Custom Made

Rank #10 in Technology Podcasts
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Custom Made

By Dialexa

Technology

The top 10 most popular episodes of Custom Made.

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16 Ratings
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Cover image of Custom Made
Technology

Custom Made

By Dialexa

The top 10 most popular episodes of Custom Made.

iTunes Rating

16 Ratings
Average Rating
16
0
0
0
0
This podcast doesn't have any recommendations

"Custom Made" only has a few episodes, which are shown below as released by the author.

Top 10 Episodes of Custom Made

Rank #1: CM30: Making the Move From Graphic Design to User Experience Design w/ Anne-Marie Levinson

Aug 05 2018
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This episode #30 of Custom Made and this week I am talking with Anne-Marie Levinson, Senior Product Designer here at Dialexa. Anne-Marie brings over 6 years of experience in graphic design, advertising, design research and UX design. At Dialexa she specializes in both user experience (UX) and visual design, helping clients solve complex problems through rich user experiences and efficient design solutions. And it’s Anne-Marie’s journey from graphic designer to user-experience designer that we are going to discuss on today’s episode. We have talked a lot on this show about design thinking, user-experience design and systems design. This changing approach to designing successful products requires designers to constantly refresh their skills and capabilities, and so I wanted to sit down with Anne-Marie and have her share her journey from graphic designer to user-experience designer. A couple of weeks ago I had SMU Professor, Mark Fontenot, on Custom Made discussing how he is transforming the education of the next generation of technologists - and so now it is time to talk about how the role of a designer is evolving. During my conversation with Anne-Marie she shares what the differences are when shifting to a design thinking approach to product design, what are the steps she and you can take to transition from a graphic designer to a user experience designer, and how she continues to expand her skill sets to understand users better, ideate, prototype and test products, and she moved away from making decisions based solely on aesthetics. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #2: CM29: Use Design Thinking to Find Your Product, Market, Organization Fit w/ Sarah Reid

Jul 29 2018
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We are on episode #28 and this week I am talking with Sarah Reid, Principal within Dialexa’s Research and Design practice. Sarah has previously been on Custom Made discussing how to take a pragmatic approach to user research, using effective storytelling in product development, and using lean design research to get to the why of your product. At Dialexa, Sarah is responsible for working with our clients to get to the why of a product, creating a user experience that drives both adoption and engagement of the products we design and build, and she is a fan of pragmatic research work to enable her to provide insights in a fast and smart manner. Prior to joining Dialexa, Sarah has held UX architect and design roles at AT&T, Gamestop, and NBC Universal. On this weeks episode of Custom Made, Sarah shares how the Dialexa design process not only helps product teams create amazing experiences that delight our client’s users, but also how we have found that several of our techniques help create the transformation desired in organizations/company. During our conversation, Sarah shows how throughout our research phase we have a standard set of key objectives that can be applied to the company as well as the specific product we are building. These key objectives are: - alignment from the team to create a shared understanding, - creative thinking to really innovate on the problem we are trying to solve, - and validation from users about the desirability/usability of the solution. And finally. we discuss how rather than focusing just on developing your Product/Market Fit for successful products, you should expand your perspective to look at how you develop your Product/Market/Organization Fit to be a successful company. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #3: CM28: Bringing Innovation to Southwest Airlines through Human-centered Design w/ Heather Figallo

Jul 22 2018
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We are on episode #28 and this week I am joined by Heather Figallo, Senior Director, Innovation, Design and Entrepreneurship at Southwest Airlines. At Southwest Airlines Heather is responsible for leading the discipline of innovation as well as the newly formed labs group which develops prototypes and other stimulus for Customer and Employee feedback. Heather joined Southwest Airlines in August of 2014 as Product and Innovation lead in the Commercial Team. During her tenure at Southwest, Heather launched the Customer Experience Team within Marketing and was the Business lead on the Customer Experience side of the CX / Ops strategy development. In October of 2016 Heather moved to Corporate Strategy & Innovation to launch the Innovation Center and Lab. The Innovation Center’s charge is to create idea flow that supports the Corporate Strategy. The Innovation Center does this by inspiring innovative and agile thinking, directing innovation work through best practices and accelerating the work through the agility of labs. Prior to joining Southwest, Heather’s worked in Advertising, Digital and Innovation Agencies. During that time she led global initiatives for ExxonMobil, Coca-Cola, American Airlines, P&G and many other Fortune 500 brands. On this weeks episode of Custom Made Heather shares how she and her team have integrated human-centered design within their innovation practice to inspire, direct and accelerate change within Southwest Airlines. For listeners who aren’t familiar, human-centered design is a framework of processes, that is not restricted to interfaces or technologies, in which usability goals, user characteristics, environment, tasks and workflow of a product, service or process are given extensive attention at each stage of the design process. Throughout my conversation with Heather she digs into the detail of her teams approach, structure, and various processes they use to collect ideas, how she divides ideas into near-term and longer-term opportunities to drive change within Southwest airlines, how her team gets buy-in within the organization both at the early stage with key stakeholders and later during the prototyping phases with the end users, and then transition these prototypes to be further developed to be part of day-to-day operations. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #4: CM27: Transforming the Education of the Next Generation of Technologists w/ Mark Fontenot

