Cover image of The StartupCamp Podcast with Chris Graebe
(343)
Business
Education
Careers

The StartupCamp Podcast with Chris Graebe

Updated 10 days ago

Business
Education
Careers
Read more

Each week, we deliver advice from some of the greatest thought leaders, entrepreneurs, and influencers. Tune in to a show created for the startups, entrepreneurs, and everyday dreamers that want to learn how to form strong ideas, launch lucrative ventures, position their brand, love their people, and develop business models that offer freedom to their founders. Your host, Chris Graebe, is a multi-million dollar e-commerce entrepreneur, a former reality show star, and a man passionate about seeing people win in life and in business.*To suggest a guest for our show, or host Chris on your show, please email lindsay@startupcamp.com.

Read more

Each week, we deliver advice from some of the greatest thought leaders, entrepreneurs, and influencers. Tune in to a show created for the startups, entrepreneurs, and everyday dreamers that want to learn how to form strong ideas, launch lucrative ventures, position their brand, love their people, and develop business models that offer freedom to their founders. Your host, Chris Graebe, is a multi-million dollar e-commerce entrepreneur, a former reality show star, and a man passionate about seeing people win in life and in business.*To suggest a guest for our show, or host Chris on your show, please email lindsay@startupcamp.com.

iTunes Ratings

343 Ratings
Average Ratings
332
4
2
1
4

Love IT!

By Twillis03 - Apr 10 2019
Read more
This is a awesome Podcast i'm recommending to all my people! Keep up the good work!

Informative good content

By Crazyrunner4God - Apr 06 2019
Read more
Great energy, content is almost always very good and applicable

iTunes Ratings

343 Ratings
Average Ratings
332
4
2
1
4

Love IT!

By Twillis03 - Apr 10 2019
Read more
This is a awesome Podcast i'm recommending to all my people! Keep up the good work!

Informative good content

By Crazyrunner4God - Apr 06 2019
Read more
Great energy, content is almost always very good and applicable
Cover image of The StartupCamp Podcast with Chris Graebe

The StartupCamp Podcast with Chris Graebe

Updated 10 days ago

Read more

Each week, we deliver advice from some of the greatest thought leaders, entrepreneurs, and influencers. Tune in to a show created for the startups, entrepreneurs, and everyday dreamers that want to learn how to form strong ideas, launch lucrative ventures, position their brand, love their people, and develop business models that offer freedom to their founders. Your host, Chris Graebe, is a multi-million dollar e-commerce entrepreneur, a former reality show star, and a man passionate about seeing people win in life and in business.*To suggest a guest for our show, or host Chris on your show, please email lindsay@startupcamp.com.

Keep Your Focus; Become Unstoppable with David Hauser

Podcast cover
Read more

How one man bootstrapped his business to $30 million – and sold it to become an angel investor.

Although David Hauser had an entrepreneurial spirit from a young age, when he co-founded Grasshopper (then GotVMail) in 2003, he realized he had a lot to learn about running and scaling a business. But the biggest lesson he learned in the twelve years he ran Grasshopper? Every time David’s attention shifted away from Grasshopper to start a new business or chase a new idea – Grasshopper suffered. Keep your focus, he says, even when you have the urge to chase that shiny object. In the long run, you’ll be thankful.

Now, David is an angel investor and the author of Unstoppable: 4 Steps to Change Your Life. In this episode, we discuss paid marketing versus organic content (and how David advocates for small businesses), what he looks for in a business as an angel investor, and the importance of screening your new business for employees that share your core values.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/DavidHauserV1Final-Copy.mp3 Subscribe
Aug 20 2019
43 mins
Play

Focus and Become Great with Greg Mercer

Podcast cover
Read more

How one man created a game-changing Amazon software business

Greg was stuck in a cubicle writing engineering reports. He was a civil engineer, after all. Yet his whole life, he’d had this entrepreneurial drive. He started by googling “how to make money online” and eventually began selling on Amazon. He got extremely good at it. So good, he started tracking Amazon product data in spreadsheets – and discovered a pattern that made him hit home-run product launches nearly every time. This excel sheet formula became Jungle Scout, a product data aggregator for Amazon that helps sellers find potential successful products to sell.

