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Howard Philips Smith

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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The Reading Life: Howard Philips Smith, Claudia Gray

The Reading Life

This week on The Reading Life: Howard Philips Smith, whose new book is “A Sojourn in Paradise: Jack Robinson in 1950s New Orleans.” And Claudia Gray, author of “House of El, Book One: The Shadow Threat.”

26mins

5 Feb 2021

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Southern Decadence in New Orleans" (LSU Press, 2018)

New Books in Gender

Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Co-written with Frank Perez (the president of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana) and published by the Louisiana State University Press in 2018, Southern Decadence in New Orleans provides the first comprehensive historical look at another important event in the Crescent City’s LGBTQ+ calendar.Commonly referred to as “Gay Mardi Gras,” the Southern Decadence festival began in 1972 as a spontaneous end-of-the-summer celebration of a group of friends who felt like outcasts because of their political views, sexual orientation, and/or racial identity. Over the last four decades, it has transformed into a gay extravaganza lasting almost a full week and culminating on a grand parade on the Sunday before Labor Day. It attracts hundreds of thousands of revellers from all over the world and is one of the city’s largest (and most lucrative) annual events. Smith and Frank combined interviews, participant observation, and archival materials to do document the trajectory of this fascinating phenomenon.Dr Isabel Machado is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Sexuality Studies at the Department of History of the University of Memphis. Her forthcoming book uses Carnival as a vehicle to understand social and cultural changes in Mobile, Alabama (USA) in the second half of the 20th century. Her new research project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico). She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

1hr 3mins

11 Jun 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Southern Decadence in New Orleans" (LSU Press, 2018)

New Books in History

Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Co-written with Frank Perez (the president of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana) and published by the Louisiana State University Press in 2018, Southern Decadence in New Orleans provides the first comprehensive historical look at another important event in the Crescent City’s LGBTQ+ calendar.Commonly referred to as “Gay Mardi Gras,” the Southern Decadence festival began in 1972 as a spontaneous end-of-the-summer celebration of a group of friends who felt like outcasts because of their political views, sexual orientation, and/or racial identity. Over the last four decades, it has transformed into a gay extravaganza lasting almost a full week and culminating on a grand parade on the Sunday before Labor Day. It attracts hundreds of thousands of revellers from all over the world and is one of the city’s largest (and most lucrative) annual events. Smith and Frank combined interviews, participant observation, and archival materials to do document the trajectory of this fascinating phenomenon.Dr Isabel Machado is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Sexuality Studies at the Department of History of the University of Memphis. Her forthcoming book uses Carnival as a vehicle to understand social and cultural changes in Mobile, Alabama (USA) in the second half of the 20th century. Her new research project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico). She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 3mins

11 Jun 2020

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Southern Decadence in New Orleans" (LSU Press, 2018)

New Books in American Studies

Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Co-written with Frank Perez (the president of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana) and published by the Louisiana State University Press in 2018, Southern Decadence in New Orleans provides the first comprehensive historical look at another important event in the Crescent City’s LGBTQ+ calendar.Commonly referred to as “Gay Mardi Gras,” the Southern Decadence festival began in 1972 as a spontaneous end-of-the-summer celebration of a group of friends who felt like outcasts because of their political views, sexual orientation, and/or racial identity. Over the last four decades, it has transformed into a gay extravaganza lasting almost a full week and culminating on a grand parade on the Sunday before Labor Day. It attracts hundreds of thousands of revellers from all over the world and is one of the city’s largest (and most lucrative) annual events. Smith and Frank combined interviews, participant observation, and archival materials to do document the trajectory of this fascinating phenomenon.Dr Isabel Machado is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Sexuality Studies at the Department of History of the University of Memphis. Her forthcoming book uses Carnival as a vehicle to understand social and cultural changes in Mobile, Alabama (USA) in the second half of the 20th century. Her new research project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico). She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 3mins

