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Society & Culture

American Academy of Religion

Updated 9 days ago

Society & Culture
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The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

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The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

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iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Cover image of American Academy of Religion

American Academy of Religion

Updated 9 days ago

Read more

The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

Rank #1: "Goddess and God in the World": An Embodied Theological Conversation

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Taking off from their new book, Goddess and God in the World: Conversations in Embodied Theology (Fortress, 2016), Carol P. Christ and Judith Plaskow introduce their embodied theological method and explore their theological differences: Is Goddess a personal presence who cares about the world? Or is God an impersonal creative energy equally supportive of good and evil? Mary E. Hunt will moderate a conversation that includes Monica Coleman, Aysha Hidayatullah, Miranda Shaw, and Julia Watts-Belser, who will speak from Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish, and Goddess perspectives. The panelists respond to the book, especially to its method, but also discuss their own theological positions, reflecting on what theological perspectives best make sense of and promote the flourishing of our common world.
Sep 21 2017
2 hours 5 mins
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Rank #2: Populism through the Lens of Religion and Race

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This discussion explores the impact of religion and race on American populism across the ideological spectrum. Papers explore the interplay of religious and secular forces on the #BlackLivesMatter movement, including a theological exploration of the death of Michael Brown and an examination of how Millennial activists are blurring secular/religious boundaries. The session juxtaposes these topics with examinations of white conservative populist expressions. Papers explore populist elements within the Southern Baptist Convention that laid the foundation for white evangelicals to throw their support behind Donald Trump and among Tea Party women whose rhetoric centered around a vision of white Christianity fighting the legality of abortion.

Robert P. Jones, Public Religion Research Institute, presiding

Papers:
- "The Reproductive Politics of Evangelical Tea Party Women and the Afterbirth of Trump’s America"
Larycia Hawkins, University of Virginia

- "Populism in the Southern Baptist Convention"
Adam Hankins, DePaul University

- "Critical Complexities: Religious-Secularity or Secular-Religiosity, and #BlackLivesMatter"
Seth Gaiters, Ohio State University

- "Seeing Jesus in Michael Brown: Theological Protest as the Performance of Purity in the Black Lives Matter Movement"
Rima Vesely-Flad, Warren Wilson College

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 18, in Boston, Massachusetts.
May 24 2018
1 hour 50 mins
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Rank #3: 2016 Plenary Address: Michelle Alexander with Kelly Brown Douglas

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Michelle Alexander is a highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, and legal scholar. Alexander is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and Stanford Law School. Following law school, she clerked for Justice Harry A. Blackmun on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Chief Judge Abner Mikva on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. Prior to entering academia, Alexander served as the director of the Racial Justice Project for the ACLU of Northern California, where she coordinated the Project’s media advocacy, grassroots organizing, coalition building, and litigation. The Project’s priority areas were educational equity and criminal justice reform, and it was during those years at the ACLU that she began to awaken to the reality that our nation’s criminal justice system functions more like a caste system than a system of crime prevention or control. She became passionate about exposing and challenging racial bias in the criminal justice system, ultimately launching and leading a major campaign against racial profiling by law enforcement known as the “DWB Campaign” or “Driving While Black or Brown Campaign.” In addition to her nonprofit advocacy experience, Alexander has worked as a litigator at private law firms including Saperstein, Goldstein, Demchak & Baller, in Oakland, California, where she specialized in plaintiff-side class-action lawsuits alleging race and gender discrimination. In 2005, she won a Soros Justice Fellowship, which supported the writing of "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness" (The New Press, 2012), and that same year she accepted a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University. She currently devotes much of her time to freelance writing; public speaking; consulting with advocacy organizations committed to ending mass incarceration; and, most important, raising her three young children—the most challenging and rewarding job of all.

In this plenary address from the 2016 AAR Annual Meeting, Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas (Goucher College) interviews Alexander, and the women converse in turn about racial (in)justice, the election, and religion's role in U.S. politics.

The session is introduced by 2016 AAR president, Serene Jones.

This plenary was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, on November 20.
Aug 03 2017
1 hour
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Rank #4: Another Plan “A”: Religious Studies and Careers Beyond the Academy

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Worried about the job market? Thinking that a career in higher ed no longer matches your interests and goals? Or just wondering about options? The American Academy of Religion's Applied Religious Studies Committee hosts a discussion on career paths outside the academy.

Panelists discuss fields including: publishing and editing, freelance writing, nonprofits and foundations, government, religious communities, academic administration, and more; and current PhD candidates talk about their own experiences of exploring nonacademic career options in the context of their graduate studies.

Panelists also explore the ways faculty, departments, and the AAR might better support scholars as they consider careers beyond the academy.