Jul 15 2018
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We are on episode #27 and this week I am joined by Mark Fontenot a Clinical Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University here in Dallas. At SMU, Mark teaches classes focusing on software development, software engineering, and database systems. Previously, Mark was Founding Faculty-in-Residence of Loyd Residential Commons, and he served as Director of First Year Engineering Design in the Lyle School. His research interests are in engineering education focusing on the measurement of individual innovative behavior and fostering the creative and innovative capacity of undergraduate engineering and computer science students. In addition to teaching and research, Mark is an academic adviser to computer science majors, and serves on various committees throughout the university. On this weeks episode Mark and I are discussing what changes are needed when educating the next generation of computer scientists and engineers. During this episode we discuss what is wrong with the traditional model of engineering education and challenge the difference between teaching theory vs. application in the real-world. Mark cannot stress the importance of the human side of engineering education, and that the so-called “Soft Skills” don't necessarily come that easily to lots of engineering students. We discuss how education institutions must teach students the need to build products and solve problems for other humans, not just for the sake of building and using cool technology. These institutions need to be teaching students to think about the user – to be empathetic! Additionally students must gain experience not just working together with others in a team, but collaborating and communicating across teams and with different stakeholders. And finally we discuss how to nurture a culture of innovative and creative problem solvers. Mark outlines the Three (non-linear) components of Innovative Work Behavior: - Idea Generation - Idea Promotion - Idea Implementation Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #5: CM26: Service Design - Designing Beyond the Product w/ Bianka McGovern

Jul 08 2018
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We are on episode #26 and this week I am joined by Custom Made regular Dialexa’s Design Architect, James Utley, and we are excited to have the opportunity to talk with Bianka McGovern, Vice President, User Experience at Goldman Sachs. In her role at Goldman Sachs, Bianka is a UX design lead and program manager for various Fintech projects. Before joining Goldman Sachs, Bianka was the Head of UX in the Tax & Accounting division of Thomson Reuters. During her time there, Bianka successfully built up its UX capability and the Central User Experience team. She and her team defined the strategic direction of User Experience, implemented a Design Thinking and UX process framework for the company, and developed a design system for a portfolio of 200 products. For most of her career, Bianka has been designing in the Enterprise space, typically working on multi-layered platforms and (re-)defining the experience of business workflows. She also has agency experience from early in her career, where she focused on marketing campaigns in the consumer space (fashion and retail). She is a graduate of the University of Applied Sciences in Wuerzburg, Germany with a major in Communication Design. On this weeks episode Bianka, James and I are discussing how the design of successful products goes beyond visual design, beyond user experience design, all the way to service design. Service design is a process in which the designer focuses on creating optimal service experiences. This requires taking a holistic view of all the related actors, their interactions, the applications and products they use, and supporting materials and infrastructures. Service design often involves the use of customer journey maps, which tell the story of different customers’ interactions with a brand, thus offering deep insights. The purpose of service design methodologies is to establish best practices for designing services according to both the needs of customers and the competencies and capabilities of service providers. If a successful method of service design is employed, the service will be user-friendly and relevant to the customers, while being sustainable and competitive for the service provider. During our conversation Bianka shares the macro trends that are shaping how products and services are designed, what are some of the barriers to designing successful products, and what are some of the tools designers need to be leveraging when undertaking service design. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #6: CM25: The Internet of Things - Living at the intersection of hardware and software w/ Samer Fallouh

Jul 01 2018
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We are on episode #25 and this week I talking again with Dialexa’s Head of Engineering, Samer Fallouh. Samer has joined me previously on Custom Made to discuss how IT and product development teams within enterprise organizations need to bring modern product development methods to legacy IT operations or face disruption - you can hear more about this in Episode #15. Samer is a technologist with over fifteen years experience in building custom software and hardware products to successfully drive digital transformation at enterprise organizations, and partner with startups who have received funding and now need a technology team to bring their product to market so that it is scalable, secure and built for their user needs. Samer joined Dialexa as employee number three and has been instrumental to the growth of the company. Starting as a Solutions Engineer, Samer quickly moved into an Engineering Project Lead role, and today, he serves as Partner at Dialexa over seeing both the Software and Hardware Engineering practices. On this weeks episode Samer and I are discussing the challenges and opportunities that live at the intersection of hardware and software product development. Samer’s early experience with sensors and connected devices nearly ended up with him suing Microsoft! - I’ll let him share that story. At Dialexa, one of Samer’s first IoT projects was building the connected car company Vinli - you can hear this whole story in Episode #3 of Custom Made when I sat down with founder and CEO Mark Haidar. Now that the interest with IoT has peaked in recent years and connected products are becoming more common, Samer outlines a number challenges that companies need to plan for when building these products including cost and timeline. For example, companies have gotten used to the rapid release timelines in software but that is not possible with hardware - even on IoT projects, software and hardware need to be managed as separate sub-projects with their own processes but with the right connective tissue to make sure that integration points happen throughout the build. There is a need to use 3rd party hardware products in the early stages of your product development to save time and money, but problems will start to occur if you become dependent on using 3rd parties for your device. You are constrained by those suppliers, their business and product growth, and it may leave you not being able to scale or add the features you need in the future. From where Samer sits today, the future of pairing data from IoT sensors and digital data is significant. This combined having historical data integrated with real-time data to empower data-driven decisions is the IoT business opportunity of today and the future.

