surprising as that of Agnes Pelton, the spiritualist painter who departed New York in 1932—alone, at the age of 50—to begin a new chapter in the California desert. There, she supported herself for years by selling realistic portraits and landscape paintings to tourists while, largely unbeknownst to others, she also pursued a connection to the divine through one of the most forward-looking painting practices of the early 20th century. A lifelong student of occult literature and unorthodox philosophies, Pelton languished in obscurity for decades before and after her death in 1961. But a handful of perceptive curators and scholars eventually recognized the importance of her otherworldly, semi-abstract canvases, which intermingle ethereal forms with a few identifiable symbols loaded with deeper meaning, such as stars and mountains. Pelton's supporters first succeeded in bringing her work to the larger art world's attention in the late 1980s, and more than 30 years later, she became the subject of a sweeping and critically admired solo exhibition that traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art this spring (before the museum, like so many others, was forced to close until further notice). On this week's episode, curator Barbara Haskell, who oversaw the Whitney's installation of Pelton's show, joins Andrew Goldstein to discuss the artist's scandal-plagued upbringing, all-consuming engagement with spiritualism, and lasting relevance in a world once again seeking greater meaning beyond the physical realm.

27mins

2 Apr 2020

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Agnes Pelton at the Phoenix Art Museum

Art Talk

Hunter Drohojowska-Philp talks about the artist’s transcendental modernism

3mins

7 Jun 2019