Cristine Hutchison-Jones, Administrative Director, Petrie-Flom Center of Harvard Law School, presiding

Panelists:
- Jason Blakeburn, PhD candidate, McGill University
- Regina Walton, Pastor and Rector of Grace Episcopal Church in Newton (MA)and Counselor to Episcopal/Anglican Students Harvard University
- Emily Mace, Chicago Digital Humanities Coordinator, Lake Forest College
- Robert P. Jones, CEO, Public Religion Research Institute

This roundtable and Q&A was held at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Boston, Massachusetts, on November 18.
Apr 12 2018
1 hour 59 mins
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Rank #5: Existentialism, Authenticity, and Asceticism with Noreen Khawaja

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Noreen Khawaja talks to Religious Studies News about her book "The Religion of Existence: Asceticism in Philosophy from Kierkegaard to Sartre" (University of Chicago Press), which won the American Academy of Religion’s 2017 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Constructive-Reflective Studies.

Music is Dexter Britain, “Fresh Monday” (www.dexterbritain.co.uk)
Feb 15 2018
27 mins
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Rank #6: Recolonizing the Academy Under a Trump Presidency

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This panel analyzes the intensified colonization of academic spaces—both intellectual and physical—under the current presidency. How do we accurately map these changes and negotiate these spaces in an era of national “whitelash” from peripheral ideological and embodied spaces? How do we contend with the increasing marginalization and targeting of vulnerable populations? What strategies might scholars use to contribute to the ongoing process of decolonizing the academy? What are the potential ramifications of our non-action or complicity in this academic landscape?

Munir Jiwa, Graduate Theological Union, presiding

Panelists:
- Hatem Bazian, Zaytuna College and University of California, Berkeley
- Jasmin Zine, Wilfrid Laurier University
- Mel Chen, University of California, Berkeley
- Shanell T. Smith, Hartford Seminary

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 19 in Boston, MA.
Apr 19 2018
1 hour 32 mins
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Rank #7: Faculty Members on Preparing Scholars of Religion for Non-academic Careers

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In recent years as the job market for tenure-track academic positions has tightened and the use of contingent faculty has exploded, increasing numbers of graduate degree seekers are intending to pursue nonacademic careers. While some areas of study present obvious nonacademic options, for scholars in the humanities, nonacademic career opportunities and the best preparation for them may not be obvious and religious studies faculty are exploring how graduate programs can - and should - prepare all alumni for multiple employment outcomes. This panel brings together faculty members from a variety of institutions to discuss some of the problems confronting their students and their programs as more people turn - by necessity and by choice - to nonacademic career paths.

Cristine Hutchison-Jones, Harvard Law School, Presiding

Panelists:
- Molly Bassett, Georgia State University
- Jason C. Bivins, North Carolina State University
- Kathleen Moore, University of California, Santa Barbara

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Boston, Massachusetts, on November 19.
Jun 14 2018
1 hour 23 mins
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Rank #8: Kyle Harper, From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity

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Kyle Harper talks to Religious Studies News about his book From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity (Harvard University Press), which won the American Academy of Religion’s 2014 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Historical Studies.

Music is Dexter Britain, "Fresh Monday"(www.dexterbritain.co.uk)
Apr 05 2015
26 mins
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Rank #9: Religion, Immigration, and Politics: North American and European Perspectives

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AM 2016: This panel provides some comparative insights on the current situation in Europe alongside experiences in the USA, exploring how religion is located within these debates, for instance as a foundation for appeals to national or civilizational identities that exclude certain groups, as well as a means for overcoming conflict and providing support and advocacy for vulnerable immigrant communities. What are the implications of defining refugees/immigrants in terms of their faith and ethnicity, including the ways in which this can fuel negative stereotypes? And how do we make sense of the ambiguous response of Christian churches/Christianity in both the USA and Europe in addressing issues around immigration? The panelists address these questions and others through comparative insights drawing upon the social and political sciences, as well as theological approaches.

Panelists:
- Emma Tomalin, University of Leeds
- Atalia Omer, University of Notre Dame
- Daniel Groody, University of Notre Dame
- Jocelyne Cesari, Harvard University
- Erin Wilson, University of Groningen
- Victor Carmon, Oblate School of Theology

This panel session was recorded at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 21, in San Antonio, Texas.
Jul 27 2017
1 hour 58 mins
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Rank #10: Anna Sun, Confucianism as a World Religion: Contested Histories and Contemporary Realities

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Anna Sun talks to Religious Studies News about her book Confucianism as a World Religion: Contested Histories and Contemporary Realities (Princeton University Press), which won the American Academy of Religion’s 2014 Best First Book in the History of Religions award.

