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Best Startup Podcasts

Updated about 1 month ago

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The best podcast episodes on Startups. For anyone working in a startup, or anyone interested in the incredible stories behind how people built companies like Instagram, and Facebook. Offering both practical advice and insights, as well as the stories for how many of the biggest startups got to where they are today. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Read more

The best podcast episodes on Startups. For anyone working in a startup, or anyone interested in the incredible stories behind how people built companies like Instagram, and Facebook. Offering both practical advice and insights, as well as the stories for how many of the biggest startups got to where they are today. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Cover image of Best Startup Podcasts

Best Startup Podcasts

Updated about 1 month ago

Read more

The best podcast episodes on Startups. For anyone working in a startup, or anyone interested in the incredible stories behind how people built companies like Instagram, and Facebook. Offering both practical advice and insights, as well as the stories for how many of the biggest startups got to where they are today. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

All Episodes

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: The Reid Hoffman Story (Part 1) — Make everyone a hero

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In this special episode, we turn the tables on host Reid Hoffman. He’s the guest and we tell his story, while proving a theory that’s perfect for Reid: You can chart an epic journey to scale, if you make everyone a hero along the way. Guest Host is June Cohen, Executive Producer of Masters of Scale, CEO of WaitWhat, and former Executive Producer of TED. Cameo Apperance: Matthew Mercer, host of the web series Critical Role.

Mar 11 2019
43 mins
Play

Y Combinator: #107 - Vinod Khosla and Sam Altman

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Vinod Khosla is the founder of Khosla Ventures, a firm focused on assisting entrepreneurs to build impactful new energy and technology companies. Previously he was the founding CEO of Sun Microsystems, where he pioneered open systems and commercial RISC processors.How to Build the Future is hosted by Sam Altman.***Topics00:30 - Vinod’s intro01:20 - A zero-million-dollar company vs a zero-billion-dollar company4:20 - What percentage of investors in Silicon Valley are good long-term company builders?4:50 - Who has earned the right to advise an entrepreneur?6:50 - Which risk to take when7:20 - Helpful board members8:15 - Who to trust for what advice11:00 - First principles thinking and rate of change13:00 - Evaluating a candidate in an interview14:15 - How much should a founder have planned and how ambitious should a founder be?16:30 - Recruiting great people19:00 - Building a phenomenal early team20:20 - Being generous with early employee equity27:00 - Gene pool engineering27:18 - The art, science, and labor of recruiting28:20 - How founders should think about investors31:00 - Doers vs pontificators32:00 - What does Vinod want to do in the next ten years?32:10 - Reinventing Societal Infrastructure with Technology

Mar 11 2019
35 mins
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Conversations with Tyler: Sam Altman on Loving Community, Hating Coworking, and the Hunt for Talent

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Founders aren’t superheroes, says Sam Altman.They may play extreme sports, respond to emails within seconds, and start billion-dollar companies, but they are rarely the product of extraordinary circumstance. In fact, they tend to be solidly upper-middle class, reasonably smart, and with loving parents.  So would Sam fund Peter Parker? What about Bruce Wayne? Tyler and Sam discuss these burning questions and more, including what’s wrong with San Francisco, Napoleon’s underrated skill, nuclear energy, the greatest invention of the Industrial Revolution, his rant against coworking spaces, UBI and AGI, risk and regret, optimism and beauty, and why venture capitalists don’t have superpowers either. Follow Sam on Twitter Follow Tyler on Twitter More CWT goodness: Facebook Twitter Email

