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Karin Wulf Podcasts

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5 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Karin Wulf. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Karin Wulf, often where they are interviewed.

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5 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Karin Wulf. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Karin Wulf, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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171. Reinterpreting Mary Ball Washington with Karin Wulf, Martha Saxton, Craig Shirley, and Charlene Boyer Lewis

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On today's show, we bring you the audio from our annual Martha Washington Lecture. This year's topic was Mary Ball Washington, George's mother, and the recent work by historians to rethink what we know about her life. Dr. Karin Wulf, executive director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, served as our guest moderator for this event. She was joined on the virtual stage by Martha Saxon, a  2020 George Washington Book Prize Finalist for her work, The Widow Washington: The Life of Mary Washington (2019); Craig Shirley, author of Mary Ball Washington: The Untold Story of George Washington’s Mother (2019); and Charlene Boyer Lewis, author of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte: An American Aristocrat in the Early Republic (2014).

About Our Guests:

Martha Saxton is Professor of History and Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies, and Elizabeth W. Bruss Reader, Emerita at Amherst College. In addition to The Widow Washington, Saxton is the author of Being Good: Women's Moral Values in Early America (2003), among numerous other publications. 

Craig Shirley is a veteran political advisor with a long career in service to the Republican Party. He is also the author of a number of works on American history, including December 1941: 31 Days That Changed America and Saved the World (2011), and Citizen Newt: The Making of a Reagan Conservative (2017).

Charlene M. Boyer Lewis is a professor of history and the director of the American studies program at Kalamazoo College. She specializes in women's history, southern history, and American cultural and social history in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is the author of Ladies and Gentlemen on Display: Planter Society at the Virginia Springs, 1790–1860 (2001) and is at work on a biography of Peggy Shippen Arnold. 

About Our Guest Moderator:

Karin Wulf is the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, which has been publishing the William and Mary Quarterly, the leading journal in early American scholarship, and books with the University of North Carolina Press, since 1943. She is also Professor of History at the College of William & Mary, and co-chair the College’s Neurodiversity Working Group. Her scholarship focuses on women, gender and family in the early modern British Atlantic.

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Aug 13 2020 · 1hr 10mins
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08 - Karin Wulf: Lineage and Politics in "Vast Early America"

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Karin Wulf is Professor of History at the College of William & Mary in the United States, where is is also the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. She specialises in the study of women, family, and gender in the Early Modern Atlantic world, and she has published several books on women's and social history in the British North American colonies. In this episode, she discusses her latest research, on lineage and genealogy, as well as the conceptual frameworks on which her research lies.

Jun 19 2020 · 54mins

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139. Harnessing the Power of Washington's Genealogy with Karin Wulf

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Early Americans like George Washington obsessed over genealogy. Much was at stake. One's place on the family tree could mean the difference between inheriting a plantation like Mount Vernon and its enslaved community, or working a patch of hardscrabble. Genealogy was very much a matter of custom, culture, and law, which explains in part why Washington composed a long-ignored document tracing his own lineage. It was as much a reflection of his family's past as it was a road map to his future power, wealth, and authority.

On today's episode, Dr. Karin Wulf helps us understand the powerful force that genealogy played in early American life. Wulf is a Professor of History at the College of William & Mary where she is also the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture (OI). A recent Washington Library research fellow, Wulf is writing a history of genealogy's essential role in British American society.  She also discusses the OI's leadership in the Georgian Papers Programme, and the OI's work to explore #vastearlyamerica

About Our Guest:

Karin Wulf is the director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, which has been publishing the William and Mary Quarterly, the leading journal in early American scholarship, and books with the University of North Carolina Press, since 1943. She is also Professor of History at the College of William & Mary, and co-chair the College’s Neurodiversity Working Group. Her scholarship focuses on women, gender and family in the early modern British Atlantic.

About Our Host:

Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. A historian of the American Revolution, Scotland, and the British Atlantic World, Ambuske graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA Law, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is currently at work on a book about emigration from Scotland in the era of the American Revolution as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.

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Jan 02 2020 · 48mins
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Karin Wulf on Scholarly Publishing and Women Also Know History

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In this episode AHR editor Alex Lichtenstein speaks with Karin Wulf, the Director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and Professor of History at the College of William and Mary. Wulf is a regular contributor to the Society for Scholarly Publishing’s blog The Scholarly Kitchen and a founding member of the initiative Women Also Know History. Wulf is the author of Not All Wives: Women of Colonial Philadelphia and two co-edited volumes of 18th century women’s writing. She’s currently completing a book exploring the relationship between genealogical practices and political culture titled “Lineage: The Practice of Genealogy and the Politics of Connection in 18th century British America.”

Sep 19 2019 · 21mins

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114 Karin Wulf, The History of Genealogy (Doing History)

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History has a history and genealogy has a history. And the histories of both affect how and why we study the past and how we understand and view it.

Today, we explore why it’s important for us to understand that the practices and processes of history and genealogy have histories by exploring what the history of genealogy reveals about the early American past.

Our guide for this exploration is Karin Wulf, a Professor of History at the College of William & Mary and the Director of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

About the Series

Doing History” episodes will introduce you to historians who will tell you what they know about the past and reveal how they came to their knowledge.

Each episode will air on the last Tuesday of each month in 2016.

This series is part of a partnership between Ben Franklin’s World and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

Show Notes: http://www.benfranklinsworld.com/114

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Dec 27 2016 · 48mins