Learn about Greg’s transition from corporate life to traveling the world and starting a software company (even though he’s not a developer!), why “profit over passion” is an important business motto, and why you need to pick one marketing strategy right now – and stick with it. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/GregMercerV1Final.mp3 Subscribe
Jul 30 2019
44 mins
Play

Don’t Lose Your Authenticity with Rachel Cruze

Podcast cover
Read more

How Rachel Cruze found her passion and took responsibility for her future

As the daughter of Dave Ramsey, Rachel Cruze didn’t have a typical childhood. She learned how to budget at age nine, and when she was a teenager, someone at Ramsey Solutions had the bright idea to invite Rachel on stage at a weekend live event to be the spokesperson for a line of products aimed at kids.

That would frighten most – but Rachel learned that public speaking was her passion. She continued to make speaking part of her life by following in her father’s footsteps and creating her own brand all about preventing debt, becoming debt-free, and family budgeting. She’s the host of the Rachel Cruze Show, a YouTube channel and podcast devoted to saving and budgeting.

In this episode, Rachel tells us what it’s like to grow up under the wing of a successful entrepreneur and shares her passion for helping others. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/RachelCruzeV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“I think for a lot of entrepreneurs, there’s just this belief that they can do anything and they can control their life.”

In the Ramsey household, Rachel grew up with the mindset that she could pursue whatever passion held her interest – but if she wanted to create her own business, she was responsible for it, as the business rises and falls with you. Entrepreneurs, she says, have this grit that propels them to create their own change instead of just living with what they’ve been dealt.

“In the name of being more sophisticated, it lost some of the hearts.”

Rachel wanted to refine her video creation process. Although she was used to and enjoyed the spontaneity of coming up with topics and speaking off the cuff, she decided to start writing scripts and change her delivery style on camera. She even brought in a teleprompter. The result? It wasn’t working. The very thing she enjoyed about speaking in front of a camera – the spontaneity – was lost in this new process. She had to re-examine what worked and remove what didn’t while still delivering a professional product.

“People crave authenticity.”

On video especially, people can sniff out insincerity, Rachel advises. That’s why it’s all the more important you speak or write about a topic that’s close to your heart. Don’t be afraid to be a little vulnerable with your audience.

Jul 23 2019
28 mins
Play

The Art of Negotiation with Chris Voss

Podcast cover
Read more

How to negotiate with anyone, from a former hostage negotiator

From small-town Iowa to lead international FBI kidnapping negotiator, Chris has taught negotiation as a business skill at universities across the U.S. It’s through these teaching sessions that he developed a comprehensive, practical methodology, which eventually became his book Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As if Your Life Depended On It.

Today, Chris joins us to share powerful pieces of negotiation wisdom that you don’t have to be an FBI agent to utilize. These effective, easy to understand tactics can work in your business and personal life and are especially helpful for entrepreneurs who feel like they’re always getting the short end of the stick. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/ChristopherVossV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“It’s what you say versus what they hear.”

Think about the phrase, “How am I supposed to do that?” Your tone can dictate the mood of the phrase, but what it’s really saying is, “I can’t do that.” Said gently, the person on the other side of the conversation will realize you can’t budge on that particular point. The objective of “How am I supposed to do that?” – an easy phrase to incorporate into your repertoire – is to get the other person to see your perspective on the problem. Once they do that, it’s easier to move them to a solution.

“There’s something more important than the deal itself.”

A control-oriented negotiator is a vulnerable negotiator, Chris says. You can give your opponent “control” of the situation by telling them that they are in charge if they care more about that then the actual deal on the table. Once you give them what they want, they may defer to you for the next step. After all, it doesn’t matter who came up with the idea – as long as you don’t care who gets credit, anything is possible.

“That’s right.”

The two most powerful words you can get the other person to say? It’s not “You’re right.” It’s “That’s right.” When someone says, “You’re right,” they can easily dismiss you. “That’s right” comes in when you’re agreeing emphatically with a point. Chris shares a strategy to help the other person say these two powerful words to you.

Chris emphasizes that it’s not about getting to yes in an exchange. It’s about mastering the intricacies of the “no” so you can get what you want.

Jul 09 2019
40 mins
Play

Your Podcast Is Going to Fail with John Lee Dumas

Podcast cover
Read more

How one man found and dominated the business podcasting market

After returning from his tour in Iraq, John Lee Dumas fell in love with podcasts, and especially podcasts that interviewed entrepreneurs. But he would binge all the episodes and would become dismayed when he’d run out of content. He saw a market for a podcast that brought fresh entrepreneurial perspectives every day. That’s how Entrepreneur on Fire was born.

