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Colten Boushie Podcasts

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Colten Boushie. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Colten Boushie, often where they are interviewed.

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Colten Boushie. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Colten Boushie, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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06-01-20 Putting the death of Colten Boushie in context

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Director Tasha Hubbard’s (Cree) 2019 film “nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up,” is picking up accolades and new attention. It recently won the 2020 Ted Rogers Best Feature Length Documentary at the Canadian Screen Awards. It recounts the story of Colten Boushie (Cree from Red Pheasant First Nation) who was shot to death after he wandered onto the property of a white farmer in 2016. His death and the acquittal of the man who shot him prompted concern, frustration and anger among First Nations people in Canada. Hubbard puts the shooting in context of the broader racial and cultural divide and her own personal experiences.
Jun 01 2020 · 56mins
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Case #085B: The Murder of Colten Boushie

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Occultae Veritatis Podcast  

Case #085B: The Murder of Colten Boushie

PART 2 Colten Boushie was a 22-year old indigenous man of the Cree Red Pheasant First Nation who was fatally shot on a rural Saskatchewan farm. The farmer, Gerald Stanley, stood trial  

Subscribe: https://ovpod.ca

Pallet cleanser: Justice for Colten and Tina

Artist: Bearhead Sisters  

Support the Show: http://www.patreon.com/ovpod

Aug 25 2019 · 49mins

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Case #085A: The Murder of Colten Boushie

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Occultae Veritatis Podcast

Case #085A: The Murder of Colten Boushie

Colten Boushie was a 22-year old indigenous man of the Cree Red Pheasant First Nation who was fatally shot on a rural Saskatchewan farm. The farmer, Gerald Stanley, stood trial

Subscribe: https://ovpod.ca

Pallet cleanser: Idle no More (Colten Boushie tribute)

Artist: MoneyMart

Support the Show: http://www.patreon.com/ovpod

Aug 18 2019 · 56mins
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Ep. 1 - Indigenous perspective on justice for Colten Boushie

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Colten Boushie was a 22-year-old Cree man from Red Pheasant First Nation. Gerald Stanley is the white Saskatchewan farmer who shot and killed him when Boushie and a group of friends trespassed on his property one August afternoon in 2016.

That afternoon, and the second-degree murder trial that followed it, polarized the province. Filmmaker Tasha Hubbard chronicled the family's story and situates it within a larger one - colonial violence, intergenerational trauma, and intergenerational resistance.

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

May 21 2019 · 26mins

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Ep. 128: Colten Boushie Retrospective

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On this week's episode, the second-last show in our Summer Series, we revisit the troubling death of Colten Boushie—the 22-year old member of the Red Pheasant First Nation shot and killed back in August of 2016 by a then-54-year-old white farmer named Gerald Stanley. Featured voices this episode include (in order of appearance): Documentarian and University of Saskatchewan assistant professor of English, Tasha Hubbard, as well as Chris Andersen, then-interim dean at the University of Alberta’s faculty of Native Studies; Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and, Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

Music this podcast includes two compositions by Welcome Wizard off their lunachild album: we heard the tracks “12 Diseases” and “Nautical Fistula.” We also heard the track “Endeavour” by Jahzzar. Learn more about these artists at freemusicarchive.org

Aug 17 2018 · 1hr 35mins
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Femme Am || Ep. 11 || Systemic Racism: MMIWG, Colten Boushie & Tina Fontaine

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https://ia601502.us.archive.org/21/items/FemmeAMIndigenousIssues1/Femme%20AM%20Indigenous%20Issues%20%281%29.mp3

In this episode of Femme AM, the Women’s Collective discusses the structural and systemic racism that exists in Canada’s treatment of indigenous people. Topics include the MMIWG inquiry, the hearings that took place in Montreal last week, as well as the Tina Fontaine and Colton Boushie cases.

Resources:
Discussion Guide – Justice for Colten Boushie
www.idlenomore.ca/discussion_guide…r_colten_boushie
Groundwork for Change
www.groundworkforchange.org/
Quebec Native Women Inc. (QNW)
www.faq-qnw.org/en/
Native Women’s Association of Canada
www.nwac.ca/
Native Women’s Shelter of Montreal
www.nwsm.info/

“[The Collective] would like to acknowledge that although we did interview indigenous women for this episode, and you will hear their voices, none of us, are ourselves, indigenous. That being said, we are women, we are Canadians, and we care about understanding our country’s complicated, violent, oppressive history and trying to effect positive change in the future. The mistreatment of indigenous people, the MMIWG epidemic, and the injustices we saw play out in the murders of Colton Bushie and Tina Fontaine have led us to feel that this is a topic which it is crucial we address at this time.”

Tune in live every Thursday at 2pm, only on CJLO.com and 1690am in Montreal.

Keep in touch with The CJLO Women’s Collective:
www.facebook.com/CJLOWomensCollective/
www.instagram.com/femmeam/

May 07 2018 ·
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Did the Accused Killers of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine Benefit from the Current Practice of Jury Selection? (Part 1)

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Canada’s justice system is working poorly for Indigenous peoples. Not-guilty verdicts arrived at recently in two separate murder cases involving First Nations victims, Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie, have arguably yet again exposed Canada’s justice system as failing Indigenous peoples.

Indigenous people have been murdered or gone missing for a long time without due diligence from law enforcement and only now are we starting to expose these patterns of neglect in a meaningful way. Still, if you are an Indigenous person in Canada today, chances are, you will have difficulty receiving justice.

The speaker will explain Canada’s jury selection system and argue that it needs a serious overhaul. She will also contend that unless we come to terms with the staggering amount of racism that still exists in our institutions, and in our society as a whole towards Indigenous peoples in Canada, not much will change.