11 Jun 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Southern Decadence in New Orleans" (LSU Press, 2018)

New Books in the American South

Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New Orleans. Co-written with Frank Perez (the president of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana) and published by the Louisiana State University Press in 2018, Southern Decadence in New Orleans provides the first comprehensive historical look at another important event in the Crescent City’s LGBTQ+ calendar.Commonly referred to as “Gay Mardi Gras,” the Southern Decadence festival began in 1972 as a spontaneous end-of-the-summer celebration of a group of friends who felt like outcasts because of their political views, sexual orientation, and/or racial identity. Over the last four decades, it has transformed into a gay extravaganza lasting almost a full week and culminating on a grand parade on the Sunday before Labor Day. It attracts hundreds of thousands of revellers from all over the world and is one of the city’s largest (and most lucrative) annual events. Smith and Frank combined interviews, participant observation, and archival materials to do document the trajectory of this fascinating phenomenon.Dr Isabel Machado is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Sexuality Studies at the Department of History of the University of Memphis. Her forthcoming book uses Carnival as a vehicle to understand social and cultural changes in Mobile, Alabama (USA) in the second half of the 20th century. Her new research project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico). She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

1hr 3mins

11 Jun 2020

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans" (UP of Mississippi, 2017)

New Books in Gender

Howard Philips Smith has been investigating and writing about the gay history of New Orleans for over two decades. Raised on a small farm in rural Southern Mississippi, he studied French literature and taught English in a French lycée in Bordeaux thanks to a Fulbright Scholarship before moving to New Orleans in the 1980s. After a decade in the Crescent City, Smith moved to Los Angeles and completed his novel The Cult of the Mask, based on the experiences of New Orleans’ gay community before the onslaught of AIDS. The research for this work resulted in two books: Unveiling the Muse and Southern Decadence. In this interview, we discuss Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) a thorough investigation of the history of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras krewes.Gay Carnival krewes were first formed in New Orleans in the late 1950s, growing out of costume parties. Their balls were often held in clandestine locations to avoid harassment. Despite their rich history and important contribution to the city’s defining festival, gay New Orleans Carnival remained a hidden and almost lost history thanks in part to moments of crisis such as the AIDS epidemic and Hurricane Katrina. In Unveiling the Muse Howard Philips Smith not only recovers the story of these organizations and the fascinating people behind it, but also compiles an impressive collection of information/documents/sources/images that will certainly be extremely useful to those investigating not only the history of New Orleans, but also of festivities and of queer urban experiences across the globe. The book contains a list of all the balls, themes, and royalty of each krewe, along with stunning images of the colorful ephemera associated with the gay Mardi Gras balls: posters, invitations, costume and stage set sketches, and programs. Also of note are the photographs of the everyday lives and celebrations of queer people in the city in the post-World War II era, which help Philips contextualize these stories.Isabel Machado is a Brazilian historian, living and teaching in Mexico while finishing a book about Carnival in Mobile, Alabama. Her new project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León. She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

1hr 3mins

30 Jul 2019

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans" (UP of Mississippi, 2017)

New Books in Popular Culture

Howard Philips Smith has been investigating and writing about the gay history of New Orleans for over two decades. Raised on a small farm in rural Southern Mississippi, he studied French literature and taught English in a French lycée in Bordeaux thanks to a Fulbright Scholarship before moving to New Orleans in the 1980s. After a decade in the Crescent City, Smith moved to Los Angeles and completed his novel The Cult of the Mask, based on the experiences of New Orleans’ gay community before the onslaught of AIDS. The research for this work resulted in two books: Unveiling the Muse and Southern Decadence. In this interview, we discuss Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) a thorough investigation of the history of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras krewes.Gay Carnival krewes were first formed in New Orleans in the late 1950s, growing out of costume parties. Their balls were often held in clandestine locations to avoid harassment. Despite their rich history and important contribution to the city’s defining festival, gay New Orleans Carnival remained a hidden and almost lost history thanks in part to moments of crisis such as the AIDS epidemic and Hurricane Katrina. In Unveiling the Muse Howard Philips Smith not only recovers the story of these organizations and the fascinating people behind it, but also compiles an impressive collection of information/documents/sources/images that will certainly be extremely useful to those investigating not only the history of New Orleans, but also of festivities and of queer urban experiences across the globe. The book contains a list of all the balls, themes, and royalty of each krewe, along with stunning images of the colorful ephemera associated with the gay Mardi Gras balls: posters, invitations, costume and stage set sketches, and programs. Also of note are the photographs of the everyday lives and celebrations of queer people in the city in the post-World War II era, which help Philips contextualize these stories.Isabel Machado is a Brazilian historian, living and teaching in Mexico while finishing a book about Carnival in Mobile, Alabama. Her new project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León. She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

