Cover image of You Bet Your Garden
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Sports & Recreation
Outdoor

You Bet Your Garden

Updated 10 days ago

Sports & Recreation
Outdoor
Read more

Mike McGrath hosts this call-in public radio program and offers light-hearted, organic gardening guidance.

Read more

Mike McGrath hosts this call-in public radio program and offers light-hearted, organic gardening guidance.

iTunes Ratings

236 Ratings
Average Ratings
198
19
11
4
4

iTunes Ratings

236 Ratings
Average Ratings
198
19
11
4
4
Cover image of You Bet Your Garden

You Bet Your Garden

Updated 10 days ago

Read more

Mike McGrath hosts this call-in public radio program and offers light-hearted, organic gardening guidance.

Rank #1: You Bet Your Garden Summer Special

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Radioactive roses; peerless pollinators; the famed “Banana of the North;” and puckering persimmons. On the next You Bet Your Garden, we gather some of our favorite interviews to cool down your summer with a wilder blend of topics than the ingredients in a Singapore Sling!

Jul 06 2018
48 mins
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Rank #2: Using Grass Clippings for Mulch

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Is it ever right to use your grass clippings as a garden mulch?? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, we’ll bend–but not break–the rules as Mike McGrath looks at the pros and cons of collecting those clips. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Question of the Week:

My son has been trying to make compost out of three large piles of grass contained by plastic fencing. With all the rain we’ve had, the piles have become wet, compacted, dense and very heavy. What can be done to make these piles more effective at breaking down? They have been turned, but we recently added a lot of grass—and that plus the rain has made things a compacted mess. I examined one pile today and it’s actually like “green manure”; you know, all soft and squishy. That should be really great for the garden…no?
—Elizabeth in North Plainfield, New Jersey

How Elizabeth can fix her compost »

Jul 27 2018
48 mins
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Rank #3: Beneficial Bugs? Or Filthy Flies?

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A listener wants to attract beneficial insects, but instead is beset by flies! On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath discusses how this might not be the worst thing to happen to an urban gardener. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Aug 03 2018
48 mins
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Rank #4: Do Trees NEED Mulch? & Can a Tree Survive Severed Roots?

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Do trees really NEED mulch? And can their roots be safely severed during construction? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath reveals some surprising truths about trees. Plus: Square Foot Gardening legend Mel Bartholomew, and your fabulous phone calls!

Question of the Week:

I’m about to put an addition on my house that will require a foundation being built approximately six to eight feet from a well-established maple tree that’s about 30 to 40 feet high. The builder says there’s a chance the tree will die when the roots are cut during trenching. Is there anything I can do to help increase the tree’s odds of survival?
—Mia in Yellow Springs, OH

Can Mia’s tree be saved?

Jun 01 2018
48 mins
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Rank #5: Keep Your Credit Cards Out of the Compost!

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A British gardening magazine recommends pouring grass clippings on top of shredded paper to make “quick compost.” On You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath reveals what’s wrong with this picture and re-iterates the rules of non-bogus black gold brewing. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Question of the Week:

I was just watching a “Florabest Lawnmower” video at the Facebook page for “The English Garden Magazine”; and the host used grass clippings and shredded paper ‘to make a quick compost’. I know you always recommend mulching grass back into the lawn, but there have been times when my grass grew so fast and tall that I needed to bag it. I only have two small trees, so there are no dried leaves for me to rake up in the fall and use. Is it okay to add shredded copier paper and credit card advertisements to my compost pile? I compost a lot of ‘green’ veggie waste and egg shells.
—Judy in New Jersey

Keep your credit cards out of the compost!