Music is Dexter Britain, "Fresh Monday"(www.dexterbritain.co.uk)
Feb 06 2015
25 mins
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Rank #11: Preparing Scholars of Religion for Nonacademic Careers: What’s a Faculty Member to Do? (2019)

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In recent years as the job market for tenure-track academic positions has tightened and the use of contingent faculty has exploded, increasing numbers of graduate degree seekers are intending to pursue nonacademic careers. While some areas of study present obvious nonacademic options, for scholars in the humanities, nonacademic career opportunities and the best preparation for them may not be obvious and religious studies faculty are exploring how graduate programs can — and should — prepare all alumni for multiple employment outcomes. This panel brings together faculty members from a variety of institutions to discuss some of the problems confronting their students and their programs as more people turn — by necessity and by choice — to nonacademic career paths.

Cristine Hutchison-Jones, Harvard University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Paul W. Harvey, University of Colorado - Colorado Springs
- Patrick Mason, Claremont Graduate University
- Nathan Schneider, University of Colorado
- Annette Stott, University of Denver

This session was recorded at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 19 in Denver, Colorado.
Mar 07 2019
1 hour 39 mins
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Rank #12: Black Liberation Theologies of Disability

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Building upon a 2015 conference on Black Liberation Theologies of Disability at Union Theological Seminary, organized by Kendrick Kemp, this session attempts to construct liberation theologies that take seriously the experiences of blackness and disability. Panelists explore the ways that racialized and disabled embodiment offers innovative readings of text, tradition, and theological frameworks. What resources for a black liberation theology of disability can be sourced from black religious traditions? From disability activism? From black protest movements? Can theology be more responsive to the presence of elders in black religious communities? How can theologies grapple with the disabling traumas, state and social violence, and the toll of activism in black experiences? How can black theologies support those living with mental health challenges, learning differences, and brain injuries? How do our theologies honor and celebrate black disabled bodies?

Panelists:
- Nyasha Junior, Temple University, presiding
- Monica A. Coleman, Claremont School of Theology
- Garth Kasimu Baker-Fletcher, Texas College
- Kendrick Kemp, Union Theological Seminary
- Pamela Lightsey, Boston University

This session was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 21, in San Antonio, Texas.
Sep 08 2017
2 hours 15 mins
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Rank #13: Conversion in America: A conversation with Lincoln Mullen

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Lincoln Mullen, author of "The Chance of Salvation: A History of Conversion in America," joins Kristian Petersen in a conversation about the spectrum of religious identity in American history and how the phenomena of conversion is an opening which allows scholars to study a variety of religious groups—and their relationships to each other.

Mullen is the winner of the 2018 Best First Book in the History of Religions.
Apr 18 2019
21 mins
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Rank #14: 2017 Marty Forum: Winnifred Fallers Sullivan

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Winnifred Fallers Sullivan is the recipient of the 2017 Martin E. Marty Award for the Public Understanding of Religion. Sullivan is professor and chair of religious studies, and affiliate professor of law, at Indiana University at Bloomington. Sullivan’s work focuses on the phenomenology of religion under the modern rule of law, and she is widely known for her critical studies of American law and jurisprudence about religion. She is the author of four books: Paying the Words Extra: Religious Discourse in the Supreme Court of the United States (1994), The Impossibility of Religious Freedom (2005), Prison Religion: Faith-based Reform and the Constitution (2009), and A Ministry of Presence: Chaplaincy, Spiritual Care, and the Law (2014); and the co-editor of three volumes: After Secular Law (2011), Varieties of Religious Establishment (2013), and The Politics of Religious Freedom (2015). Beyond the religious studies guild, Sullivan’s public scholarship on religion and her work as an expert witness have had an important impact in courtrooms, prisons, military units, and government offices from city halls to the State Department. In this year’s Marty Award Forum, Laurie Patton, president of Middlebury College, will join Sullivan for an extended public dialogue about Sullivan’s life and work.

Erik Owens, Boston College, presiding

Panelists:
- Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, Indiana University
- Laurie Louise Patton, Middlebury College

The forum was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 19 in Boston, Massachusetts.
Apr 26 2018
1 hour 18 mins
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Rank #15: Reformation and Reformations

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The Reformed Theology and History Group and the Martin Luther and the Global Lutheran Traditions Group host a joint panel on the meaning of 'Reformation' and what implications the notion of 'Reformation' or 'reformations' has for us today—theologically or ecclesially. Panelists explore the relevance of 'reformation/s' for the contemporary context, including ways in which aspects of the Protestant Reformation deserve retrieval, reframing, or retraction today.