1hr 3mins

30 Jul 2019

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans" (UP of Mississippi, 2017)

New Books in American Studies

Howard Philips Smith has been investigating and writing about the gay history of New Orleans for over two decades. Raised on a small farm in rural Southern Mississippi, he studied French literature and taught English in a French lycée in Bordeaux thanks to a Fulbright Scholarship before moving to New Orleans in the 1980s. After a decade in the Crescent City, Smith moved to Los Angeles and completed his novel The Cult of the Mask, based on the experiences of New Orleans’ gay community before the onslaught of AIDS. The research for this work resulted in two books: Unveiling the Muse and Southern Decadence. In this interview, we discuss Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) a thorough investigation of the history of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras krewes.Gay Carnival krewes were first formed in New Orleans in the late 1950s, growing out of costume parties. Their balls were often held in clandestine locations to avoid harassment. Despite their rich history and important contribution to the city’s defining festival, gay New Orleans Carnival remained a hidden and almost lost history thanks in part to moments of crisis such as the AIDS epidemic and Hurricane Katrina. In Unveiling the Muse Howard Philips Smith not only recovers the story of these organizations and the fascinating people behind it, but also compiles an impressive collection of information/documents/sources/images that will certainly be extremely useful to those investigating not only the history of New Orleans, but also of festivities and of queer urban experiences across the globe. The book contains a list of all the balls, themes, and royalty of each krewe, along with stunning images of the colorful ephemera associated with the gay Mardi Gras balls: posters, invitations, costume and stage set sketches, and programs. Also of note are the photographs of the everyday lives and celebrations of queer people in the city in the post-World War II era, which help Philips contextualize these stories.Isabel Machado is a Brazilian historian, living and teaching in Mexico while finishing a book about Carnival in Mobile, Alabama. Her new project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León. She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 3mins

30 Jul 2019

Episode artwork

Howard Philips Smith, "Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans" (UP of Mississippi, 2017)

New Books in History

Howard Philips Smith has been investigating and writing about the gay history of New Orleans for over two decades. Raised on a small farm in rural Southern Mississippi, he studied French literature and taught English in a French lycée in Bordeaux thanks to a Fulbright Scholarship before moving to New Orleans in the 1980s. After a decade in the Crescent City, Smith moved to Los Angeles and completed his novel The Cult of the Mask, based on the experiences of New Orleans’ gay community before the onslaught of AIDS. The research for this work resulted in two books: Unveiling the Muse and Southern Decadence. In this interview, we discuss Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) a thorough investigation of the history of New Orleans’ Mardi Gras krewes.Gay Carnival krewes were first formed in New Orleans in the late 1950s, growing out of costume parties. Their balls were often held in clandestine locations to avoid harassment. Despite their rich history and important contribution to the city’s defining festival, gay New Orleans Carnival remained a hidden and almost lost history thanks in part to moments of crisis such as the AIDS epidemic and Hurricane Katrina. In Unveiling the Muse Howard Philips Smith not only recovers the story of these organizations and the fascinating people behind it, but also compiles an impressive collection of information/documents/sources/images that will certainly be extremely useful to those investigating not only the history of New Orleans, but also of festivities and of queer urban experiences across the globe. The book contains a list of all the balls, themes, and royalty of each krewe, along with stunning images of the colorful ephemera associated with the gay Mardi Gras balls: posters, invitations, costume and stage set sketches, and programs. Also of note are the photographs of the everyday lives and celebrations of queer people in the city in the post-World War II era, which help Philips contextualize these stories.Isabel Machado is a Brazilian historian, living and teaching in Mexico while finishing a book about Carnival in Mobile, Alabama. Her new project is an investigation of different generations of artists and performers who challenge gender normativity in Monterrey, Nuevo León. She also works as an Assistant Producer for the Sexing History podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 3mins

30 Jul 2019