Jun 29 2018
46 mins
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Rank #6: In the Garden and on the Lawn, Cheaters Always Win

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Nobody wants to work hard outside. On the latest You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath reveals that cheaters always win—especially when they perfect the lawn care and pruning practices that minimize hard work in the summertime. Also, Jenny Rose Carey, senior director at the Philadelphia Horticultural Society’s Meadowbrook Farm, joins the show to talk about the perfect plants for shady spots. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Question of the Week:

You do a great job and I follow all your advice exactly (as long as it’s convenient and cheap). For example, I always cut my lawn at the advised time…as long as that happens to fall on a weekend and the kids aren’t keeping me too busy. For those not as committed as me, do you have any advice on how to…well…how to…cheat? Basically, the Cliff Notes version of garden care? For instance, how do I get rid of lawn weeds without harming the dog or the kids and do it quickly? And what if my wife tells me it’s time to trim a plant when the calendar disagrees? Calendars can’t make me sleep in the spare bedroom, my wife can.
—Chad in Gaithersburg, Maryland

How Chad can save time and energy while keeping his garden looking good »

Aug 24 2018
44 mins
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Rank #7: Getting the Most Out of Your Garlic

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Your garlic harvest is in…now what? Use it fresh before it sprouts? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath will expose the secret to getting a season of good seasoning from your harvest—or from the great garlic you’ll find at local farmer’s markets. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Aug 17 2018
44 mins
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Rank #8: Got Skeeters Bad? Call in the Dragonflies!

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Mosquito prevention time is over; now is the time to switch tactics to protection. On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath reveals how to attract dragonflies and explains why white is the color to wear this mosquito season. Plus, your fabulous phone calls!

Question of the Week:

I’m a 13-year-old boy and live with my grandparents on seven acres of land. We have a pond, but absolutely no dragonflies. We’re way out in the country, and you’d think we’d have plenty, but we have not seen any. It’s like they vanished. Is there any kind of smell or food we could use to attract them? We need them badly; I just counted thirty bites on my legs! Bug spray has been no help, so our only hope is dragonflies…
—Ethan in Brokaw, WI

How to attract dragonflies »

Aug 10 2018
48 mins
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Rank #9: Crossing The Pond with the Intent to Commit Horticulture

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It’s often a bad idea to take plants across state lines with the intent to commit horticulture. On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath discusses what’s at stake if you’re thinking of crossing The Pond with your plants! Plus, gardening for the curious with Dr. Lee Reich.

Question of the Week:

I teach high school German & Spanish and run a reciprocal group exchange program with a teacher in Munich, Bavaria. (Bavaria is to Germany like Texas is to the US—very big, very conservative, very interesting & a lot of fun.)

Because of my affinity for hydrangeas I came up with an idea I hope you will find interesting enough to help with. When I’m in Munich (the capital of Bavaria) later this July, I want to give my foreign exchange counterpart Veit (pronounced like “fight”) and his new wife Effi a hydrangea (specifically hydrangea macrophylla bavaria), and take cuttings from it home with me, so that after the cuttings take root, we will effectively be sharing the same hydrangea plant across two continents.

The root of the problem (pun intended 🙂 is that Google as I may, I can’t seem to find out who to ask about bringing those cuttings home, as I believe it is highly frowned upon to bring plants into the US without going through proper channels. If you could help me, I would be ever grateful—and invite you to one of my wife’s outstanding dinners during Veit’s next visit this fall. “Danke schön”.

PS: If you think the cuttings might not be viable after transatlantic flights, I could probably just buy two identical plants, which might be clones anyway.

—Chad in New Hanover Township, PA

The legality of globetrotting hydrangeas »

Jul 13 2018
44 mins
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Rank #10: You Bet Your Garden Summer Special #2

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Plants under glass, mushroom hunting, permaculture, and copper plugs. On this week’s You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath talks terrariums, ‘shrooming, piling stuff up on top of old wood and much more in a series of our favorite interviews.

Question of the Week:

I’ve been looking into the different design systems I could use in establishing a new organic garden and food forest fruit orchard. I’ve heard about permaculture, biodynamic, and biointensive, but I’m really confused: What’s the difference between these three? And finally, which do you think would give me the best view on how to design my new garden in a functional way for the long-term? Thanks.
Joe from Greenville, NC
What do Permaculture, Biodynamic & Biointensive mean? »

Jul 20 2018
46 mins
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