Panelists:
- Amy Plantinga Pauw, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
- Kristen E. Kvam, Saint Paul School of Theology
- Cornelis van der Kooi, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
- Evangeline Anderson Rajkumar, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Kirsi Stjerna, Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, presiding

The panel was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 20 in Boston, Massachusetts.
Mar 15 2018
2 hours 33 mins
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Rank #16: Fatemeh Keshavarz: Unsilencing the Sacred – Poetic Conversations with the Divine

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AAR's 2016 American Lectureship in the History of Religions was held by Iranian academic and poet Fatemeh Keshavarz, who at this session at the 2016 AAR Annual Meeting, delivers her capstone lecture.

Born and raised in the city of Shiraz, completed her studies in Shiraz University, and University of London. She taught at Washington University in St. Louis for over twenty years where she chaired the Department of Asian and Near Eastern Languages and Literatures from 2004 to 2011. In 2012, Keshavarz joined the University of Maryland as Roshan Institute Chair in Persian Studies, and director of Roshan Institute for Persian Studies. Keshavarz is the author of award-winning books including "Reading Mystical Lyric: the Case of Jalal al-Din Rumi" (USC Press, 1998), "Recite in the Name of the Red Rose" (USC Press, 2006), and "Jasmine and
Stars: Reading more than 'Lolita' in Tehran"(UNC Press, 2007). She has also published other books and numerous journal articles. Keshavarz is a published poet in Persian and English and an activist for peace and justice. She was invited to speak at the UN General Assembly on the significance of cultural education. Her NPR show “The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi” brought her the Peabody Award in 2008. In the same year, she received the Herschel Walker Peace and Justice Award.

Keshavarz is introduced by Louis A. Ruprecht (Georgia State University) followed by Ebrahim E. I. Moosa (University of Notre Dame).

This session was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 20 in San Antonio, Texas.

Learn more about the American Lectures in the History of Religions at https://www.aarweb.org/programs-services/history-of-religions-lectures.
Jul 20 2017
1 hour 10 mins
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Rank #17: Writing Religion Online: Scholars and Journalists in Conversation (SBLAAR16)

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Over the past decade there has been an explosion of online religion writing. New publications continue to emerge and, with them, new kinds of writing and writers. There are more and more ways for scholars to share their expertise and knowledge with academic and popular audiences alike. At the same time, there are a growing number of journalists interested in covering religion well. Not only are these two fields growing, but they are starting to intersect and even blur. This conversation brings together scholars, journalists, and editors to talk about the present and future of online public writing about religion and to answer questions such as: “What does this work mean for the future of religious studies and for the thinking about religion beyond the academy?” and “How do we train scholars and journalists to get jobs and do them well?”

Panelists:
- Kali Handelman, Center for Religion and Media at New York University, presiding
- Brook Wilensky-Lanford, Killing the Buddha, Chapel Hill, NC
- Simran Jeet Singh, Trinity University
- Patrick Blanchfield, New York University

This discussion was recorded at the 2016 AAR Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX, on November 20.
Aug 24 2017
1 hour 29 mins
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Rank #18: Contingency Possibilities: Career Options within and beyond the Academy

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This joint panel explores ways in which contingency may be constructive (and the ways contingent faculty work can be made more humane and viable) as part of a larger discussion about non-tenure-track and “alt-ac” paths.

Lynne Gerber, Harvard University, Presding

Panelists:
- Simran Jeet Singh, New York University
- Megan Goodwin, Northeastern University
- Hussein Rashid, Barnard College
- Matthew Bingley, Georgia State University

The session was recorded on November 19, 2018 in Denver, Colorado, during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.
Mar 07 2019
2 hours 18 mins
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Rank #19: Willis Jenkins, The Future of Ethics: Sustainability, Social Justice, and Religious Creativity

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Willis Jenkins talks to Religious Studies News about his book The Future of Ethics: Sustainability, Social Justice, and Religious Creativity (Georgetown University Press), which won the American Academy of Religion’s 2014 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Constructive-Reflective Studies.

Music is Dexter Britain, "Fresh Monday"(www.dexterbritain.co.uk)
Feb 03 2015
24 mins
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Rank #20: Lena Salaymeh on Critiques and New Directions in Studying Islamic Legal Traditions

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Lena Salaymeh joins Religious Studies News to talk about her 2017 AAR award-winning book, "The Beginnings of Islamic Law: Late Antique Islamicate Legal Traditions."

Salaymeh is interviewed by Kristian Petersen. Her book won the 2017 Award for the Excellence in the Study of Religion in the textual studies category.
Apr 05 2018
24 mins
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