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Education

Campus Review Podcasts

Updated 3 days ago

Education
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Podcast by CampusReview

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Podcast by CampusReview

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Cover image of Campus Review Podcasts

Campus Review Podcasts

Updated 3 days ago

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Podcast by CampusReview

Issue of the week 1 | Should all university funding be accepted?

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Guilt by association has always been a vexed issue, but in the era of #metoo and corporate and social responsibility, careers can disappear overnight, lives can be destroyed, and reputations can be irrevocably damaged.

That might be the situation facing a teacher at MIT in the US, whose students are calling for him to be fired due to his ties with convicted sex offender Jeffery Epstein.

Seth Lloyd, a professor of mechanical engineering at the university, met with Epstein during the sex offender’s time in jail and received funding from Epstein’s foundation. This is despite the fact that the billionaire financier was jailed in 2008 for having for soliciting an underage prostitute and arrested again this year for the alleged sex trafficking of minors from 2002 and 2005.

Nov 11 2019

2mins

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Cr News Of The Week | Which degrees will guarantee work?

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Hi, I’m Wade Zaglas, education editor for Campus Review. Once upon a time, having a degree – yes, any degree – was seen as a guarantee to getting into the workforce and eventually working up the ranks.

But a new report commissioned by Graduate Careers Australia, entitled The future work for Australian graduates, concluded that while having a degree still made your job prospects better, industry-related degrees that were in high demand not too long like maths and science-based degrees aren’t as sought after anymore.

A key reason why jobs for science grads were no longer guaranteed or likely is due to less funding being available for public science research, news.com.au reported.

For example, biology graduates now have a 15 per cent lower chance of gaining a full-time job than the general population.

In a harbinger of what’s likely to come, last year roughly a third of all jobs required at bachelor’s degree as a minimum. According to the Graduate Careers Australia report, roughly 800,000 jobs over the next decade across the country will require a degree.

The same report highlighted that, four months after graduating in 2018, teaching and medicine graduates were enjoying the best employment rates. Nearly 100 per cent of medicine graduates secured full-time positions four months after graduating, while 83 per cent of teachers also enjoyed high rates of full employment shortly after graduating.

Oct 25 2019

2mins

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Issue Of The Week | Women dominate the PM's science awards

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This week we celebrated the Prime Minister’s Award for Science, an important time to acknowledge Australian scientific work that has promising applications or has changed the world. And this year, women took out the majority of the awards.

This year’s prestigious award went to University of Western Australia’ emeritus professor of mathematics Cheryl Praeger, whose four decades of research on fundamental mathematics and algorithms has contributed to a lot of the technology we enjoy in modern life such as encryption messaging, internet banking, and search engines.

Another notable female winner this year was Dr Elizabeth New, who won the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year and has been a colleague of Praeger’s for a long time. New was awarded the prize for creating fluorescent molecules that illuminate the chemistry of diseased cells.

Listen to the podcast for a full run down of the awards.

Oct 18 2019

2mins

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Sara James | The ATAR issue and factors influencing students course choices

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Dr Sara James is a lecturer and cultural sociologist at La Trobe University in Melbourne. She has completed research on the factors that influence students' degree and course choices choices. As James' work has found, one of the key factors influencing course choices are the opinions of families and friends.

James is also interested in the changing nature of work in the future, leading to a new age of automation, lifelong learning and "micro-accreditation" through short courses like LinkedIn Learning.

For James, the shame about ATAR is that is discourages students from enrolling in subjects they really enjoy or are good at. Instead, students are encouraged to "maximise their ATAR - or in other words - "spend their score" by securing a high-paying job in the future.

But as anecdotal and research findings suggest, ATAR-driven choices often lead to students pulling out of courses or switching over to ones they find more interesting or are more talented at. This podcast is particularly timely given NSW's decision to overhaul ATAR.

Oct 17 2019

12mins

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News just in | Murdoch launches counter-claims against whistelblower

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The Four Corners Cash Cows programs, which aired in May, caused a scandal throughout Australia's higher education sector. The program focussed on how many universities were treating international students as proverbial "cash cows" and were waiving or simplifying English language requirements to maximise international student numbers and revenue.

Now, Murdoch University has decided to launch a counter-claim against one of the whistleblowers who spoke out on the program: Associate Proferssor Gerd Schroder-Turk. The university claims that Schroder-Turk's comments in the program breached his "fiduciary duties" in revealing particular information to journalists and allege reputational damage to the university has resulted.

Schroder-Turk's claim, which related to him being dismissed from his senate position, and the university's counter-claim are expected to inform "an important test case", one law professor argues. Listen to the podcast for full details.

Oct 11 2019

3mins

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News | Ramsay Centre rejects USYD Offer

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The Chief Executive of Ramsay Centre Professor Haines has rejected The University of Sydney's latest proposal to modify the Centre's Western Civilisation degree.

In a letter sent to USYD's Vice-Chancellor Dr Michael Spence on Thursday, Haines wrote that the Ramsay board - comprising former prime ministers John Howard and Tony Abbott - was unanimous in its decision to reject Spence's modified program. Listen to the podcast for more detail on the decision.

Oct 04 2019

2mins

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This week's big issue | Ridd prepares for JCU appeal

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After marine physicist Peter Ridd was originally awarded $1.2 million in the Federal Circuit Court for unfair dismissal, James Cook University is appealing the decision, preparing to take it all the to the High Court of Australia. Ridd has set up GoFundMe page to assist with legal fees but admits the whole process has taken a toll on him.

Sep 27 2019

2mins

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Wade Zaglas | Gender Equality Soapbox

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Should a woman wish to study an undergraduate degree in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology at the University of Technology Sydney, she would see her ATAR score suddenly jump 10 points. Education editor Wade Zaglas looks at both sides of the issue.

Aug 30 2019

4mins

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Chris Strods | How unis can talk better to prospects

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How can higher education institutions market themselves better to prospects? What kind of things is the average student hopeful looking for in their university of choice, and where are they getting their information? These were the kinds of questions a new QSES Domestic Student Survey wanted to ask. Chris Strods, QSES Market Research and Data Manager, joins the program.

Aug 19 2019

10mins

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Anastasia Glushko | Making uni a choice for foster kids

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Of the 48,700 Australian kids in out of home care, less than 3% will go on to attend university – far below the national average. Anastasia Glushko, who became a foster kid at 12 and later an Oxford graduate, wants this to change. Founding the Why Not You project in 2016, she's working with universities to make higher education an accessible option for people like her.

Jul 29 2019

34mins

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