Rank #7: CM24: The Current State of Cybersecurity - Risks, Responses, & Responsibilities w/ Alex Cherones

Jun 24 2018
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We are on episode #24 and this week I have an amazing guest with me - Alex Cherones, Director of Threat and Virtual Security Services & Platform Development at AT&T. In his role as Director of Cybersecurity Threat Services, Virtual Security Functions, and Security Platform development, Alex helps create next-generation, Big Data-based cybersecurity platforms and managing the portfolio for threat services. Alex and his team lead innovation for products and services, along with elevating the customer experiences and user interfaces for AT&T Cybersecurity. Alex has more than ten years of experience with product development and product management, amounting to more than $6 billion in development responsibility and accountability. His experience combines technology, product, and finance across a variety of industries and overseeing cross-functional teams; including private equity fund management, fund creation, commercial real estate, corresponding disposition and turnaround restructuring. On this weeks episode Alex and I are discussing the cybersecurity risks, responses, and responsibilities that every individual and every organization now needs to deal with on a daily basis. During our conversation we explore the current state of cybersecurity, what are some of the cybersecurity challenges businesses are struggling with today, and how are businesses addressing these challenges? We also dig into what is the future of cybersecurity defense? How will it get better? And what are companies like AT&T doing to help combat the problem? AT&T Business has become one of the fastest growing managed security services providers in the industry, because AT&T has made cybersecurity a top focus. Investments related to advanced threat detection and analysis, threat intelligence and virtualized security functions give customers more flexibility in how they deploy security solutions. AT&T’s cybersecurity solutions help secure the assets of businesses ranging from small to large, global enterprises. According to IDC’s Marketscape Managed Security Services 2017 Vendor Assessment, AT&T has advanced to the Leader category. Armed with threat intelligence from their network security analysts and other market sources, AT&T’s cybersecurity consultants assess cybersecurity risks to a business, based on its business model, market sector, technical infrastructure, cloud strategy, vendor relationships and operational dynamics. They then recommend targeted risk management strategies, products and services. Several hundred cybersecurity professionals work across both the AT&T Business ecosystem and its Chief Security Organization to protect customers from increasingly sophisticated cyber-attacks. AT&T secures more connections than any other communications company in North America. They provide highly-secure connections to more than 143.8 million mobility customers in the U.S. and nearly 3 million businesses worldwide, with more than 41 million connected devices on their network as of Q1 2018. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #8: CM23: Agile Software Development...You are probably doing it all wrong w/ Ted Howard

Jun 17 2018
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Hey, everybody, this is Doug Platts and you are listening to the Custom Made podcast. Each week I talk with digital transformation leaders within enterprise organizations, and thought-leaders within the custom technology space. My goal is to shine a spotlight on the work that is happening in enterprise organizations who are changing, and the leaders who are driving that change. This is episode #23 and this week I’m talking with Ted Howard, a Principal and seasoned software architect here at Dialexa in our software engineering team. Ted brings almost 20 years of experience in IT systems, web and native mobile application development. He has the unique ability to connect people with ideas to the right technology to help them realize their goals. Ted’s career to date spans the entrepreneurship space where he was the co-founder of a funded technology-focused startup and actively involved with the initial planning, bootstrapping, and running. Ted also has almost a decade of consulting experience successfully delivering strategy and technology solutions to Fortune 1000 companies where he has been designing and building complex systems for a wide range of clients and industries. On this weeks episode Ted and I are discussing agile product development within the software engineering space. One quick side note - during episode #15 of Custom Made, Dialexa’s Head of Engineering Samer Fallouh discussed some of the challenges involved in bringing modern product development methods to legacy IT operations - of which agile software development was one of them - when you have finished with this episode be sure to check out episode #15 for a broader view on the range of approaches and methods that legacy IT teams need to adopt in order to create successful technology products. In this episode Ted shares how taking an “agile” approach is one of the hottest trends in software development. But, in many cases, people are not really taking an agile approach and as such not changing enough of their approach to successfully build new software products. Ted lays out what agile really is, why there may be trust issues in some organizations that restrict teams on becoming truly agile, and gives advice on how to adopt an agile approach within your IT and product development teams. Ted mentions a couple of great resources during our conversation which I will include in the show notes of this episode at Dialexa.com. Be sure to tweet me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #9: CM22: The Modern CIO (Chief Integration Officer) and Legacy IT w/ Charlie Feld