Now, John Lee Dumas (or JLD for short) makes six figures a month on his podcast and lives it up in Puerto Rico. He shares a snapshot of his journey and drive to create a successful podcast. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/JohnLeeDunmasV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“I had to have trust and faith that my daily shows were building to something.”

For 2,000 days, JLD posted an episode – that’s nearly five and a half years of daily content. But, for the first nine months, his podcast barely made any money. Remember that nine months of daily content is nearly three hundred episodes. And weekly podcasts would only put out fifty-two episodes a year. After nine months, he felt the momentum grow, and after thirteen months, he’d reached his tipping point.

“Your podcast is going to fail.”

If you’re just out to copy a successful podcaster, you’re probably going to fail. Remember that JLD started his podcast because he was willing to do something no one had ever done before – release an interview with an entrepreneur every single day.

You have to operate in what JLD calls the “Zone of Fire”. Essentially, the place where your passion AND your expertise meet. JLD offers free podcast courses on how you can create your first podcast, but, if your heart isn’t in it, it’s going to show.

As an aspiring podcaster, you might be tempted to play it safe with your questions when you have a guest on the show. JLD shares his number one question to ask a guest to get them off-message and engage with them on a deeper level.

Jul 02 2019
33 mins
Play

Prune What You Love with Dr. John Townsend

Podcast cover
Read more

How to recognize and cultivate healthy relationships to sustain you and your business

Business can be a lonely place…  And people will suck you dry if you’re not careful. 

Fortunately, Dr. John Townsend has a solution, and it’s all about building more positive relationships. He’s a business consultant and psychologist who directed a healthcare company for a decade and worked often with business owners who suffered from depression and anxiety. 

He wrote his new book, People Fuel: Fill Your Tank for Life, Love, and Leadership, to help leaders and entrepreneurs like you ensure you’ve got the right people in your corner, cheering you on. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/JohnTownsendV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“The biggest problem with entrepreneurs? Too big a vision…You’re going to have to prune things you love.”

There are three things you need to succeed: vision, follow-up, and healthy relationships. Even if you have the first two and you don’t have the latter, success is going to be difficult to achieve, Dr. Townsend says. According to his research, people fuel our brains. Just as our bodies need bio-nutrients to survive, so our brain requires relational nutrients to sustain itself. Meaning: healthy relationships give us energy. Unhealthy relationships take away energy.

“We’re being fed by them, we take that from them, and we give it back to them.”

Who are the gains and who are the drains? You’ll have to take a hard look at the relationships in your life and figure out who sustains you – and who drains you. Every relationship falls into what Dr. Townsend calls the 7 C’s: Coaches, Comrades, Casuals, Colleagues, Care, Chronics, and Contaminants. The bottom three you have to avoid, as much as possible, while seeking the top three to create your “life team” – a group of people who you can support, and who offer support in return.

“The person you have not forgiven controls you.”

When you have been wronged, you might be fuming and sitting around waiting for the other party to approach you and apologize. But, that may not happen. Dr. Townsend says that when in doubt, provide or receive forgiveness – because the alternative can be all-consuming.

Dr. Townsend unpacks so much more for us about how to be happy, productive, and fulfilled at work. Check out the podcast now.

Jun 25 2019
37 mins
Play

The Beautiful Art of Service with Horst Schulze

Podcast cover
Read more

Why keeping the customer happy is the not-so-secret key to success

When he was eleven-years-old, living in a small German town, he proudly told his parents he would someday own a hotel business. They were concerned, as that was not a respectable career choice at the time. At 14, he took a position at the closest luxury hotel, nearly 100 km away.

This isn’t a hotel we could ever stay at, his parents told him. This hotel is for very important people.

On his first day, the maitre d’ told young Horst Schulze, “Don’t come to work every day. Come to be excellent in what you are doing.”

At first, he was confused. What was so excellent about cleaning floors and washing dishes? Yet, after watching how the Very Important People who stayed at the hotel treated the maitre d’ as if he was the most important person in the room—he realized that excellence. And deciding to be excellent was the secret to his success.

