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JNIS podcast

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The Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) is a leading peer review journal for scientific research and literature pertaining to the field of neurointerventional surgery. The journal launch follows growing professional interest in neurointerventional techniques for the treatment of a range of neurological and vascular problems including stroke, aneurysms, brain tumors, and spinal compression.The journal is owned by SNIS and is also the official journal of the Interventional Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology (ANZSNR), The Hong Kong Neurological Society (HKNS) and the Neuroradiological Society of Taiwan.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

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The Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) is a leading peer review journal for scientific research and literature pertaining to the field of neurointerventional surgery. The journal launch follows growing professional interest in neurointerventional techniques for the treatment of a range of neurological and vascular problems including stroke, aneurysms, brain tumors, and spinal compression.The journal is owned by SNIS and is also the official journal of the Interventional Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology (ANZSNR), The Hong Kong Neurological Society (HKNS) and the Neuroradiological Society of Taiwan.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

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Excellent podcast

By ManuelFortes - Jul 22 2018
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Thank you for the initiative. These and the webinars are excellent.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0

Excellent podcast

By ManuelFortes - Jul 22 2018
Read more
Thank you for the initiative. These and the webinars are excellent.

The Best Episodes of:

Cover image of JNIS podcast

JNIS podcast

Updated 2 days ago

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The Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) is a leading peer review journal for scientific research and literature pertaining to the field of neurointerventional surgery. The journal launch follows growing professional interest in neurointerventional techniques for the treatment of a range of neurological and vascular problems including stroke, aneurysms, brain tumors, and spinal compression.The journal is owned by SNIS and is also the official journal of the Interventional Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology (ANZSNR), The Hong Kong Neurological Society (HKNS) and the Neuroradiological Society of Taiwan.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Rank #1: M2 occlusions patients may benefit from endovascular therapy

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M2 occlusions can present with serious neurological deficits, resulting in large infarcts and significant morbidity and mortality. The paper discussed in this podcast concludes that patients with M2 occlusions and higher baseline deficits (NIHSS score ≥9) may benefit from endovascular therapy, thus potentially expanding the category of acute ischemic strokes amenable to intervention.

Listen to the conversation between the Editor-in-Chief of JNIS, Felipe de Albuquerque, and Ansaar Rai (Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, West Virginia University Hospital, USA), who is the co-author of “A population-based incidence of M2 strokes indicates potential expansion of large vessel occlusions amenable to endovascular therapy”. Read the Editor’s Choice paper of June 2018 on the JNIS website: jnis.bmj.com/content/10/6/510.

May 29 2018

17mins

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Rank #2: Current endovascular strategies for cerebral venous thrombosis

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The recommendations of the report of the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery (SNIS) Standards and Guidelines Committee for endovascular strategies for cerebral venous thrombosis are discussed in this podcast. Editor-in-Chief of JNIS, Felipe de Albuquerque, talks to Justin Fraser (Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA) on behalf of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

Read the paper on the JNIS website: https://jnis.bmj.com/content/10/8/803

Jul 19 2018

13mins

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Rank #3: AVM angioarchitecture and hemorrhagic presentation in children with cerebral AVMs

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JNIS editor Rob Tarr talks to Darren Orbach, Department of Neurointerventional Radiology, Children's Hospital Boston, about his recent editor's choice paper: Angioarchitectural features associated with hemorrhagic presentation in pediatric cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

Apr 25 2013

19mins

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Rank #4: Too good to intervene? Thrombectomy for large vessel occlusion strokes with minimal symptoms

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In this podcast, the Editor-in-Chief of JNIS Felipe Albuquerque speaks to Raul Nogueira (Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine/Marcus Stroke & Neuroscience Center, Atlanta, Georgia, USA).
He is the co-author of the study "Too good to intervene? Thrombectomy for large vessel occlusion strokes with minimal symptoms: an intention-to-treat analysis".
Read the full paper published in the October 2017 issue of the journal also on the JNIS website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2016-012633.

The second article mentioned in this podcast, "Thrombectomy versus medical management for large vessel occlusion strokes with minimal symptoms: an analysis from STOPStroke and GESTOR cohorts", can be found here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2017-013243.

Oct 20 2017

22mins

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Rank #5: Implications of limiting mechanical thrombectomy to patients with ELVO meeting top tier evidence

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The impact of recent guidelines for endovascular management of emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) awarding top tier evidence to the same selective criteria in recent trials is discussed in this podcast.

The Editor-in-Chief of JNIS Felipe Albuquerque talks to the two main authors of the study, "Implications of limiting mechanical thrombectomy to patients with emergent large vessel occlusion meeting top tier evidence criteria". Rohini Bhole and Adam Arthur (University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center) explain how guideline adherence impacted treatment numbers and outcomes in a cohort of patients from a comprehensive stroke centre.

Read the full paper: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/9/3/225.

Mar 23 2017

18mins

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Rank #6: Analysis of vertebral augmentation practice patterns update. The farewell to JNIS editor Robert Tarr

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In this farewell podcast of the JNIS Editor-in-Chief, Robert Tarr talks vertebral augmentation practice with Associate Editor Joshua Hirsch and Ronil Chandra.

