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(541)

Rank #12 in Careers category

Business
Education
Careers
Management & Marketing
Training

Coaching for Leaders

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #12 in Careers category

Business
Education
Careers
Management & Marketing
Training
Read more

Discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations

Read more

Discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations

iTunes Ratings

541 Ratings
Average Ratings
479
31
14
11
6

Outstanding!

By Educator Todd - Feb 20 2019
Read more
I have been listening for just over a year and find value (big and small) in every episode

Very interesting and inspiring

By Miah2611 - Oct 28 2018
Read more
I am so happy I found this podcast!

iTunes Ratings

541 Ratings
Average Ratings
479
31
14
11
6

Outstanding!

By Educator Todd - Feb 20 2019
Read more
I have been listening for just over a year and find value (big and small) in every episode

Very interesting and inspiring

By Miah2611 - Oct 28 2018
Read more
I am so happy I found this podcast!
Cover image of Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #12 in Careers category

Read more

Discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations

Rank #1: 306: Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond

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Jonathan Raymond: Good Authority
Jonathan Raymond is the founder of Refound, a firm that believes we should all be aiming for more Yoda and less Superman. He is the author of the book, Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For*.

Many managers and leaders recognize when more accountability is needed, but few use a process that invites high performance and embraces the whole person. In his work at Refound, Jonathan invites leaders to imagine a world where personal and professional growth are one thing, and where improving your relationships and owning your strengths translate directly into the rest of your life.

In this conversation, Jonathan teaches us a common language around accountability that works for almost everyone. Plus, he teaches us the five key steps of the accountability dial.
Key Points

Micromanagement is focused on tasks, but accountability is focused on relationships.
Accountability doesn’t work unless there’s a context of personal caring.
Employees want growth, and growth comes from productive discomfort. If you if you orient your day towards acknowledgment only on the positive side, you’re missing the better part of it.

The 5 Steps of the Accountability Dial:

The Mention
The Invitation
The Conversation
The Boundary
The Limit

Resources Mentioned

Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For* by Jonathan Raymond
Download the Accountability Dial
Refound (Jonathan's Firm)

Book Notes
Download my highlights from Good Authority in PDF format (free membership required).
Related Episodes

How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
New Management Practices of Leading Organizations, with David Burkus (episode 253)
Moving Beyond Command and Control, with Brian Robertson (episode 258)

Discover More
Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
Jul 17 2017
43 mins
Play

Rank #2: 271: How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser

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Judith Glaser: Conversational Intelligence
Judith Glaser is an Organizational Anthropologist. She is one of the most pioneering and innovative change agents, consultants, and executive coaches, in the consulting industry and is the world’s leading authority on Conversational Intelligence, Neuro-innovation, and WE-centric Leadership. She is a best-selling author of seven business books including her newest best seller Conversational Intelligence: How Great Leaders Build Trust and Get Extraordinary Results.
Key Points

Great conversation leads to great relationships, which leads to great culture.
Level I conversations are about resistance
Level II conversations are about “wait and see“
Level III conversations are about co-creation
When we are threatened by others, cortisol can linger for 26 hours.
Children have the same capacity for conversational intelligence that adults do, but only if we have the courage to nurture their growth.

Resources Mentioned

Conversational Intelligence by Judith Glaser
Conversational Intelligence website

Activate Your Free Coaching for Leaders Membership
Get immediate access to my free, 10-day audio course, 10 Ways to Empower the People You Lead. Give me 10 minutes a day for 10 days to get the most immediate, practical actions to become a better leader. Join at CoachingforLeaders.com.
Related Episodes

CFL91: How to Listen When Someone is Venting
CFL161: How To Address Difficult Conversations
CFL177: How to Start a Conversation With Anyone

Next Episode
Murial Maignan Wilkins appears to help us discover how to improve our executive presence. She’s the co-author of the book Own the Room: Discover Your Signature Voice to Master Your Leadership Presence.
Thank You
Submit your question for consideration on the next question and answer show the first Monday of every month at http://coachingforleaders.com/feedback
Nov 14 2016
37 mins
Play

Rank #3: 316: Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel

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Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership
Tom Henschel (web) (podcast) grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through coaching and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership.
Key Points

An elevator speech is a crisp, concise, high-level summary of a complex, multi-layered topic.
It can be about whatever you do as a profession, but it can also be about anything else, like your recent vacation.
Elevator speeches get crafted … it doesn’t happen in the spur of the moment.
Creating an elevator speech doesn’t take long, but you have to choose to reflect.
An elevator speech is actually a conversation tailored to the other person.
Say a little bit, and then test the other person’s level of interest.
The longer you talk, the less effective you are.