Jun 10 2018
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This is episode #22 and is the second part of my conversation with Charlie Feld. Once you have finished with this episode be sure to listen to last weeks episode #21 and part 1 of my conversation where Charlie shares his extraordinary 50-year career helping organizations and executives achieve IT-driven transformation, how the IT industry lacked a formal framework, and how IT needs to handle the speed of change for their organizations to be successful. Charlie began his career as a systems engineer at IBM, before the world grasped what a computer was. As that changed, the company’s exponential growth opened up opportunities for Charlie. At 26 Charlie was named the lead of a new team in Dallas, where he oversaw the company’s Frito-Lay account, and a little more than a decade into his time at IBM, he left the company for the PepsiCo-owned snack maker. Two years later, in 1983, Charlie was promoted to vice president and chief information officer at Frito-Lay. After 12 years with Frito-Lay, Charlie formed an organization, The Feld Group Institute, that would do interim CIO work. These teams would enter companies in need, clean up issues on the IT side, and – crucially – leave the companies with a foundation to continue succeeding after departure. Currently as the founder and CEO of The Feld Group Institute, but with a career as long as there has been an IT industry, Charlie is considered the First CIO in corporate America and has led transformation efforts for organizations including Frito-Lay, Southwest Airlines, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Delta, FedEx, EDS and BNSF. You can find more information about Charlie and The Feld Group Institute at www.feldgroupinstitute.com. On this weeks episode Charlie provides his perspective on what makes a modern day CIO, and how can they be successful. To begin with he wants to rename the CIO role from Chief Information Officer to Chief Integration Officer. Other than perhaps the COO, the CIO (the Chief Integration Officer) needs to truly understand the full extent of a business and the integration points across each function - from sales and marketing, to manufacturing and distribution, to finance and support. A modern-day CIO needs to step into the conversation with their leadership team, be collaborative, be passionate, be part of the conversation about the Who, the What, and the How and be a storyteller to get buy-in to a multi-year story that will lead to a multi-year plan. Charlie recommends to start with the story, the outline, and direction to get buy-in, don’t jump straight into detailed projects and specifics. Charlie goes on to discuss the multiple risks (i.e. Cybersecurity) in not modernizing legacy IT technology, with one of the major risks to your existing business is that your IT leadership who understand your legacy systems will be retiring in the next 5-10 years and taking that knowledge with them. This should be a real concern for all organizations, and is something relatively easy to wrap your head around - but the solution is not to train your newer staff on old technologies, but rather to modernize these systems. The modernization of an organization’s legacy IT can no longer be ignored, the risks to site and system reliability and the risks to not being able to build for the future are too high. To be able to be ready for the future, whilst modernizing the legacy technology of their organization, Charlie recommends building integration hubs tying together your organization and build for change so that you don’t start to create a new batch of legacy IT that needs to be modernized again in ten years time. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show.

Rank #10: CM21: The First CIO and the speed of change w/ Charlie Feld

Jun 03 2018
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Recently I sat down with Charlie Feld, who is currently the founder and CEO of The Feld Group Institute but has had a career as long as there has been an IT industry and is considered the First CIO in corporate America. We cover a number of great topics during our conversation which I have broken out into two episodes. This episode, episode #21, of Custom Made, and next week's episode - episode #22. If you haven’t already subscribed to Custom Made, make sure you do to catch part two and all of our previous episodes. During his extraordinary 50-year career, Charlie has been committed to helping organizations and executives achieve IT-driven transformation. He has been frequently featured in the media, and has received numerous awards and accolades in recognition of his profound influence upon the IT industry, including the Smithsonian Award for Technology Excellence, the Carnegie Mellon Award for Innovative Technology, inducted into CIO magazine’s CIO Hall of Fame and the Tech Titans Hall of Fame Award, as well as Dallas CIO’s Leadership Award. Early in his career while he was as at Frito-Lay from 1981-1992 Charlie rose to the top of the IT function, where he became one of the first outstanding CIOs in corporate America. As Charlie overcame the early challenges of the post and developed a mature IT department, he found that he longed for the challenge of the early days once again. So he elected to found his own firm, The Feld Group, where he developed one of the first frameworks for IT organizations and provides temporary CIO services for large enterprise organizations like Southwest Airlines, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Delta, FedEx, EDS, and BNSF. You can find more information about Charlie at The Feld Group Institute, and in the two books Charlie has written, The Blind Spot: A Leader’s Guide to IT-Enabled Business Transformation and The Calloway Way: Results & Integrity - I’ll include links to all of these in the show notes at Dialexa.com On this weeks episode Charlie discusses his journey as the first CIO in corporate America, how the IT industry lacked a formal framework, and how IT needs to handle the speed of change for their organizations to be successful. Whilst many industries such as engineering, finance, sales, marketing, or manufacturing has existed for centuries, IT has only been part of a business for decades and still has a way to become a mature profession. Charlie shares how he has spent his career defining one of the first frameworks and a common language for the IT organization, and influencing the role of the CIO to change how IT can capitalize on the rate of change major organizations have to manage in order to be successful and avoid disruption. Charlie shares examples of where he has driven large transformation and modernization initiatives to stabilize enterprise organizations by addressing legacy IT operations and planning/building for change. From his time at Frito-Lay, Charlie shares three principles he learned from his conversations with founder Herman Lay: 1) Seek to understand a company in its simplest form 2) Nothing good ever happens in a warehouse 3) Look to the frontline people, and understand that are doing the work When discussing the speed of change, Charlie shares an experience that allowed him to try to better predict change. To be a good leader you need to be able to pull from all three of these perspectives: Experience - The core way people have learned for centuries Analytics - The ability to break down a problem Stepping-back - The ability to zoom-out recognize patterns Finally, Charlie discusses how we are only limited by our imagination when it comes to IT - which can be a challenge for some technology and engineering leaders. Technology today is almost limitless, and we have entered the Imagination Age. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts

