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Best Interesting things Podcasts

Updated 3 months ago

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The best podcast episodes on interesting things. Random facts and things spanning from artificial sweeteners, to understanding blockchain, to learning about willpower, this topic covers anything and everything. If you like the podcast 'Stuff you should know', you'll love the episodes in this topic. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Read more

The best podcast episodes on interesting things. Random facts and things spanning from artificial sweeteners, to understanding blockchain, to learning about willpower, this topic covers anything and everything. If you like the podcast 'Stuff you should know', you'll love the episodes in this topic. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

Cover image of Best Interesting things Podcasts

Best Interesting things Podcasts

Updated 3 months ago

Read more

The best podcast episodes on interesting things. Random facts and things spanning from artificial sweeteners, to understanding blockchain, to learning about willpower, this topic covers anything and everything. If you like the podcast 'Stuff you should know', you'll love the episodes in this topic. Listen below to hear the incredible episodes just like you do in a mobile app, play in background and save episodes for later in your queue!

All Episodes

TED Talks Daily: 3 ways to make better decisions -- by thinking like a computer | Tom Griffiths

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If you ever struggle to make decisions, here's a talk for you. Cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths shows how we can apply the logic of computers to untangle tricky human problems, sharing three practical strategies for making better decisions -- on everything from finding a home to choosing which restaurant to go to tonight.

Mar 11 2019
11 mins
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TED Talks Daily: Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers | Steven Pinker

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Was 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is problem-solving, and we should look at things like climate change and nuclear war as problems to be solved, not apocalypses in waiting. "We will never have a perfect world, and it would be dangerous to seek one," he says. "But there's no limit to the betterments we can attain if we continue to apply knowledge to enhance human flourishing."

Mar 11 2019
18 mins
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Science Vs: Artificial Sweeteners - not so sweet?

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Low calorie, no calorie and so sweet. Artificial sweeteners just seem too good to be true. Is there a catch? We dig into two big questions: Do artificial sweeteners cause cancer, and are they making us fat? We talk to Prof. John Glendinning, Prof. Susie Swithers, Dr. Kieron Rooney, and PhD student Jotham Suez about the latest research. Plus we do a fun experiment with PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman from Reply All!  Also, please sign up for our brand spanking new newsletter! We’ll share science that’s been blowing our minds, plus great content like the most amazing calculation from an academic of how much bigger 323 African Elephants are than nuclear waste. Head to: https://gimletmedia.com/newsletter/  Our Sponsors:Postmates - New customers get a $100 credit by downloading the app and entering the promo code SCIENCEWordpress - go to wordpress.com/science to get 15% off a new websiteHello Fresh - For $30 off your first week of meals go to hellofresh.com and enter the promo code SCIENCEVS30 Credits: This episode has been produced by Ben Kuebrich, Heather Rogers, Shruti Ravindran and Wendy Zukerman.Kaitlyn Sawrey is our senior producer. We’re edited by Annie-Rose Strasser. Production assistance by Stevie Lane. Fact checking by Michelle Harris. Original music and mixing by Bobby Lord. Extra thanks to Dr. Mary Pat Gallagher, Peter Bresnan, Euromonitor International and ubiome.   Selected References:Prof. Susie Swithers’s study on artificial sweeteners and feeding behavior in ratsA 2015 systematic review of the relationship between artificial sweetener consumption and cancer in humansJotham Suez’s study on artificial sweeteners and the gut microbiome

Feb 19 2019
53 mins
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Stuff You Should Know: SYSK Selects: How Willpower Works

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You use it every day to overcome your lower self (which wants you to eat cake until your vision blurs) in pursuit of the goals of your higher self (which wants you to not develop Type-II diabetes). Yet it was only in the 1990s that researchers began to understand what makes our willpower and how it behaves.

Feb 19 2019
33 mins
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TED Talks Daily: Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers | Steven Pinker

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Was 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is problem-solving, and we should look at things like climate change and nuclear war as problems to be solved, not apocalypses in waiting. "We will never have a perfect world, and it would be dangerous to seek one," he says. "But there's no limit to the betterments we can attain if we continue to apply knowledge to enhance human flourishing."