The Three Qualities of a Great Elevator Speech

Keep it short
Be memorable
Tailor it to the listener

Resources Mentioned

Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office* by Lois P. Frankel
279: How to Grow Your Professional Network

Activate Your Free Coaching for Leaders Membership
Get immediate access to my free, 10-day audio course, 10 Ways to Empower the People You Lead. Give me 10 minutes a day for 10 days to get the most immediate, practical actions to become a better leader. Join at CoachingforLeaders.com.
Related Episodes

CFL272: Enhance Your Executive Presence
CFL279: How to Grow Your Professional Network
CFL300: Tom Henschel Interviews Dave

Next Episode
Bonni and I return for the monthly question and answer show. Submit your question for consideration next week or for the first question and answer show the first Monday of every month at http://coachingforleaders.com/feedback
Sep 25 2017
39 mins
Play

Rank #4: 148: The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens

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Leaders often hear about influence through storytelling, but don't know where to start. Here are four stories to tell and how to get started.
Guest: David Hutchens
DavidHutchens.com
Author of the Upcoming Book: Circle of the 9 Muses: A Storytelling Field Guide for Innovators

Storytelling is utilized for influence

“It’s more important to tell a strategic story, to tell the right story, even if you don’t tell it particularly well.” -David Hutchens

The starting point of telling stories is permission

Storytelling is a skill that nobody really has to learn since it’s our natural language

Leaders needs to give themselves permission to tell a story in their organization

The 4 stories leaders need to tell

Who we are stories - what it means to be us

Think about the stories parents and caregivers told you when you were young about what it was like growing up for them
When we do this, we impart information about what we believe and who we are today
Every organization and team has an origin story
David shared the origin story of General Electric
A story from a leader always has a reason for telling it
What are the identity and origin stories that you have?
Vision stories - the future we desire

These stories should be told in present tense language
You can tell a story about somebody else that is already doing what it is you envision
You might tell a story about someone else if it’s a big jump from where the organization is today
Values in action stories - how the espoused values show up in our organization

David mentioned Zappos and the stories they create about customer service
The stories being told also affect how members of the organization make future choices
The right story should reconnect people with why they really care about this work
Change and learning stories - the stories about a time we tried something and learned from it

This is generally the hardest story to tell
Think about the leaders you’ve loved and appreciated the most (the best ones do this well)
These stories can build culture and loyalty
David shared the failure story of New Coke
Here’s the structure:

I tried something
Here’s the bad result I got
Here’s why I got that bad result
Here’s how I’m now changing my behavior so I get a better result next time
Don’t try to change your voice and be a professional storyteller: talk like you

Feedback

On this topic: http://coachingforleaders.com/148
Comments, questions, or feedback: http://coachingforleaders.com/feedback

The final opportunity for listener survey is this week. Please take five minutes to complete the anonymous survey at: http://coachingforleaders.com/survey

Thank you to Arch Daws, Torrey Peace, Brent Miller, Bridget Blackford, Hector Gutierrez, David Welch, Jeff Trimble, Deepak Kahlon, Christy Owen, Leandro Soares, Kevin Kawada, Kevin McClelland, Katie Arnst, Mandy Blasby, Malcolm McDonald, Dawn Ranagan, and Henry Rihard Pasaribu for subscribing to my weekly update this past week. You can subscribe as well at http://coachingforleaders.com/subscribe
Jul 07 2014
39 mins
Play

Rank #5: 190: How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel

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Tom Henschel
Host, The Look & Sound of Leadership podcast and Executive Coach, Essential Communications
When it’s a development issue (or a way of thinking) it’s coaching that’s most helpful.

Tom says that coaching needs good goals, or at least one single goal over time.

Think about the goal as if it were on video — how do you want the end result to look?

“Coaching? It’s not about you.” -Tom Henschel

“The coaching process is helping someone understand, from their own point of view, why it would be in their benefit.” -Tom Henschel

Tom shared two stories from his teenage daughter Julia that helps him with coaching.