Horst Schulze went on to co-found the Ritz Carlton and authored Excellence Wins: A No-Nonsense Guide to Becoming the Best in a World of Compromise. This interview is perfect for the startup entrepreneur, as Horst does a deep dive on his thought process behind creating a luxury brand that serves the customer better than the competition. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/HorstSchulzeV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“People talk about service, but they have no process for it.”

There are three subconscious desires that every customer wants when they make a purchase, regardless of industry, Horst says. First, you want the product to be defect free. Second, you want it when you want it, regardless of time limits. And, lastly, you want the people who give it to you to be nice to you.

Yet, it’s not just about following these three basic steps. You have to have a vision for where your company will be in ten years. You should make a detailed list of twenty ways you are going to deliver your product or service better than the competition—and then have everyone in your company, no matter how menial the role, focus on this list.

“Don’t get carried away with what you think is right.”

When plastic cards became the leading-edge replacement for physical keys, Horst became excited. After all, in his mind, it was a more secure system. Yet, at first, his customers hated the idea. Why, they asked, do I have to use cheap plastic as a key to enter my luxury hotel room?

Just because something is leading edge, it doesn’t mean you need to adopt it immediately. You, as the business owner, know the benefits. But, the customer needs time to adjust to new technology and changes. There’s value, he says, in being just behind the curve.

Horst offers practical advice for entrepreneurs who strive to be the best in their industry—regardless of industry.

Jun 18 2019
42 mins
Play

Make Better Decisions Now with Annie Duke

Podcast cover
Read more

How to take charge of your decision-making

Annie Duke was so close to receiving her PhD in psychology. Yet a chronic illness left her in the hospital, unable to work. Having a knack for poker, she decided to try playing professionally.

During nearly twenty years as a professional poker player, she won millions of dollars and holds a World Series of Poker bracelet. Now, she’s a consultant, speaker, and the author of Thinking In Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All The Facts.

As an entrepreneur, you’ll make thousands of decisions – and you’ll rarely have all the facts. Some will be life-altering and others will have no impact. Annie Duke helps us navigate the decision-making process so you can move forward with confidence, even in uncertainty.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/AnnieDukeV1STARTUP.mp3 Subscribe

“We have this battle between the person who we are right now and the person we want to be in the future.”

There are many reasons we make poor decisions, but one reason is that we only take short-term gain into account. That’s why we have to be time-travelers—in a manner of speaking, Annie says. Taking a moment to think, “What would Future Me think say about this situation?” could change what you do today, at this moment. A large source of frustration is probably a blip to your future self. The idea of this exercise is to give yourself some much-needed objectivity.

“You should wrap your arms around [uncertainty] and give it a big ol’ hug.”

The power of “I’m not sure” might surprise you.

First, saying, “I’m not sure” isn’t the same as, “I have no idea.”

You probably know, based on your best guess and your values, what you will do after listening to this podcast episode. By leaving room for some uncertainty, you’re opening your mind up to alternate paths and decisions.

By the same token, having complete certainty in your beliefs can be limiting. If you only seek out information that confirms your beliefs, you’re missing out on potentially valuable information from an opposing side.

You’re never going to be 100% certain. But if you’re certain enough, that should be enough.

“Why am I here?”

You can do the math and make your decision tree (she explains how in the episode) to get clarity on your position. But all of that may not matter if you don’t know how you got to where you’re at. You have to carefully consider emotional angles as well as logical ones when you’re weighing decisions—one of the reasons why a pros and cons list won’t cut it for decision-making.

Jun 11 2019
48 mins
Play

Staying Motivated in Your Business with Scott Belsky

Podcast cover
Read more

How to actually work on and in your business without becoming discouraged

Co-founder of Behance, Scott Belsky, kept a notebook called “Essential Insights” handy during meetings and phone conversations with creative entrepreneurs. Whenever he’d hear something poignant, he’d jot it down, with the intention of putting it into practice in his business and personal life.

Flipping through the pages and realizing he’d collected 860+ insights, he started to organize them into categories (Endurance, Optimization, The Final Mile). Through this framework, his book The Messy Middle was born.

Here at Startupcamp, we often focus on how to start a business. You may have heard or read a lot about entrepreneurs selling their businesses. But what happens in between? How do entrepreneurs sustain their creative drive and their motivation to continue, even when things seem bleak?