Dr J A Hirsch, from the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA, and Dr R V Chandra, from the Interventional Neuroradiology Service, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, are the leading authors of the study "Analysis of vertebral augmentation practice patterns: A 2016 update", published in the December 2016 print edition of JNIS.

Read the full article here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/12/1299.

Jan 03 2017

18mins

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Rank #7: Type of general anesthesia effects on endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke

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In this podcast, Andrew Kofke, from the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care and Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, reveals the details of his JNIS Editor's Choice paper published in the November 2016 issue.

The study concludes that anesthetic techniques and associated physiology used in endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke (EMAIS) are not homogeneous, making any statements about the effects of generic general anesthesia in stroke ambiguous.
In "Anesthetic variation and potential impact of anesthetics used during endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke" the authors also conclude that the type of general anesthesia may affect the outcome after EMAIS.

Read the full details here:

http://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2015/11/27/neurintsurg-2015-011998.full.pdf.

Oct 27 2016

14mins

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Rank #8: Long term experience using the ADAPT technique for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

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The direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been introduced as a simple and fast method for achieving good angiographic and clinical outcomes using large bore aspiration catheters for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). A study recently published in JNIS by Dr Turk et al. conclude that ADAPT is an effective method to achieve good clinical and angiographic outcomes, and serves as a useful firstline method for revascularization.
In this podcast, The Editor-in-Chief of JNIS Felipe Albuquerque and Aquilla Turk discuss the details of this single center's long term experience with ADAPT. The paper “Long term experience using the ADAPT technique for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke” can be found on the JNIS website (http://jnis.bmj.com/content/9/5/437) and on the May 2017's edition of the journal.

Read the other study mentioned in this podcast, "The ‘pit-crew’ model for improving door-to-needle times in endovascular stroke therapy: a Six-Sigma project", here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/5/447.

May 08 2017

14mins

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Rank #9: Posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous malformations are more prone to feeder vessel aneurysms

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In this podcast, the Editor-in-Chief of JNIS, Robert Tarr, is joined by Ali Alaraj, the corresponding author of the study, "Increased prevalence and rupture status of feeder vessel aneurysms in posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations".

Dr Alaraj, from the Department of Neurosurgery, Neuropsychiatric Institute University of Illinois, Chicago, USA, explains why are posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) more prone to developing associated aneurysms, specifically feeder vessel aneurysms. Feeder vessel aneurysms are more likely to be the source of hemorrhage in the posterior fossa. As such, they may be the most appropriate targets for initial and prompt control by embolization or surgery due to their elevated threat.

Read the full paper here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/10/1021.full.

Oct 04 2016

10mins

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Rank #10: MACRA 2.0

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In this podcast about the healthcare policy, Associate Editor of JNIS and Chair of the SNIS Health Care policy and Economic committee Josh Hirsch is joined by co-authors Andrew Rosenkrantz, from the Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, and by Gregory Nicola, from the Hackensack Radiology Group, to discuss MACRA Quality Payment Program episodic care payments, costs of care and implications to neurointerventional specialists.

In times of change in the American Administration, the group reflects on what elements of the MACRA/QPP will remain and which might change or even disappear.

Read the related articles:
http://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2016/12/01/neurintsurg-2016-012885

http://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2016/11/24/neurintsurg-2016-012845

Jan 25 2017

33mins

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Rank #11: Predictors of false-positive stroke thrombectomy transfers

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Diagnosing with clinical scales or imaging? The transfer decision process of patients with large vessel occlusion (LVO) stroke to receive thrombectomy is discussed in this podcast.
The Editor-in-Chief of JNIS Felipe Albuquerque speaks to Michael Chen (Department of Neurological Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, USA) about his co-authored study ‘Predictors of false-positive stroke thrombectomy transfers’, published in the September 2017’s issue of the JNIS.

Read the full paper on the journal's website: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/9/9/834.

Aug 30 2017

16mins

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Rank #12: Favorable revascularization therapy in patient with ASPECTS ≤5 in anterior circulation infarct

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A low baseline Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is strongly associated with low rates of favorable outcome in patients with acute stroke. The study discussed in this podcast evaluated the efficacy and safety of revascularization therapy in patient with ASPECTS ≤5 in anterior circulation infarct, concluding that revascularization therapy contributed to a favorable clinical outcome at 90 days, especially in patients younger than 70 years.
The Editor-in-Chief of JNIS Felipe Albuquerque is joined by Vincent Costalat (Department of Neuroradiology, CHRU Gui de Chauliac, Montpellier, France), who co-authored the paper: "Favorable revascularization therapy in patients with ASPECTS ≤ 5 on DWI in anterior circulation stroke".

Read the full details of this article published in the January 2018 issue of JNIS here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/10/1/5.

Jan 24 2018

19mins

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Rank #13: The low-profile visualized intraluminal support device use on wide-necked intracranial aneurysms

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In this podcast, the Editor-in-Chief of JNIS, Robert Tarr, is joined by David Fiorella, the corresponding author of the study, "Final results of the US humanitarian device exemption study of the low-profile visualized intraluminal support (LVIS) device".