Food for thought:

Do people see coaching as part of their jobs? Do they have time for it?

To improve your coaching skills:

Let them go first.
Use open ended questions, such as, “What does that sound like to you?”
Earn the right to give advice.

Tom last appeared on these two episodes:

107: Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback with Tom Henschel
164: How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk with Tom Henschel
Feedback

Comments, questions, or feedback for future Q&A shows: http://coachingforleaders.com/feedback
The next Q&A show is episode 191 on the topic of books

Please join my weekly leadership guide. The leadership guide is delivered to your inbox each Wednesday and includes my thoughts and recommendations on the best articles, podcasts, videos, and books, to support your development between shows. It also includes a brief overview and link to the full weekly show notes. If you, like me, tend to listen to podcasts while you’re on the road or exercising, this will give you an easy way to follow-up later on the links and resources we mention in every show.

As a bonus, when you join the weekly leadership guide, you’ll get immediate access to my reader’s guide listing the 10 Leadership Books that Will Help You Get Better Results From Others with brief summaries from me on the value of each book. Download the 11-page reader's guide and 9-minute video of these book recommendations…plus, insight on the 2 books that I rely on weekly! http://coachingforleaders.com/subscribe
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Apr 27 2015
45 mins
Play

Rank #6: 161: How To Address Difficult Conversations

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Bonni and I respond to questions from the Coaching for Leaders community on how to handle difficult conversations and more.
Guest: Bonni Stachowiak
Teaching in Higher Ed

Question from Leonardo
I´m one of your fans, I listen your podcast every day and I see better results on my day job managing an emergency room in Brazilian Hospital. I'm a cardiologist and today I work as a manger also. I was listening the episode 143, about feedback, while I was driving to my job and I was thinking how difficult to me is receive a negative feedback. I think that what struggle in this situation is emotion and controlling the emotion to respond or give some excuse for that negative perception. When I give any feedback to my employees I saw this same problem. How do I train myself to be better on that?

Episode #143: Accepting Feedback With Sheila Heen of Difficult Conversations
Episode #107: Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback with Tom Henschel
Lets Get Real Or Let's Not Play by Mahan Khalsa*

Question from Dow

Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen*
The Dale Carnegie Course
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie*
Positive Coaching by Jim Thompson*

Question from Nathan
I am not currently in a "leadership" position but I feel that I am being called to leadership and feel that leadership and coaching is something that I would enjoy long term. I wanted to ask what recommendations you would have to really start moving in this direction and to start developing those skills. I've been trying to read books and listen to podcast to get some insight but haven't really had the opportunity to hone these skills. I am looking at going to toastmasters to get some experience/training in public speaking to get started working on something I don't feel I'm strong in. Do you have any recommendations of things like Toastmasters that I can check out or any suggestions on steps I could take to improve my leadership and coaching skills?

Toastmasters
Junior Chamber International (Jaycees)

Feedback

Join the conversation: http://coachingforleaders.com/161
Comments, questions, or feedback for future Q&A shows: http://coachingforleaders.com/feedback
Next Q&A show is episode #165 on Networking

Thank you to weekly update subscribers Jane Stachowiak, Melissa Minneci, Nick Smith, Adam Trainque, Jared Weikum, Guto Nicolazzi, Susan Smith, Federico De Obeso, Eduardo Mifano, John Mihalyo, Neil, Marcus Wallace, Adriana Ramirez, Tim Hill, Richard Carter, Clayton Dumcum, Jared Gonzalez, M. Key, Chris Bazille, Aaron Saray, Scott Bray, Chris Bean, Carina Costa, Shaun Ng, Rodney Freeman, Dow Tippett, Tom Kennedy, Kevin Lease, Jennifer Hammonds, David Kane, Francisco Prezoto, Marcia Roberts, Sharon Sauro, and Jennifer Mueller.

Receive the 10 Leadership Books That Will Help You Get Better Results From Others, including 2 books that I rely on weekly. You can subscribe at http://coachingforleaders.com/subscribe

Thank you also to David Wissore for leaving a written review on Stitcher and Eve Oliveira for leaving a written review on iTunes. If you've been listening to this show for a bit and feel like you can provide an honest review, kindly visit iTunes or Stitcher and leave a written review for the show. Thank you in advance!
Oct 06 2014
Play

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