Scott Belsky speaks to the silent struggle of entrepreneurship: the day-in, day-out battle of keeping your business alive and well. It’s a must-listen for any would-be entrepreneur. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ScottBelskyV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“The competitive advantage of most start-ups is sticking together long enough to figure it out.”

How many times have you seen a budding entrepreneur post on social media that they’re starting a business, and six months to a year later, the thought pops into your head: what happened to so-and-so and their startup?

When you’re working towards a long-term goal, Scott says, you’re suddenly at odds with the short-term rewards system on which the nine-to-five world operates: getting paid every two weeks, bonuses at the end of the year, perhaps a scheduled vacation or days off. People fool themselves into thinking a long-term goal can sustain them on a day-to-day basis, when that may not be the case.

The solution? You have to create your own short-term milestones and celebrate them, no matter how trivial they may seem. You have to create a culture where people show up, even if it’s an act of love.

“Great teams are made by developing a process or way of being that is constantly optimized.”

Optimizing the right aspect of your business is part of scaling—but how do you know what to optimize? Scott says it’s not about fixing what’s broken. Instead, if something works, improve it. Make it the best it can be before improving anything else.

It’s not just about A/B testing what color on a button drives the most conversions. It’s about A/B testing systems within your business, too.

“Part of the job of the entrepreneur is to accept the burden of constantly processing uncertainty.”

Even on his honeymoon in Thailand, part of Scott’s brain was back at his office, worrying about his team and the finances. He says that like a computer dedicating 20-30% of its RAM to maintaining the operating system, you too will have a portion of your brain always thinking about your business and worrying about its future.

Success corrupts, Scott says. When people start receiving attention, they stop paying attention. You can sustain your business only if you remain aware of the opportunities surrounding you.

Jun 04 2019
31 mins
Play

Being A Warrior with Erwin McManus

Podcast cover
Read more

How to find inner peace to achieve exterior success.

When Erwin McManus was fourteen, he started his first business: a lawn mowing company. He’d approach corporations and affluent houses and earn ten to fifteen times what other kids earned mowing suburban homes in his own neighborhood.

Since then, he’s started multiple companies in film and fashion and is the lead pastor of Mosaic. Most recently, he’s the author of The Way of the Warrior: An Ancient Path to Inner Peace.

We have to recognize, Erwin says, that inner peace is a daily struggle. It’s never over. Life doesn’t get easier. Instead, we have to challenge ourselves to be stronger, every day, to be ready for whatever comes our way tomorrow. It’s this mindset that has guided him through his entrepreneurial successes and failures. Listen now.

https://startupcamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ErwinMcManusV1Final.mp3 Subscribe

“Your power is silent.”

Erwin’s grandfather had a profound impact on him. He could walk into a room without making a sound. He never raised his voice. People who yell, he said, are powerless. They try to fill the space with noise because they know they have no impact.

From his grandfather, Erwin learned the idea of “being invisible” and having silent power. Making decisions is a silent power. Affecting people’s values, even when you’re not in the room—that’s also a silent power. Learning to nurture people to find good ideas, instead of being an idea person—another silent power.

The idea is not to intimidate or drive others away. Instead, pull people in. This is how you will have the most impact.

“I can tell you, the peace I’ve had, I’ve lost many times.”

After waking up after a six-hour surgery during his battle with cancer, Erwin immediately got out of his hospital bed to go for a walk. He refused medication. He wanted to stand in his pain; he knew if he withstood raw, physical pain, he could face anything life threw at him.  

Erwin doesn’t just open up about his physical pain. One morning, Erwin woke up to discover that his business partner had stolen his business. All the profit Erwin had reinvested, everything that Erwin had built, was gone—he estimates a loss of $5 to $6 million. He was devastated, not just by the loss, but by the betrayal.

A week later, his former partner calls him, asking him to fly to New York to negotiate a buy-back.

Erwin’s response? “Keep it.”

It took years, support from his family, and inner strength to recover, but Erwin stands firm and has no regrets or bitterness towards his former partner. “They didn’t have a strategy for generosity. They only had a strategy for greed.”

Erwin’s warm personality draws you in, no matter if he’s detailing the business ventures of his youth or his financial hardships.

“If you are dealing with this internal struggle, you’re a warrior. It takes incredible courage to own the fact that there’s stuff inside you that you need to deal with.”

May 28 2019
48 mins
Play
Loading

Similar Podcasts