Top 10 Episodes of Custom Made

Rank #1: CM30: Making the Move From Graphic Design to User Experience Design w/ Anne-Marie Levinson

Aug 05 2018
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This episode #30 of Custom Made and this week I am talking with Anne-Marie Levinson, Senior Product Designer here at Dialexa. Anne-Marie brings over 6 years of experience in graphic design, advertising, design research and UX design. At Dialexa she specializes in both user experience (UX) and visual design, helping clients solve complex problems through rich user experiences and efficient design solutions. And it’s Anne-Marie’s journey from graphic designer to user-experience designer that we are going to discuss on today’s episode. We have talked a lot on this show about design thinking, user-experience design and systems design. This changing approach to designing successful products requires designers to constantly refresh their skills and capabilities, and so I wanted to sit down with Anne-Marie and have her share her journey from graphic designer to user-experience designer. A couple of weeks ago I had SMU Professor, Mark Fontenot, on Custom Made discussing how he is transforming the education of the next generation of technologists - and so now it is time to talk about how the role of a designer is evolving. During my conversation with Anne-Marie she shares what the differences are when shifting to a design thinking approach to product design, what are the steps she and you can take to transition from a graphic designer to a user experience designer, and how she continues to expand her skill sets to understand users better, ideate, prototype and test products, and she moved away from making decisions based solely on aesthetics. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #2: CM29: Use Design Thinking to Find Your Product, Market, Organization Fit w/ Sarah Reid

Jul 29 2018
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We are on episode #28 and this week I am talking with Sarah Reid, Principal within Dialexa’s Research and Design practice. Sarah has previously been on Custom Made discussing how to take a pragmatic approach to user research, using effective storytelling in product development, and using lean design research to get to the why of your product. At Dialexa, Sarah is responsible for working with our clients to get to the why of a product, creating a user experience that drives both adoption and engagement of the products we design and build, and she is a fan of pragmatic research work to enable her to provide insights in a fast and smart manner. Prior to joining Dialexa, Sarah has held UX architect and design roles at AT&T, Gamestop, and NBC Universal. On this weeks episode of Custom Made, Sarah shares how the Dialexa design process not only helps product teams create amazing experiences that delight our client’s users, but also how we have found that several of our techniques help create the transformation desired in organizations/company. During our conversation, Sarah shows how throughout our research phase we have a standard set of key objectives that can be applied to the company as well as the specific product we are building. These key objectives are: - alignment from the team to create a shared understanding, - creative thinking to really innovate on the problem we are trying to solve, - and validation from users about the desirability/usability of the solution. And finally. we discuss how rather than focusing just on developing your Product/Market Fit for successful products, you should expand your perspective to look at how you develop your Product/Market/Organization Fit to be a successful company. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #3: CM28: Bringing Innovation to Southwest Airlines through Human-centered Design w/ Heather Figallo

Jul 22 2018
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We are on episode #28 and this week I am joined by Heather Figallo, Senior Director, Innovation, Design and Entrepreneurship at Southwest Airlines. At Southwest Airlines Heather is responsible for leading the discipline of innovation as well as the newly formed labs group which develops prototypes and other stimulus for Customer and Employee feedback. Heather joined Southwest Airlines in August of 2014 as Product and Innovation lead in the Commercial Team. During her tenure at Southwest, Heather launched the Customer Experience Team within Marketing and was the Business lead on the Customer Experience side of the CX / Ops strategy development. In October of 2016 Heather moved to Corporate Strategy & Innovation to launch the Innovation Center and Lab. The Innovation Center’s charge is to create idea flow that supports the Corporate Strategy. The Innovation Center does this by inspiring innovative and agile thinking, directing innovation work through best practices and accelerating the work through the agility of labs. Prior to joining Southwest, Heather’s worked in Advertising, Digital and Innovation Agencies. During that time she led global initiatives for ExxonMobil, Coca-Cola, American Airlines, P&G and many other Fortune 500 brands. On this weeks episode of Custom Made Heather shares how she and her team have integrated human-centered design within their innovation practice to inspire, direct and accelerate change within Southwest Airlines. For listeners who aren’t familiar, human-centered design is a framework of processes, that is not restricted to interfaces or technologies, in which usability goals, user characteristics, environment, tasks and workflow of a product, service or process are given extensive attention at each stage of the design process. Throughout my conversation with Heather she digs into the detail of her teams approach, structure, and various processes they use to collect ideas, how she divides ideas into near-term and longer-term opportunities to drive change within Southwest airlines, how her team gets buy-in within the organization both at the early stage with key stakeholders and later during the prototyping phases with the end users, and then transition these prototypes to be further developed to be part of day-to-day operations. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #4: CM27: Transforming the Education of the Next Generation of Technologists w/ Mark Fontenot