Mar 11 2019
1 hour 8 mins
Play

Venture Stories: What Justin Kan Thinks About Basically Everything

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Erik is joined by Justin Kan (@justinkan), founder of Atrium, Twitch and others, as well as Anuj Abrol (@nujabrol), Justin’s Chief of Staff and Erik's co-host for this episode. Justin talks about the wisdom he’s gained over the past few years after selling Twitch and founding Atrium. He explains why it’s important to stay humble, not get too attached to any particular outcome for your startup and why he wishes that someone had told him ten years ago that no amount of accomplishment will create lasting happiness. They discuss Atrium and the services for startups space more broadly, including some ideas for “Atrium for X” startups. He explains how he came to the idea for Atrium and why he raised funds for the company when he could have bootstrapped it himself. They also cover the fundraising process more broadly and why Justin insists he isn’t that great of an investor. Justin also talks about his time as a “Snap star,” how Silicon Valley has changed, and what he’s learned from Paul Graham, Sam Altman, Michael Seibel and others. Quotable Lines From This Episode “I used to spend a lot of time thinking about, how I am going to be remembered and thought about and optimize the way people thought about me but I don’t care anymore. However you think of me today, as someone who's been an entrepreneur and had some success, maybe you think I’m really smart, it doesn't matter. In 10, 20, 50 years it will fade away and you probably won’t remember me at all. That’s okay, it’s just part of life.” “Startups in general are a great vehicle for your own personal growth and development, to learn new skills, to learn what it’s like to lead a big organization, to see if you can do it — if you deserve to at all — it’s not a foregone conclusion.” “You build up these castles in your mind about things that are going to bring satisfaction… none of those things will ever build any lasting long-term happiness. Even if you accomplish them and build a great reputation, it’s going to fade. The sooner you accept that, the happier you’ll be. I wish someone had told me that ten years ago.” Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal. Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mar 11 2019
1 hour 9 mins
Play

How I Built This with Guy Raz: Virgin: Richard Branson

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Richard Branson took a record shop and built it into a label, a bank, an airline, space tourism, and 200 other businesses — all under the name Virgin. But the serial entrepreneur has also had his share of failures.

Feb 19 2019
34 mins
Play

Conversations with Tyler: Sam Altman on Loving Community, Hating Coworking, and the Hunt for Talent

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Founders aren’t superheroes, says Sam Altman.They may play extreme sports, respond to emails within seconds, and start billion-dollar companies, but they are rarely the product of extraordinary circumstance. In fact, they tend to be solidly upper-middle class, reasonably smart, and with loving parents.  So would Sam fund Peter Parker? What about Bruce Wayne? Tyler and Sam discuss these burning questions and more, including what’s wrong with San Francisco, Napoleon’s underrated skill, nuclear energy, the greatest invention of the Industrial Revolution, his rant against coworking spaces, UBI and AGI, risk and regret, optimism and beauty, and why venture capitalists don’t have superpowers either. Follow Sam on Twitter Follow Tyler on Twitter More CWT goodness: Facebook Twitter Email

Feb 15 2019
1 hour 8 mins
Play

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: Netflix's Reed Hastings in Culture Shock

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I believe strong company cultures only emerge when every employee feels they own the culture — and this begins even before the first job interview. CEO Reed Hastings has built an adaptive, high-performing culture at NetFlix by being unabashedly upfront about who they are and who they aren’t. The company’s famous “culture deck” offers a 100-slide description of how NetFlix sees itself — not a “family” but a high performing sports team. It won’t appeal to everyone — and that’s the point. If you can define your culture tightly, while also resonating deeply with a diverse group of employees, you have a winning formula.

Feb 13 2019
36 mins
Play

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish: The Art of Letting Other People Have Your Way

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In this episode, we get negotiation coaching from Chris Voss, former lead international kidnapping negotiator for the FBI. *** Whether you’re buying a car, requesting a raise at work, or just deciding where to eat out with your spouse or partner, your negotiating skills will determine how pleased you are with the outcome. Today, we have the special opportunity to learn some of the most effective tactics and strategies from a true master, Chris Voss. Chris is the former lead international kidnapping negotiator for the FBI and author of the excellent book, Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As Though Your Life Depended On It. In this fascinating conversation, Chris shares how you can use the same techniques that have been field tested in some of the most high-stakes, pressure cooker situations, in your daily life. If you want to become a better haggler, a better communicator, or a better listener, don’t miss this episode. It’s packed with actionable insights you can start using today to be more persuasive and grab hold of more of what you want in life. Here are just a few things we cover: What it really takes to be great at negotiating (most people approach it all wrong) How to keep your emotions in check in a negotiation The three different voices you use to connect with your counterpart and put them at ease How many of us “take ourselves hostage” in a negotiation and ruin it before it starts The biggest time-waster (and profit-killer) that plagues so many negotiations The main problems with traditional negotiation techniques (BATNA etc) and how they’re leaving lots on the table The “negotiation one-sheet” Chris uses before entering into any negotiation (and how you can use it to) How to use an “accusations audit” when you’re structuring winning deals (this is brilliant) One technique to get your counterpart to spill their guts when they’re trying to be tight-lipped. “Prospect theory” and how to use it to your advantage Maximizing employee satisfaction in the hiring process so you get the best talent...and keep them! How empathy saves time and makes you more likely to get what you want in a negotiation The power of deference (and when to use it) Chris’ go to tools that work best on all personality types, in nearly any situation How intentionally getting the other party to say “no” substantially increases the success rate of a negotiation And much more. An edited transcript is available to members of the Farnam Street Learning Community or for purchase separately ($9). *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode and more go to https://www.fs.blog/podcast/ Our free weekly email, Brain Food, helps you get better results through intelligent preparation and offers great reading recommendations. Don't miss out, sign up at https://www.fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow Shane on Twitter (https://twitter.com/farnamstreet) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FarnamStreet/) to go to bed smarter than you woke up. 

