Cover image of STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye
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Business
Management

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

Updated 1 day ago

Business
Management
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Interviews with the best advertising, design, photographic, typographic, illustration and film directing talent that are still alive*. (*It's just easier.)

Read more

Interviews with the best advertising, design, photographic, typographic, illustration and film directing talent that are still alive*. (*It's just easier.)

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iTunes Ratings

2 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
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0
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0
Cover image of STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

Updated 1 day ago

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Interviews with the best advertising, design, photographic, typographic, illustration and film directing talent that are still alive*. (*It's just easier.)

Rank #1: Richard Foster

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Read any article on good copywriting and you’ll find the same names appear. David Abbott and Tony Brignull usually battle for the top two slots, Tim Delaney and John Salmon fight it out for third place. But talk to writers about the same subject and another name appears; Richard Foster. Richard is the only one of the five who has worked under the other four. (He may well be the only writer to have worked under the four?) For a number of reasons, the other four are better known. Two have agencies named after them. They were all Creative Directors, (or Chief Creative Officers as we call them today). Each took on the title of Chairman. All four became President of D&AD. With those roles came P.R. Whereas Richard wrote. He wrote for everyone, from 14 year old girls (Lil-lets) to Captains of Industry (The Economist). He wrote for products from 1p up to £100k. He wrote ads that featured in 29 D&AD annuals. He wrote the best section in D&AD’s ‘THE COPY BOOK: How 32 of The World’s Best Advertising Writers Write Their Advertising’. We had a great chat, hope you enjoy it. Dx

Mar 06 2019

2hr 10mins

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Rank #2: Nick Gill.

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He’s never tried to become his own brand, hang out at the right clubs or promote himself. He doesn’t bounce from jury to jury, job to job or club to club. And you’ll never read his latest theory on marketing in the trade mags. Nick Gill is currently Chief Creative Officer of BBH, his third agency in 30 years. We had a great chat, hope you enjoy.

May 21 2019

1hr 30mins

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Rank #3: Tony Davidson.

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It’s weird, I only interview people whose work I really like, but whenever I lay their work out end-to-end, I’m always surprised at how much better it is than I’d remembered. It could be that there’s much more of it, the sheer consistency of it or that it appears better with the benefit of time and a bit of distance. All three are true of the work in this post. Tony does a good job of shining a light onto how he produced it, hope you enjoy it.

Apr 03 2019

3hr 18mins

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Rank #4: Tim Riley.

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Words. Boy, they’ve really fallen off their perch. They used to be so respected, as were the people who knew how to use them. They could breathe life into cold, dead facts, in their hands ‘our beer costs a lot’ could become ‘Reassuringly expensive’. Better and shorter. Writers would often burn the midnight oil in an effort to get the maximum meaning from the minimum word count. It’s odd, because people have never read more than they do today, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Google, emails, texts, not to forget books, magazines and the odd newspaper. In fact today, there’s no part of the communication process that doesn’t rely on words, including the deck that explains the communication process. But for some reason, the skill of using them effectively is no longer being taught or even valued. Tim Riley has been choosing his words carefully for three decades now, we had a great chat about his time using them at some the best agencies in London. Hope you enjoy it.

May 21 2019

2hr 6mins

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Rank #5: Ben Priest.

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The arc of most creative agencies tends to be very similar; start idealistic and creative, become less principled and duller over the years as the realities of finance, earn-outs and fatigue start to kick in. Adam & Eve are like the Benjamin Button of ad agencies. They started burdened by the financial realities due to a situation called ‘Sorrell’. Having come through the early sensible years they seem to grow more creative as each year goes by. They won no creative awards in their first year, they’ve won more than anyone else last year, they’re currently top of the Gunn Report, their 10th year. Ben Priest has overseen their creative journey. We had a great, very candid chat, hope you enjoy it.

Apr 03 2019

1hr 43mins

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Rank #6: Dave Hieatt.

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Since he quit advertising, Dave has had a big effect on it. First, with Howies. His mail order catalogues built up more than customer base, they built up a fan base. They were, and still are, traded on Ebay. Not for their clothing, for their vibe; that decent feel-good, smart, happy, moral life is for living, do the right thing voice. (Dave: Did I miss anything?) Their writing and ideas were ripped them off mercilessly by ad agencies, constantly being used as reference for tone of voice or stimulus for manifestos… or just used. One agency I used to work for copied and pasted one of Dave’s pieces to use as a manifesto for a pitch. They won, but lost it a few weeks later when client found his shiny, new manifesto in an old Howies catalogue. Howies was admired by the guys from Innocent, they visited Dave (and his wife Claire), for advice on setting up a business and building a brand. To me, that whole Innocent vibe, which was also copied and ripped off, was totally ‘inspired’ by Howies. I’m guessing they were also ‘inspired’ by Howies practice of printing random messages on their clothing, inside a pair of jeans you may stumble across ‘I stink, wash me’ or underneath the washing instructions on your t-shirt might be ‘Buy land, they’re not making it anymore’. Since he left Howies, Dave & Claire have continued to give ad agencies stimulus and reference material via the Do Lectures, Hiut Denim and Do Books. I had a great chat with Dave, hope you enjoy it.

Feb 16 2019

1hr 37mins

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Rank #7: Gerry Graf.

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The best ads appear effortless. As if created accidentally, the result of a chance corridor meeting by people letting off steam on their way to different, grown-up, serious meetings, probably ones involving charts, numbers and mashed-up new words they get the gist of but aren’t 100% confident of their meaning. The truth is that it’s hard to create work like that, it’s like catching lightning in a bottle. A few creatives have been in the right place at the right time to grab a bolt, barely any catch it on demand. Gerry has been doing it on a regular basis for the last twenty years. Just as impressive; he’s a gooner. We had a great chat, hope you enjoy it.

Feb 17 2019

2hr 16mins

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Rank #8: Chris Palmer (Pt. 1: Advertising)

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Chris Palmer. My 5th boss. His 1st job was as John Hegarty’s writer. He won 5 D&AD silvers in his first in his first year. Set up and agency in his 4th year. Become one the most in demand directors of the last 25 years. Launched, arguably, London’s No 1 production company over over the last two decades; Gorgeous. Also, Mark Denton says Chris can draw better than him. Annoying isn’t it? We had a great chat, hope you enjoy it.

May 21 2019

2hr 20mins

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Rank #9: Neil French.

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Former rent collector, bull-fighter, porn director, klacker salesman, Judas Priest manager, account man, copywriter, art director and Chief Creative Officer of Ogilvy Worldwide. Warning: Some areas of the recording may have been adversely effected by a Rioja. (See above for only known picture of Neil without a cigar.)

May 21 2019

1hr 6mins

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Rank #10: Mark Reddy.

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‘Art Director’ is an unhelpful title. It has nothing to do with Art and very little to do with directing. Some think it’s about making stuff look cool, I think it’s about communicating at speed. We work in a medium people are actively trying to ignore, so we can’t hang around. Art Director’s can only communicate quickly if the understand: a) Their basic toolkit; photography, film, illustration, editing, cropping, fonts, colours and the rest. b) The world around them: how humans behave, the meaning of gestures, what’s fashionable, what’s unfashionable, the difference between someone looking excited and crazed, whether to it’s funnier to cast the tall skinny guy or the short fat guy, whether it would be more dramatic to fill the frame with sea and have a thin strip of sky or vice-versa? I don’t know an Art Director who understands both better than Mark Reddy.

Apr 03 2019

1hr 46mins

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