Jul 15 2018
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We are on episode #27 and this week I am joined by Mark Fontenot a Clinical Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University here in Dallas. At SMU, Mark teaches classes focusing on software development, software engineering, and database systems. Previously, Mark was Founding Faculty-in-Residence of Loyd Residential Commons, and he served as Director of First Year Engineering Design in the Lyle School. His research interests are in engineering education focusing on the measurement of individual innovative behavior and fostering the creative and innovative capacity of undergraduate engineering and computer science students. In addition to teaching and research, Mark is an academic adviser to computer science majors, and serves on various committees throughout the university. On this weeks episode Mark and I are discussing what changes are needed when educating the next generation of computer scientists and engineers. During this episode we discuss what is wrong with the traditional model of engineering education and challenge the difference between teaching theory vs. application in the real-world. Mark cannot stress the importance of the human side of engineering education, and that the so-called “Soft Skills” don't necessarily come that easily to lots of engineering students. We discuss how education institutions must teach students the need to build products and solve problems for other humans, not just for the sake of building and using cool technology. These institutions need to be teaching students to think about the user – to be empathetic! Additionally students must gain experience not just working together with others in a team, but collaborating and communicating across teams and with different stakeholders. And finally we discuss how to nurture a culture of innovative and creative problem solvers. Mark outlines the Three (non-linear) components of Innovative Work Behavior: - Idea Generation - Idea Promotion - Idea Implementation Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #5: CM26: Service Design - Designing Beyond the Product w/ Bianka McGovern

Jul 08 2018
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We are on episode #26 and this week I am joined by Custom Made regular Dialexa’s Design Architect, James Utley, and we are excited to have the opportunity to talk with Bianka McGovern, Vice President, User Experience at Goldman Sachs. In her role at Goldman Sachs, Bianka is a UX design lead and program manager for various Fintech projects. Before joining Goldman Sachs, Bianka was the Head of UX in the Tax & Accounting division of Thomson Reuters. During her time there, Bianka successfully built up its UX capability and the Central User Experience team. She and her team defined the strategic direction of User Experience, implemented a Design Thinking and UX process framework for the company, and developed a design system for a portfolio of 200 products. For most of her career, Bianka has been designing in the Enterprise space, typically working on multi-layered platforms and (re-)defining the experience of business workflows. She also has agency experience from early in her career, where she focused on marketing campaigns in the consumer space (fashion and retail). She is a graduate of the University of Applied Sciences in Wuerzburg, Germany with a major in Communication Design. On this weeks episode Bianka, James and I are discussing how the design of successful products goes beyond visual design, beyond user experience design, all the way to service design. Service design is a process in which the designer focuses on creating optimal service experiences. This requires taking a holistic view of all the related actors, their interactions, the applications and products they use, and supporting materials and infrastructures. Service design often involves the use of customer journey maps, which tell the story of different customers’ interactions with a brand, thus offering deep insights. The purpose of service design methodologies is to establish best practices for designing services according to both the needs of customers and the competencies and capabilities of service providers. If a successful method of service design is employed, the service will be user-friendly and relevant to the customers, while being sustainable and competitive for the service provider. During our conversation Bianka shares the macro trends that are shaping how products and services are designed, what are some of the barriers to designing successful products, and what are some of the tools designers need to be leveraging when undertaking service design. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #6: CM25: The Internet of Things - Living at the intersection of hardware and software w/ Samer Fallouh

Jul 01 2018
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We are on episode #25 and this week I talking again with Dialexa’s Head of Engineering, Samer Fallouh. Samer has joined me previously on Custom Made to discuss how IT and product development teams within enterprise organizations need to bring modern product development methods to legacy IT operations or face disruption - you can hear more about this in Episode #15. Samer is a technologist with over fifteen years experience in building custom software and hardware products to successfully drive digital transformation at enterprise organizations, and partner with startups who have received funding and now need a technology team to bring their product to market so that it is scalable, secure and built for their user needs. Samer joined Dialexa as employee number three and has been instrumental to the growth of the company. Starting as a Solutions Engineer, Samer quickly moved into an Engineering Project Lead role, and today, he serves as Partner at Dialexa over seeing both the Software and Hardware Engineering practices. On this weeks episode Samer and I are discussing the challenges and opportunities that live at the intersection of hardware and software product development. Samer’s early experience with sensors and connected devices nearly ended up with him suing Microsoft! - I’ll let him share that story. At Dialexa, one of Samer’s first IoT projects was building the connected car company Vinli - you can hear this whole story in Episode #3 of Custom Made when I sat down with founder and CEO Mark Haidar. Now that the interest with IoT has peaked in recent years and connected products are becoming more common, Samer outlines a number challenges that companies need to plan for when building these products including cost and timeline. For example, companies have gotten used to the rapid release timelines in software but that is not possible with hardware - even on IoT projects, software and hardware need to be managed as separate sub-projects with their own processes but with the right connective tissue to make sure that integration points happen throughout the build. There is a need to use 3rd party hardware products in the early stages of your product development to save time and money, but problems will start to occur if you become dependent on using 3rd parties for your device. You are constrained by those suppliers, their business and product growth, and it may leave you not being able to scale or add the features you need in the future. From where Samer sits today, the future of pairing data from IoT sensors and digital data is significant. This combined having historical data integrated with real-time data to empower data-driven decisions is the IoT business opportunity of today and the future.