Feb 13 2019
1 hour 22 mins
Play

How I Built This with Guy Raz: Edible Arrangements: Tariq Farid

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When Tariq Farid was 12, he emigrated from Pakistan to the U.S. – and quickly found a job at a local flower shop. Eventually he opened his own shop, which eventually led to the crazy idea to make flower bouquets out of fruit. Edible Arrangements has now bloomed into a franchise of nearly 1300 locations with an annual revenue of $600 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how the Seattle-based clothing company, Five12, is making athletic wear out of used coffee grounds.

Jan 30 2019
49 mins
Play

Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher: Did Instagram copy Snapchat? (Kevin Systrom, CEO, Instagram)

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Instagram CEO and co-founder Kevin Systrom talks with Recode's Kara Swisher about why he's still working at Facebook five years after it bought his company for $1 billion. Systrom shares what he has learned from the executives there and why he insisted from day one that his new colleagues not call Instagram a "photo-sharing app" — which surprised Mark Zuckerberg. He also addresses allegations that Instagram has "copied" features from Snapchat, saying no tech product is completely original and that it's better for consumers if companies in the same space are constantly trying to one-up each other. Later in the show, Systrom explains why he feels personally responsible to make the internet a safer place, and what he's doing toward that goal.

Jan 30 2019
1 hour 9 mins
Play

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: Google/Alphabet's Eric Schmidt in Innovation = Managed Chaos

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Google has succeeded by innovating again and again. Not just search, but Gmail and Google Docs and even self-driving cars. Their secret? They don’t tell their employees how to innovate; they manage the chaos. Eric Schmidt—CEO of Google since 2001 and now Chairman of parent company Alphabet—shares the controversial management techniques he created to cultivate an environment of free-flowing ideas plus disciplined decision making that lead to breakthrough ideas. He reveals the hidden secret in Google’s famous “20% time” policy, their approach to hiring smart creatives, and the parallels between leading Google and piloting small airplanes. Plus, his “roommate” at Google, and the decision he made to support a crazy idea that he was certain would bankrupt the company.

Jan 11 2019
30 mins
Play

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish: Earning Your Stripes

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On this episode of the Knowledge Project Podcast, I chat with Patrick Collison, co-founder and CEO of the leading online payment processing company, Stripe. If you’ve purchased anything online recently, there’s a good chance that Stripe facilitated the transaction. What is now an organization with over a thousand employees and handling tens of billions of dollars of online purchases every year, began as a small side experiment while Patrick and his brother John were going to college.   During our conversation, Patrick shares the details of their unlikely journey and some of the hard-earned wisdom he picked up along the way. I hope you have something handy to write with because the nuggets per minute in this episode are off the charts. Patrick was so open and generous with his responses that I’m really excited for you to hear what he has to say. Here are just a few of the things we cover: The biggest (and most valuable) mistakes Patrick made in the early days of Stripe and how they helped him get better The characteristics that Patrick looks for in a new hire to fit and contribute to the Stripe company culture What compelled he and his brother to move forward with the early concept of Stripe, even though on paper it was doomed to fail from the start The gaps Patrick saw in the market that dozens of other processing companies were missing — and how he capitalized on them The lessons Patrick learned from scaling Stripe from two employees (he and his brother) to nearly 1,000 today How he evaluates the upsides and potential dangers of speculative positions within the company How his Irish upbringing influenced his ability to argue and disagree without taking offense (and how we can all be a little more “Irish”) The power of finding the right peer group in your social and professional circles and how impactful and influential it can be in determining where you end up. The 4 ways Patrick has modified his decision making process over the last 5 years and how it’s helped him develop as a person and as a business leader (this part alone is worth the listen) Patrick’s unique approach to books and how he chooses what he’s going to spend his time reading ...life in Silicon Valley, Baumol’s cost disease, and so, so much more. Patrick truly is one of the most warm, humble and down to earth people I’ve had the pleasure to speak with and I thoroughly enjoyed our conversation together. I hope you will too! *** For comprehensive show notes on this episode, including a full edited transcript, go to https://www.fs.blog/podcast/ My free weekly Brain Food digest helps you upgrade your thinking. Don't miss out, sign up at https://www.fs.blog/newsletter/ Follow Shane on Twitter (https://twitter.com/farnamstreet)