Feb 13 2019
18 mins
Play

StarTalk Radio: Cosmic Queries: Spacetime

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Unravel the fabric of spacetime when astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Godfrey dive into fan-submitted questions about Einstein's theory of relativity, dark matter, the Fermi paradox, black holes, quantum physics, and more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/

Feb 13 2019
50 mins
Play

TED Radio Hour: Shifting Time

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We live our lives by the calendar and the clock, but time is also an abstraction, even an illusion. In this hour, TED speakers explore how our sense of time changes depending on who and where we are. Guests include director Cesar Kuriyama, poet Rives, psychologist Dan Gilbert, psychologist Laura Carstensen, and cosmologist Sean Carroll. (Original broadcast date: June 19, 2015)

Feb 13 2019
52 mins
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Hidden Brain: When Did Marriage Become So Hard?

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Marriage is hard — and there are signs it's becoming even harder. This week on Hidden Brain, we examine how long-term relationships have changed over time, and whether we might be able to improve marriage by asking less of it.

Feb 13 2019
51 mins
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Radiolab: Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - The Political Thicket

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The question of how much power the Supreme Court should possess has divided justices over time. But the issue was perhaps never more hotly debated than in Baker v. Carr. On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about the case that pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court – and the nation – forever.

Feb 13 2019
43 mins
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99% Invisible: 242- Mini-Stories: Volume 2

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Part 2 where host Roman Mars talks to the 99pi producers about their favorite “Mini-Stories.” These are little anecdotes or seeds of a story about design and architecture that can’t quite stretch into a full episode, but we love them … Continue reading →

Jan 30 2019
29 mins
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Invest Like the Best: Hash Power – Ep. 1 - Understanding Blockchains

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Welcome to the first episode of Hash Power, an audio documentary that explores the world of blockchain and cryptocurrencies with leaders in the field like Naval Ravikant, Olaf Carlson-Wee, Fred Ehrsam, & Ari Paul. Hash Power is meant to be an introduction, but really, it is an invitation to explore this emerging world on your own.  In the coming weeks, we will cover the technology, the power of decentralization, bitcoin, Ethereum, ICOs, cryptography and hashing. We will spend time with the leading active hedge fund managers in the field, and with outside investors who are both optimistic and skeptical. Episode one covers the big picture, and answers the question: what is blockchain and why might it significantly affect our world? If you enjoy what follows, you’ll still be very early in understanding this field. Most don’t. So help me spread it like wildfire, because the more people that understand blockchain, the better its impact might become. Please enjoy episode one, and stay tuned next week for episode 2, which explores investing in cryptocurrencies. Hash Power is presented by Fidelity Investments   For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to http://investorfieldguide.com/hashpower For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. To get involved with Project Frontier, head to InvestorFieldGuide.com/frontier. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag   Books Referenced The Sovereign Individual: Mastering the Transition to the Information Age Nostalgia for the Absolute   Links Referenced Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System Reddit User jav_rddt SHA-256 Calculator The BitCoin Model for Crowdfunding Fat Protocols #cryptotwitter   Show Notes 0:05 – Introduction    CHAPTER 1 – Understanding the Concept of Blockchain (3:25) 4:30 – Jeremiah Lowin explains how blockchain is like a database             5:14 – Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System 5:46 – Owning a digital asset 7:14 – Naval Ravikant, CEO of Angelist on how blockchains can help to create personal networks and organize humans 11:01 – How blockchains represent a way to coordinate global activity through tokens 13:33 – New coins popping up around data storage and utility needs like solar panels 14:57 – Permission vs permissionless networks 16:37 – Protocols and the introduction of scarcity 18:13 – Keeping track of scarcity and the introduction of tokens 18:49 – Societal structures and how blockchains will change them again             18:51 – The Sovereign Individual: Mastering the Transition to the Information Age 21:55 – The role of blockchains in the informational age and the rise of more individual sovereignty 23:29 - Fred Ehrsam, co-founder of Coinbase, on the increasing shift to digital worlds led by incentive structures   CHAPTER 2 – Blockchain Technology (27:48)             29:09 - Reddit User jav_rddt             30:43 - SHA-256 Calculator 31:53 - Charlie Noyes, Pantera Capital, explains how SHA-256 was developed and what make its so special 35:48 – How miners create new blocks and the incentives to do so 40:22 – The nonce field 43:48 – The incentives that exist for miners and the arms race to build more powerful systems to mine 45:20 – The development of mining pools 46:54 – Ethereum, the “spiritual successor” to bitcoin 48:36 – How the Ether network is an ecosystem in which other tokens can sit 50:51 - Naval Ravikant on alternative coins or tokens             50:50 - The BitCoin Model for Crowdfunding 51:37 – How the protocol creators are the ones getting wealthy             52:35 – Fat Proto