Rank #7: CM24: The Current State of Cybersecurity - Risks, Responses, & Responsibilities w/ Alex Cherones

Jun 24 2018
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We are on episode #24 and this week I have an amazing guest with me - Alex Cherones, Director of Threat and Virtual Security Services & Platform Development at AT&T. In his role as Director of Cybersecurity Threat Services, Virtual Security Functions, and Security Platform development, Alex helps create next-generation, Big Data-based cybersecurity platforms and managing the portfolio for threat services. Alex and his team lead innovation for products and services, along with elevating the customer experiences and user interfaces for AT&T Cybersecurity. Alex has more than ten years of experience with product development and product management, amounting to more than $6 billion in development responsibility and accountability. His experience combines technology, product, and finance across a variety of industries and overseeing cross-functional teams; including private equity fund management, fund creation, commercial real estate, corresponding disposition and turnaround restructuring. On this weeks episode Alex and I are discussing the cybersecurity risks, responses, and responsibilities that every individual and every organization now needs to deal with on a daily basis. During our conversation we explore the current state of cybersecurity, what are some of the cybersecurity challenges businesses are struggling with today, and how are businesses addressing these challenges? We also dig into what is the future of cybersecurity defense? How will it get better? And what are companies like AT&T doing to help combat the problem? AT&T Business has become one of the fastest growing managed security services providers in the industry, because AT&T has made cybersecurity a top focus. Investments related to advanced threat detection and analysis, threat intelligence and virtualized security functions give customers more flexibility in how they deploy security solutions. AT&T’s cybersecurity solutions help secure the assets of businesses ranging from small to large, global enterprises. According to IDC’s Marketscape Managed Security Services 2017 Vendor Assessment, AT&T has advanced to the Leader category. Armed with threat intelligence from their network security analysts and other market sources, AT&T’s cybersecurity consultants assess cybersecurity risks to a business, based on its business model, market sector, technical infrastructure, cloud strategy, vendor relationships and operational dynamics. They then recommend targeted risk management strategies, products and services. Several hundred cybersecurity professionals work across both the AT&T Business ecosystem and its Chief Security Organization to protect customers from increasingly sophisticated cyber-attacks. AT&T secures more connections than any other communications company in North America. They provide highly-secure connections to more than 143.8 million mobility customers in the U.S. and nearly 3 million businesses worldwide, with more than 41 million connected devices on their network as of Q1 2018. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #8: CM23: Agile Software Development...You are probably doing it all wrong w/ Ted Howard

Jun 17 2018
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Hey, everybody, this is Doug Platts and you are listening to the Custom Made podcast. Each week I talk with digital transformation leaders within enterprise organizations, and thought-leaders within the custom technology space. My goal is to shine a spotlight on the work that is happening in enterprise organizations who are changing, and the leaders who are driving that change. This is episode #23 and this week I’m talking with Ted Howard, a Principal and seasoned software architect here at Dialexa in our software engineering team. Ted brings almost 20 years of experience in IT systems, web and native mobile application development. He has the unique ability to connect people with ideas to the right technology to help them realize their goals. Ted’s career to date spans the entrepreneurship space where he was the co-founder of a funded technology-focused startup and actively involved with the initial planning, bootstrapping, and running. Ted also has almost a decade of consulting experience successfully delivering strategy and technology solutions to Fortune 1000 companies where he has been designing and building complex systems for a wide range of clients and industries. On this weeks episode Ted and I are discussing agile product development within the software engineering space. One quick side note - during episode #15 of Custom Made, Dialexa’s Head of Engineering Samer Fallouh discussed some of the challenges involved in bringing modern product development methods to legacy IT operations - of which agile software development was one of them - when you have finished with this episode be sure to check out episode #15 for a broader view on the range of approaches and methods that legacy IT teams need to adopt in order to create successful technology products. In this episode Ted shares how taking an “agile” approach is one of the hottest trends in software development. But, in many cases, people are not really taking an agile approach and as such not changing enough of their approach to successfully build new software products. Ted lays out what agile really is, why there may be trust issues in some organizations that restrict teams on becoming truly agile, and gives advice on how to adopt an agile approach within your IT and product development teams. Ted mentions a couple of great resources during our conversation which I will include in the show notes of this episode at Dialexa.com. Be sure to tweet me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show. Follow Dialexa on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dialexa/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dialexa/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dialexa Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/custom-made-dialexa iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/custom-made/id1332213517?mt=2 Player.fm: https://player.fm/series/custom-made Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1332213517/custom-made Twitter: https://twitter.com/dialexa Medium: https://medium.com/back-to-the-napkin Podcast: https://by.dialexa.com/topic/custom-made YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dialexa Subscribe to our weekly newsletter for our latest content and top weekly reads here: https://by.dialexa.com/newsletter-signup

Rank #9: CM22: The Modern CIO (Chief Integration Officer) and Legacy IT w/ Charlie Feld