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 49 mins
Play

The Kevin Rose Show: #21 - Serge Faguet - How to biohack your intelligence  with everything from sex to modafinil to MDMA

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Serge is a hardcore biohacker and serial entrepreneur. In this episode we talk about Serge's extreme daily regimen of compounds to biohack every aspect of his brain and body. Serge has studied at Cornell, worked at Google, and was youngest in his class at Stanford Business School. Do not try any of this at home.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 44 mins
Play

Freakonomics Radio: Pick of the Week: What Does a C.E.O. Actually Do? (Ep. 314)

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From the archive — They're paid a fortune — but for what, exactly? What makes a good C.E.O. — and how can you even tell? Is "leadership science" a real thing — or just airport-bookstore mumbo jumbo? We put these questions to Mark Zuckerberg, Richard Branson, Indra Nooyi, Satya Nadella, Jack Welch, Ray Dalio, Carol Bartz, David Rubenstein, and Ellen Pao. (Part 1 of a special series, "The Secret Life of C.E.O.'s.")

Jan 10 2019
38 mins
Play

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg in Imperfect is Perfect

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If you’re Steve Jobs, you can wait for your product to be perfect. But there are almost no Steve Jobs’ in the world. For the rest of us, If you’re not embarrassed by your first product release, you’ve released it too late. Imperfect is perfect. Why? Because your assumptions about what people want are never exactly right. Most entrepreneurs create great products through a tight feedback loop with real customers using a real product. So don’t fear imperfections; they won’t make or break your company. What will make or break you is speed. And no one knows this better than Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg. He shares the origin story of his famous mantra, “move fast and break things” and how this ethos applied as Facebook evolved from student project to tech giant.

Jan 10 2019
29 mins
Play

Greymatter: Eric Schmidt on Structuring Teams and Scaling Google | Blitzscaling 08

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This is session 8 of Technology-enabled Blitzscaling, a Stanford University class taught by Reid Hoffman, John Lilly, Allen Blue, and Chris Yeh. This class features Reid Hoffman interviewing Eric Schmidt, the Executive Chairman of Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google).

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 23 mins
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Y Combinator: #100 - Sam Altman

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Sam Altman expands on ideas that have come up in several of his essays. Specifically: choosing projects, creating value, and finding purpose.Sam’s the president of YC Group and co-chairman of OpenAI. You can find him on Twitter @sama.The YC podcast is hosted by Craig Cannon. ***Topics 1:25 - From The Days Are Long But The Decades Are Short - Minimize your own cognitive load from distracting things that don’t really matter. It’s hard to overstate how important this is, and how bad most people are at it.3:50 - Stepping back and evaluating your work5:30 - Creating metrics for your projects6:30 - Taking a year off 9:30 - Figuring out when to commit11:30 - Poker12:30 - From Productivity - Sleep seems to be the most important physical factor in productivity for me. Exercise is probably the second most important physical factor. The third area is nutrition. 15:00 - From You and Your Research by Richard Hamming - "If what you are doing is not important, and if you don't think it is going to lead to something important, why are you at Bell Labs working on it?"16:30 - From The Days Are Long But The Decades Are Short - Things in life are rarely as risky as they seem. Most people are too risk-averse, and so most advice is biased too much towards conservative paths.17:30 - Perspective shifts20:15 - From Productivity - My system has three key pillars: “Make sure to get the important s**t done”, “Don’t waste time on stupid s**t”, and “make a lot of lists”.22:30 - What Happened to Innovation24:50 - From You and Your Research by Richard Hamming - He who works with the door open gets all kinds of interruptions, but he also occasionally gets clues as to what the world is and what might be important. 26:50 - The deferred life plan doesn’t work31:50 - From The Merge - Our self-worth is so based on our intelligence that we believe it must be singular and not slightly higher than all the other animals on a continuum. Perhaps the AI will feel the same way and note that differences between us and bonobos are barely worth discussing. 34:10 - Weight training35:30 - The Way to Love by Anthony de Mello

