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Charlotte Brooks

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Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

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S04 E18 Book Club Chat: "The House Of Bondage Or Charlotte Brooks And Other Slaves"

Genealogy Adventures

In this episode, we discussed the first book covered in our Book Club: "The house of bondage: or, Charlotte Brooks and other slaves" by Octavia Victoria Rogers Albert (New York, Hunt & Eaton, 1890).Octavia met Charlotte Brooks for the first time in 1879 and later decided to interview her, as well as other former slaves from Louisiana, for a biographical sketch of slavery's "House of Bondage." These sketches were originally published in the Methodist newspaper Southwestern Christian Advocate but were not compiled into book form until 1890, after Octavia Albert's death.Rather than provide a comprehensive chronology of the events in Charlotte's life, Albert focuses on episodes that illustrate hostility from slave masters, as well as the ways in which religion influenced the slaves' everyday lives. In addition to interviewing Charlotte Brooks, Albert interviews several other former slaves, including John and Lorendo Goodwin, Lizzie Beaufort, Colonel Douglass Wilson, and a woman known merely as Hattie—though Charlotte's interviews make up the bulk of the text. These anecdotes are woven together to provide a harrowing image of the horrors suffered by slaves, as well the progress that former slaves are able to make through education.The book club chat included some of the genealogical issues that were apparent to us in the book in terms of researching enslaved people, social issues, and U.S. politics back then and in 2020.This book is free to read or download online via: https://archive.org/details/housebondageorc00mallgoog/page/n11/mode/2upTo see the first part of this serialized installment originally published in the Southwestern Christian Advocate (1890, New Orleans, La.), please visit: https://archive.org/details/southwesternchri1890sout/page/n3/mode/2up?q=octavia+V+albertIf you would like to buy the book, it is available for the on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/House-Bondage-Octavia-Rogers-Albert/dp/1596052546/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=octavia+V.+albert&qid=1611528442&sr=8-1

1hr

25 Jan 2021

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Charlotte Brooks, "American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949" (U California Press, 2019)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Between 1901 and World War II, up to half of all U.S.-born Chinese Americans relocated to China in search of better lives due to the discrimination they faced in the United States. Charlotte Brooks tells the story of these emigres in American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949 (University of California Press, 2019). Initially, Chinese American dual citizens found unprecedented professional opportunities as merchants and government officials in their ancestral homeland. However, shifting political conditions in China and hardening exclusionary policies in the U.S. narrowed their options in a world where they were considered neither Chinese nor American enough to receive the protection or respect of their governments. Faced with these constraints at a time of global depression and war, Chinese Americans made agonizing choices that led them down surprising paths—including, in some cases, as collaborators during the Japanese occupation of China. American Exodus challenges well-worn mythologies in the U.S. of upward mobility for immigrants, as well as celebratory and nationalist narratives in China about the overseas Chinese.Ian Shin is assistant professor of History and American Culture at the University of Michigan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

1hr 7mins

30 Dec 2019

Similar People

Episode artwork

Charlotte Brooks, "American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949" (U California Press, 2019)

New Books in Asian American Studies

Between 1901 and World War II, up to half of all U.S.-born Chinese Americans relocated to China in search of better lives due to the discrimination they faced in the United States. Charlotte Brooks tells the story of these emigres in American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949 (University of California Press, 2019). Initially, Chinese American dual citizens found unprecedented professional opportunities as merchants and government officials in their ancestral homeland. However, shifting political conditions in China and hardening exclusionary policies in the U.S. narrowed their options in a world where they were considered neither Chinese nor American enough to receive the protection or respect of their governments. Faced with these constraints at a time of global depression and war, Chinese Americans made agonizing choices that led them down surprising paths—including, in some cases, as collaborators during the Japanese occupation of China. American Exodus challenges well-worn mythologies in the U.S. of upward mobility for immigrants, as well as celebratory and nationalist narratives in China about the overseas Chinese.Ian Shin is assistant professor of History and American Culture at the University of Michigan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-american-studies

1hr 7mins

30 Dec 2019

Episode artwork

Charlotte Brooks, "American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949" (U California Press, 2019)

New Books in History

Between 1901 and World War II, up to half of all U.S.-born Chinese Americans relocated to China in search of better lives due to the discrimination they faced in the United States. Charlotte Brooks tells the story of these emigres in American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949 (University of California Press, 2019). Initially, Chinese American dual citizens found unprecedented professional opportunities as merchants and government officials in their ancestral homeland. However, shifting political conditions in China and hardening exclusionary policies in the U.S. narrowed their options in a world where they were considered neither Chinese nor American enough to receive the protection or respect of their governments. Faced with these constraints at a time of global depression and war, Chinese Americans made agonizing choices that led them down surprising paths—including, in some cases, as collaborators during the Japanese occupation of China. American Exodus challenges well-worn mythologies in the U.S. of upward mobility for immigrants, as well as celebratory and nationalist narratives in China about the overseas Chinese.Ian Shin is assistant professor of History and American Culture at the University of Michigan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 7mins

30 Dec 2019

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Charlotte Brooks, "American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949" (U California Press, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

Between 1901 and World War II, up to half of all U.S.-born Chinese Americans relocated to China in search of better lives due to the discrimination they faced in the United States. Charlotte Brooks tells the story of these emigres in American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949 (University of California Press, 2019). Initially, Chinese American dual citizens found unprecedented professional opportunities as merchants and government officials in their ancestral homeland. However, shifting political conditions in China and hardening exclusionary policies in the U.S. narrowed their options in a world where they were considered neither Chinese nor American enough to receive the protection or respect of their governments. Faced with these constraints at a time of global depression and war, Chinese Americans made agonizing choices that led them down surprising paths—including, in some cases, as collaborators during the Japanese occupation of China. American Exodus challenges well-worn mythologies in the U.S. of upward mobility for immigrants, as well as celebratory and nationalist narratives in China about the overseas Chinese.Ian Shin is assistant professor of History and American Culture at the University of Michigan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 7mins

30 Dec 2019