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 9 mins
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Stuff You Should Know: SYSK Selects: How Guide Dogs Work

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You know how when you see a guide dog leading a blind person to their destination and you think, "There goes a truly great dog?" It turns out you are absolutely correct. Guide dogs are about as special as dogs can get and it's through years of hard work. Learn about the ins and outs of guide dogs in this episode.

Jan 10 2019
43 mins
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You Are Not So Smart: 100 - The Replication Crisis

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"Science is wrong about everything, but you can trust it more than anything." That's the assertion of psychologist Brian Nosek, director of the Center for Open Science, who is working to correct what he sees as the temporarily wayward path of psychology. Currently, psychology is facing what some are calling a replication crisis. Much of the most headline-producing research in the last 20 years isn't standing up to attempts to reproduce its findings. Nosek wants to clean up the processes that have lead to this situation, and in this episode, you'll learn how. - Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com - Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart SPONSORS • The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart • Squarespace: www.squarespace.com | Offer Code = sosmart

Jan 10 2019
49 mins
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StarTalk Radio: The Rise of Self-Driving Cars

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Neil deGrasse Tyson investigates the fast-rising world of self-driving cars with former VP of R&D at GM and Mobility Consultant for Google, Inc. Larry Burns, Wired magazine transportation editor Alex Davies, and comic co-host Chuck Nice. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Find out more at https://www.startalkradio.net/startalk-all-access/

Jan 10 2019
49 mins
Play

99% Invisible: 186- War and Pizza

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Households tend to take pantry food for granted, but canned beans, powered cheese, and bags of moist cookies were not designed for everyday convenience. These standard products were made to meet the needs of the military. Reporter Tina Antolini, host … Continue reading →

Jan 10 2019
16 mins
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Science Vs: Antidepressants

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There’s an intriguing body of research that suggests the power of antidepressants doesn’t come from chemicals in the drugs, but from the power of placebo. Not everyone agrees, though. We speak to researchers and medical professionals on either side of the debate, and some wedged in-between -- Prof. Peter Kramer, psychiatrist and author of Ordinarily Well: the Case for Antidepressants; Prof. Irving Kirsch, psychologist and author of The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth; psychiatrist and radiologist Prof. Helen Mayberg; and psychiatrist Prof. Gregory Simon.Crisis Hotlines:US National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (2755)US Crisis Text Line Text “GO” to 741741Australian Lifeline 13 11 14Canadian Association for Suicide PreventionOur SponsorsCasper - Get $50 towards any mattress by visiting casper.com/sciencevs and use the promo code SCIENCEVSThird Love - Go to thirdlove.com/sciencevs to start your free trialWealthsimple – Investing made easy. Get your first $10,000 managed for free.CreditsThis episode has been produced by Heather Rogers, Shruti Ravindran, and Diane Wu. Our senior producer is Kaitlyn Sawrey. Edited by Annie-Rose Strasser and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Michelle Harris. Sound design and music production by Matthew Boll, mixed by Martin Peralta and Matthew Boll. Music written by Bobby Lord and Martin Peralta.Selected References2008 study suggesting that antidepressants are not much better than placebo for people suffering in severe depression.2016 study suggesting that antidepressants were way better than placebo in treating people suffering from severe depression. 2016 study on how drug companies under-report side effects in clinical trials. 2003 round-up of the most common side-effects of antidepressants. 2013 study which uses brain imaging to try to pinpoint whether patients would respond better to medication or psychotherapy. 