Jan 10 2019
36 mins
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Office Hours with Spencer Rascoff: Sheryl Sandberg: COO of Facebook

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Dubbed Silicon Valley's "oddest couple" by The New York Times, together Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg have driven Facebook's astronomical growth and supported one another along the way. The keys to their successful COO-CEO partnership: open communication, commitment to their relationship and shared values.

Jan 10 2019
17 mins
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How I Built This with Guy Raz: Instagram: Kevin Systrom & Mike Krieger

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We're hard at work planning our upcoming live shows, so we bring you this favorite from the last year: Instagram. Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger launched their photo-sharing app with a server that crashed every other hour. Despite a chaotic start, it became one of the most popular apps in the world. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," we check back with Dave Weiner of Priority Bicycles, a low-maintenance bicycle brand.

Jan 10 2019
33 mins
Play

Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg: The Kara Swisher interview

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks with Recode's Kara Swisher about a litany of issues, including the Cambridge Analytica scandal and why Infowars and other conspiracy theorists, like Holocaust deniers, don't get kicked off Facebook. He says he believes over-regulating tech companies is dangerous because it could advantage Chinese firms that don’t share Americans’ commitment to freedom of expression. Zuckerberg also talks about how he thinks VR and AR will change the future of work, explains why his 2017 tour of the U.S. was not a political campaign and says that if anyone should be fired for Facebook's recent privacy stumbles, "It should be me." However, he declines to fire himself, instead committing to an audit of all the other companies like Cambridge Analytica that had access to the most user data.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 22 mins
Play

Lean Startup: #50 Marc Andreessen | Chris Dixon, An Interview with Marc Andreessen and Chris Dixon

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With unmatched experience as entrepreneurs and investors, Marc and Chris have insights to share that are directly useful for almost any business trying to innovate. Eric Ries will interview Marc and Chris.

Jan 10 2019
54 mins
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Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: Airbnb's Brian Chesky in Handcrafted

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If you want your company to truly scale, you first have to do things that don't scale. Handcraft the core experience. Get your hands dirty. Serve your customers one-by-one. And don't stop until you know exactly what they want. That's what Brian Chesky did. As CEO of Airbnb, Brian’s early work was more akin to a traveling salesman. He takes us back to his lean years – when he went door-to-door, meeting Airbnb hosts in person – and shares the imaginative route to crafting what he calls an "11-star experience.”

Jan 10 2019
29 mins
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Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman: Escape the Competition w/ PayPal's Peter Thiel

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If you want to grow your business, your goal isn’t to beat the competition — it’s to escape the competition altogether. No one knows this better than Paypal founder Peter Thiel. “Competition is for losers,” he’s been known to say. Thiel is a former colleague, frequent co-investor and long-time intellectual sparring partner with Host Reid Hoffman. Their combined thinking on the competitive landscape is unmissable.

Jan 10 2019
41 mins
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How I Built This with Guy Raz: Chipotle: Steve Ells

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In 1992, Steve Ells was a classically trained chef working in a high-end restaurant in San Francisco. But after eating a burrito at a local taqueria, he got an idea: to sell burritos and earn enough money to open his own gourmet restaurant. The first Chipotle opened in Denver the following year. Bringing his culinary training to taqueria-style service, Steve Ells helped transform the way we eat fast food. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That," how Alexander Harik turned his mom's recipe for za'atar spread—a fragrant Middle Eastern condiment—into Zesty Z: The Za'atar Company.

Jan 05 2019
52 mins
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