Speaker: Ingrid Hess

Ingrid Hess is a lawyer from Lethbridge who has been practicing for over 21 years.  For the majority of her career she has focussed on criminal defence work, representing clients on all kinds of criminal and quasi-criminal charges in the Provincial Court, Court of Queen's Bench and Court of Appeal of Alberta, including a number of serious jury trials.  She has worked extensively with clients of Indigenous background.  Some of her important court cases have been cited in academic work pertaining to the treatment of individuals with FASD in the legal system.
 
In 2010 she was drawn into working on the Residential Schools Independent Assessment Process for compensation for serious physical and sexual abuse.  In that capacity she has worked on over 300 individual claims from BC through to Ontario and across the North, acquiring a very personal but also broad understanding of the historical and cultural circumstances of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples.  

Ms. Hess lives in Lethbridge and is mother to three young men.  Her eldest son is a member of the Big Stone Cree Nation and her younger two are both Blood Tribe members.  

Moderator: Kristin Krein

Date: Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Time: 11:30 am – 12:15 pm buffet lunch, 12:15 – 12:45 pm presentation, 1 – 1:30 pm Q & A
Location: Royal Canadian Legion (north door) 324 Mayor Magrath Dr. S
Cost:$14 buffet lunch with desert & coffee/tea/juice or $2 coffee/tea/juice. RSVP not required
Mar 13 2018 · 35mins
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Did the Accused Killers of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine Benefit from the Current Practice of Jury Selection? (Part 2 Q&A)

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Canada’s justice system is working poorly for Indigenous peoples. Not-guilty verdicts arrived at recently in two separate murder cases involving First Nations victims, Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie, have arguably yet again exposed Canada’s justice system as failing Indigenous peoples.

Indigenous people have been murdered or gone missing for a long time without due diligence from law enforcement and only now are we starting to expose these patterns of neglect in a meaningful way. Still, if you are an Indigenous person in Canada today, chances are, you will have difficulty receiving justice.

The speaker will explain Canada’s jury selection system and argue that it needs a serious overhaul. She will also contend that unless we come to terms with the staggering amount of racism that still exists in our institutions, and in our society as a whole towards Indigenous peoples in Canada, not much will change.

Speaker: Ingrid Hess

Ingrid Hess is a lawyer from Lethbridge who has been practicing for over 21 years.  For the majority of her career she has focussed on criminal defence work, representing clients on all kinds of criminal and quasi-criminal charges in the Provincial Court, Court of Queen's Bench and Court of Appeal of Alberta, including a number of serious jury trials.  She has worked extensively with clients of Indigenous background.  Some of her important court cases have been cited in academic work pertaining to the treatment of individuals with FASD in the legal system.
 
In 2010 she was drawn into working on the Residential Schools Independent Assessment Process for compensation for serious physical and sexual abuse.  In that capacity she has worked on over 300 individual claims from BC through to Ontario and across the North, acquiring a very personal but also broad understanding of the historical and cultural circumstances of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples.  

Ms. Hess lives in Lethbridge and is mother to three young men.  Her eldest son is a member of the Big Stone Cree Nation and her younger two are both Blood Tribe members.  

Moderator: Kristin Krein

Date: Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Time: 11:30 am – 12:15 pm buffet lunch, 12:15 – 12:45 pm presentation, 1 – 1:30 pm Q & A
Location: Royal Canadian Legion (north door) 324 Mayor Magrath Dr. S
Cost:$14 buffet lunch with desert & coffee/tea/juice or $2 coffee/tea/juice. RSVP not required
Mar 13 2018 · 29mins
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Ep. 102: Injustice for Colten Boushie

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It was a much-anticipated verdict in a much-discussed case: the 2016 shooting death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie, a member of the Red Pheasant First Nation in Saskatchewan. His accused killer: 56-year-old white farmer Gerald Stanley, charged with second-degree murder. A charge he was acquitted of last Friday evening, much to the shock, disgust, sadness and outrage of Indigenous people everywhere. This week on MEDIA INDIGENA, we discuss how we got to this point, the response, and where things might go from here.

Joining host Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 15 2018 · 1hr 23mins
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Gerald Stanley, Colten Boushie, and Justice

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Not a fun episode this week.

On Friday Gerald Stanley was acquitted of murdering Colten Boushie. People are often acquitted of serious crimes but this case was different. Boushie was a young indigenous man. Stanley was a white farmer. Boushie's friends said that they had some car trouble and went to the Stanley farm for help. Then Stanley murdered Boushie - for no real reason. Stanley said that Boushie was trying to steal some of his property and he accidentally shot him. So the best case scenario is that a white farmer shot a young indigenous man over some property.

But there was more to the story. The night Boushie was killed the RCMP treated his family like they had done something wrong.  In the aftermath of the killing "rural crime" - a dog whistle for indigenous people - was a hot topic in the Canadian Prairie. And then as the trial began the Stanley defence team used their peremptory jury challenges to exclude every potential indigenous juror

An all white jury acquitted a white farmer of killing an indigenous youth.

There was justifiable outrage and questions about racial bias in the justice system,

The Prime Minister and the Minister of Justice tweeted their outrage and sadness.  Those tweets also attracted scrutiny - the government should not be commenting on the outcomes of individual court cases. The government should take action to fix problems in the justice system but so far the Trudeau Government has chosen tweets over legislation.

This week we break down the Stanley verdict, talk about the jury selection process, and look at what can be done to make sure there is justice in the justice system.

Feb 12 2018 · 1hr 7mins