Jun 10 2018
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This is episode #22 and is the second part of my conversation with Charlie Feld. Once you have finished with this episode be sure to listen to last weeks episode #21 and part 1 of my conversation where Charlie shares his extraordinary 50-year career helping organizations and executives achieve IT-driven transformation, how the IT industry lacked a formal framework, and how IT needs to handle the speed of change for their organizations to be successful. Charlie began his career as a systems engineer at IBM, before the world grasped what a computer was. As that changed, the company’s exponential growth opened up opportunities for Charlie. At 26 Charlie was named the lead of a new team in Dallas, where he oversaw the company’s Frito-Lay account, and a little more than a decade into his time at IBM, he left the company for the PepsiCo-owned snack maker. Two years later, in 1983, Charlie was promoted to vice president and chief information officer at Frito-Lay. After 12 years with Frito-Lay, Charlie formed an organization, The Feld Group Institute, that would do interim CIO work. These teams would enter companies in need, clean up issues on the IT side, and – crucially – leave the companies with a foundation to continue succeeding after departure. Currently as the founder and CEO of The Feld Group Institute, but with a career as long as there has been an IT industry, Charlie is considered the First CIO in corporate America and has led transformation efforts for organizations including Frito-Lay, Southwest Airlines, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Delta, FedEx, EDS and BNSF. You can find more information about Charlie and The Feld Group Institute at www.feldgroupinstitute.com. On this weeks episode Charlie provides his perspective on what makes a modern day CIO, and how can they be successful. To begin with he wants to rename the CIO role from Chief Information Officer to Chief Integration Officer. Other than perhaps the COO, the CIO (the Chief Integration Officer) needs to truly understand the full extent of a business and the integration points across each function - from sales and marketing, to manufacturing and distribution, to finance and support. A modern-day CIO needs to step into the conversation with their leadership team, be collaborative, be passionate, be part of the conversation about the Who, the What, and the How and be a storyteller to get buy-in to a multi-year story that will lead to a multi-year plan. Charlie recommends to start with the story, the outline, and direction to get buy-in, don’t jump straight into detailed projects and specifics. Charlie goes on to discuss the multiple risks (i.e. Cybersecurity) in not modernizing legacy IT technology, with one of the major risks to your existing business is that your IT leadership who understand your legacy systems will be retiring in the next 5-10 years and taking that knowledge with them. This should be a real concern for all organizations, and is something relatively easy to wrap your head around - but the solution is not to train your newer staff on old technologies, but rather to modernize these systems. The modernization of an organization’s legacy IT can no longer be ignored, the risks to site and system reliability and the risks to not being able to build for the future are too high. To be able to be ready for the future, whilst modernizing the legacy technology of their organization, Charlie recommends building integration hubs tying together your organization and build for change so that you don’t start to create a new batch of legacy IT that needs to be modernized again in ten years time. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts) and let me know what you think of the show.

Rank #10: CM21: The First CIO and the speed of change w/ Charlie Feld

Jun 03 2018
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Recently I sat down with Charlie Feld, who is currently the founder and CEO of The Feld Group Institute but has had a career as long as there has been an IT industry and is considered the First CIO in corporate America. We cover a number of great topics during our conversation which I have broken out into two episodes. This episode, episode #21, of Custom Made, and next week's episode - episode #22. If you haven’t already subscribed to Custom Made, make sure you do to catch part two and all of our previous episodes. During his extraordinary 50-year career, Charlie has been committed to helping organizations and executives achieve IT-driven transformation. He has been frequently featured in the media, and has received numerous awards and accolades in recognition of his profound influence upon the IT industry, including the Smithsonian Award for Technology Excellence, the Carnegie Mellon Award for Innovative Technology, inducted into CIO magazine’s CIO Hall of Fame and the Tech Titans Hall of Fame Award, as well as Dallas CIO’s Leadership Award. Early in his career while he was as at Frito-Lay from 1981-1992 Charlie rose to the top of the IT function, where he became one of the first outstanding CIOs in corporate America. As Charlie overcame the early challenges of the post and developed a mature IT department, he found that he longed for the challenge of the early days once again. So he elected to found his own firm, The Feld Group, where he developed one of the first frameworks for IT organizations and provides temporary CIO services for large enterprise organizations like Southwest Airlines, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Delta, FedEx, EDS, and BNSF. You can find more information about Charlie at The Feld Group Institute, and in the two books Charlie has written, The Blind Spot: A Leader’s Guide to IT-Enabled Business Transformation and The Calloway Way: Results & Integrity - I’ll include links to all of these in the show notes at Dialexa.com On this weeks episode Charlie discusses his journey as the first CIO in corporate America, how the IT industry lacked a formal framework, and how IT needs to handle the speed of change for their organizations to be successful. Whilst many industries such as engineering, finance, sales, marketing, or manufacturing has existed for centuries, IT has only been part of a business for decades and still has a way to become a mature profession. Charlie shares how he has spent his career defining one of the first frameworks and a common language for the IT organization, and influencing the role of the CIO to change how IT can capitalize on the rate of change major organizations have to manage in order to be successful and avoid disruption. Charlie shares examples of where he has driven large transformation and modernization initiatives to stabilize enterprise organizations by addressing legacy IT operations and planning/building for change. From his time at Frito-Lay, Charlie shares three principles he learned from his conversations with founder Herman Lay: 1) Seek to understand a company in its simplest form 2) Nothing good ever happens in a warehouse 3) Look to the frontline people, and understand that are doing the work When discussing the speed of change, Charlie shares an experience that allowed him to try to better predict change. To be a good leader you need to be able to pull from all three of these perspectives: Experience - The core way people have learned for centuries Analytics - The ability to break down a problem Stepping-back - The ability to zoom-out recognize patterns Finally, Charlie discusses how we are only limited by our imagination when it comes to IT - which can be a challenge for some technology and engineering leaders. Technology today is almost limitless, and we have entered the Imagination Age. Be sure to tweet at me (https://twitter.com/dougplatts