Jan 10 2019
41 mins
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You Are Not So Smart: 122 - Tribal Psychology

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The evidence is clear that humans value being good members of their tribes much more than they value being correct. We will choose to be wrong if it keeps us in good standing with our peers. In this episode, we explore how that affects politics and science communication, and how it is driving our growing partisan divide.

Jan 10 2019
1 hour 8 mins
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Stuff You Should Know: SYSK Selects: Is brain size related to intelligence?

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The idea that the larger the brain, the higher the intelligence is an old one, but it's pretty much utterly false. Modern investigation into how the brain works suggests there's a lot more to take into account when comparing brain biology to intellect.

Jan 10 2019
37 mins
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Twenty Thousand Hertz: #18 | Evolution of Accents

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When you describe yourself to others you might mention your height, hairstyle, or maybe your build. But one of the most telling things about you is something you can’t even see, yet it defines you more than you realize. Your accent tells others where you’re from, who you identify with, and maybe even where you’re going. How did accents evolve and why are American accents so different from British accents? Featuring Hollywood Dialect Coach Erik Singer and Linguistics Professor Dr. Walt Wolfram.Twenty Thousand Hertz is hosted by Dallas Taylor and produced out of the studios of Defacto Sound.Consider supporting the show at donate.20k.orgEpisode transcript, music, and credits can be found here.

Jan 10 2019
23 mins
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Flash Forward: Extra! Extra!

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This week we travel to a future where there is so much fake news that nobody can tell what is real anymore. Are we already there? What happens next?

Jan 10 2019
31 mins
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99% Invisible: 314- Interrobang

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In the spring of 1962, an ad man named Martin Speckter was thinking about advertising when he realized something: many ads asked questions, but not just any questions -- excited and exclamatory questions -- a trend not unique to his time. Got milk?! Where's the beef?! Can you hear me now?! So he asked himself: could there be a mark that made it clear (visually on a page) that something is both a question and an exclamation?! Speckter was also the editor of the typography magazine *TYPEtalks, *so  in March of 1962, in an article for the magazine titled “Making a New Point, Or How About That…”, Speckter proposed the first new mark of English language punctuation in 300 years: the interrobang. Plus, we revisit the story of another special character, the octothorpe. Interrobang

Jan 10 2019
32 mins
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Science Vs: Vegans: Are They Right?

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Do vegans have a right to be so smug? This week we find out whether it really is better for the environment, and our bodies, to go vegan. We speak to environmental researcher Joseph Poore, historian Prof. Connie Hilliard, anthropologist Prof. Katharine Milton, and nutrition researcher Prof. Roman Pawlak.Check out the transcript right here. Selected references: Joseph’s study comparing 40,000 different farmsConnie’s paper comparing countries that consume more or less dairyA big review of calcium intake and fracture riskThis report on the influence of the dairy industryKatie’s paper on the evolution of meat-eatingRoman’s work rounding up studies on a vitamin deficiencyCredits: This episode was produced by Rose Rimler with help from Wendy Zukerman, along with Meryl Horn and Odelia Rubin. Our senior producer is Kaitlyn Sawrey. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Michelle Harris. Mix and sound design by Emma Munger. Music by Emma Munger and Bobby Lord. Recording assistance from Robbie MacInnes, Paul Reece, Spencer Silva, and Hady Mawajdeh. For this episode we also spoke to Connie Weaver, Nathan H. Lents, Mark Bolland, Ambrish Mithal, Marco Springmann, Mary Beth Hall, Tara Garnett, Tom Sanders, Frederick Leroy, and others. Thank you so much for your help. And a big thanks to the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson. 

Jan 08 2019
30 mins
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99% Invisible: 269- Ways of Hearing

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When the tape started rolling in old analog recording studios, there was a feeling that musicians were about to capture a particular moment. On tape, there was no “undo.” They could try again, if they had the time and money, … Continue reading →

Jan 07 2019
37 mins
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