Dr Fiorella, from the Department of Neurological Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, New York, concludes that the LVIS device facilitates coil embolization of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms with high rates of technical success. The process also granted an excellent safety profile, and very high rates of complete and near-complete occlusion at follow-up.

Read the full paper here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2015/09/21/neurintsurg-2015-011937.full

Sep 06 2016

6mins

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Rank #14: Decreasing procedure times with a standardized approach to ELVO cases. Welcoming JNIS new editor

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In this introductory podcast of Felipe Albuquerque, the new Editor-in-Chief of JNIS talks with Ryan McTaggart, who co-authored the study, "Decreasing procedure times with a standardized approach to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) cases".

The study was run at the single comprehensive stroke center at the Rhode Island Hospital and concluded that a standardized approach to the equipment used and process for ELVO cases at a single institution can dramatically reduce procedure times.

Read the full paper at the JNIS website: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/9/1/2.

Jan 05 2017

12mins

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Rank #15: Editorial: In defence of “our” stroke patients

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JNIS Associate Editor Joshua Hirsch is joined by Shazam Hussain (Cerebrovascular Center, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USA) and David Fiorella (Department of Neurosurgery, Stony Brook University, New York, USA) to discuss the June 2017's editorial in the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery.

In this commentary, they analyse the conclusions of the study “Public Health Urgency Created by the Success of Mechanical Thrombectomy Studies in Stroke”, published by Circulation, stating that the opinions of Drs Hopkins and Holmes “lead to unwarranted conclusions that have dangerous implications for patient care”.

The authors of the JNIS editorial comment on three major points of controversy:
(1) a disregard for training, expertise, and experience in the management of a disease that may lead to death or disability when treating physicians do not have them;
(2) a misunderstanding of the fundamental underpinnings of stroke physiology and anatomy;
(3) a false association between a real problem (undeveloped systems of care) and a spurious assumption (ie, that there are not enough physicians trained to perform intracranial MT). We examine these concerns below.

The editorial “In defense of our patients” was written on behalf of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, the Cerebrovascular Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology.

Read the full article on the JNIS website: jnis.bmj.com/content/9/6/525.

Jun 05 2017

19mins

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Rank #16: Balloon guide catheter use in mechanical thrombectomy linked to clinical and angiographic outcomes

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The use of balloon guide catheters (BGCs) during mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke is associated with superior clinical and angiographic outcomes, concludes a systematic review and meta-analysis recently published by JNIS and discussed in this podcast.
Waleed Brinjikji (Departments of Radiology and Neurosurgery of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA) tells the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Felipe Albuquerque the details of his paper ‘Impact of balloon guide catheter on technical and clinical outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis’.

Read the Editor’s Choice of April 2018: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/10/4/335

Mar 21 2018

16mins

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Rank #17: GRAFT reduces potential flow diverter malapposition and occasional acute thrombus formation

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In this podcast, Dr Robert Tarr interviews Dr Matthew Gounis and Dr Ajit Puri on their latest study, "Grading of Regional Apposition after Flow-Diverter Treatment (GRAFT): a comparative evaluation of VasoCT and intravascular OCT".

GRAFT is a semi-automated image post-processing software, which uses intuitive two-dimensional representations of wall apposition from either high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone-beam CT (VasoCT) or intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images.
The technique brings great prospects of reducing stroke-related complications when treating intracranial aneurysms. It delivers quantitative and visually convenient representations of potential flow diverter malapposition and occasional acute thrombus formation.

The paper, published on the August 2016 issue of JNIS, can be read here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/8/847.full.

Jul 14 2016

10mins

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Rank #18: Arteriovenous malformation embocure score

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In this podcast, Dr Demetrius Lopes tells Robert Tarr, the Editor of JNIS, the details of the study "Arteriovenous malformation embocure score: AVMES".

Demetrius Lopes, a neuroendovascular surgeon at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, is the corresponding author of this study selected as Editor's choice for the July issue of JNIS, which is fully accessible here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/7/685.full

Jun 28 2016

14mins

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Rank #19: Three-dimensional printing of anatomically accurate patient specific intracranial aneurysm models

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In this podcast, the Editor of JNIS, Robert Tarr, talks to Christof Karmonik, from the Houston Methodist Research Institute, USA, about the details of the study "Three-dimensional printing of anatomically accurate patient specific intracranial aneurysm models".

The research concluded that the 3D printed aneurysm models were accurate and able to be produced inhouse. Read the full paper here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2015/04/10/neurintsurg-2015-011686.full

Jun 06 2016

13mins

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Rank #20: Endovascular Stroke Therapy: early emergency arrivals effects on collaterals, infarcts and outcomes

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In this podcast, Dr David Liebeskind, explains the details of the paper "Early arrival at the emergency department is associated with better collaterals, smaller established infarcts and better clinical outcomes with endovascular stroke therapy: SWIFT study".

Dr David Liebeskind, from the Neurovascular Imaging Research Core, UCLA Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, USA, is interviewed by Dr Robert Tarr, Editor-in-Chief of the JNIS.

Read the full article here: http://jnis.bmj.com/content/8/6/553.full

May 19 2016

14mins

Play