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Education
Science & Medicine

Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast

Updated 8 months ago

Education
Science & Medicine
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Listen as we explore issues, ideas and research about wetlands in Canada. Wetlands are some of the most bio-diverse habitats in the country. Wetlands are vital to the health of a wide variety of mammals, birds, amphibians reptiles plants - and, of course human beings. We'll be interviewing research experts and frontline workers from Ducks Unlimited Canada in lively, engaging exchanges. They'll keep you up-to-date and up-to-speed on the best information and stories about these vital Canadian ecosystems.

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Listen as we explore issues, ideas and research about wetlands in Canada. Wetlands are some of the most bio-diverse habitats in the country. Wetlands are vital to the health of a wide variety of mammals, birds, amphibians reptiles plants - and, of course human beings. We'll be interviewing research experts and frontline workers from Ducks Unlimited Canada in lively, engaging exchanges. They'll keep you up-to-date and up-to-speed on the best information and stories about these vital Canadian ecosystems.

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
0
0
1
0

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
0
0
1
0
Cover image of Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast

Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast

Updated 8 months ago

Read more

Listen as we explore issues, ideas and research about wetlands in Canada. Wetlands are some of the most bio-diverse habitats in the country. Wetlands are vital to the health of a wide variety of mammals, birds, amphibians reptiles plants - and, of course human beings. We'll be interviewing research experts and frontline workers from Ducks Unlimited Canada in lively, engaging exchanges. They'll keep you up-to-date and up-to-speed on the best information and stories about these vital Canadian ecosystems.

Rank #1: Episode One - We Take Flight

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The Rundown This is the inaugural episode of the Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast. Welcome. Let's dive right into the content pond. In this episode you'll meet carp in a marsh and a researcher in the field. First, the carp. In it's heyday , the 1930s, the Delta Marsh, near Lake Manitoba, was home to a huge numbers of waterfowl. It was one of the great duck hunting destinations in North America. And, it attracted royalty, celebrities and hunters from all over the world. That was, before the carp. The invasive species muddied the marshes water, stirred up the bottom and generally made life miserable for the aquatic plants that called the marsh home. No plants, no ducks. Then scientists perfected the carp barrier and the marsh is bouncing back. You'll hear the story of a remarkable recovery. Next we pay a short visit to Matt Dyson a University of Waterloo field researcher. He tells us what it's really like in the woods, bogs and muck of the north as he does the real, on the ground work of a deep woods scientist. You'll find the bios of all the scientists we interviewed in this episode below. Making Contact Like to learn more about these topics and other aspects of wetlands restoration? You can at ducks.ca. And, you can email your questions and feedback to communications@ducks.ca. Guest Bios Dale Wrubleski, PhD Dale is Ducks Unlimited Canada’s lead research scientist at Delta Marsh. Trained as an entomologist, Wrubleski has more recently become an expert on native fish species and on the invasive carp that threaten the famed Manitoba wetland. Glen Suggett Glen grew up near the shores of Delta Marsh in the 1970s. Over the years, he’s seen the health of the iconic wetland deteriorate, as well as unsuccessful attempts to improve conditions. Rather than become discouraged, Suggett’s a part of the team working to restore Delta Marsh for the next generation. Together with Gordon Goldsborough, PhD, and members of the Delta History Group, Suggett authored Delta: A Prairie Marsh and its People, a book that introduces readers to the people who have relied on and enjoyed the marsh over the years. Few people know the history of Manitoba’s Delta Marsh as intimately as Gordon Goldsborough, PhD. A Winnipeg-born research scientist and natural storyteller, Goldsborough’s connection to Delta dates back to his days as a student at the University of Manitoba. As a water quality specialist, and professor at his alma mater, Goldsborough enjoys sharing the many reasons why Delta Marsh is so important for people and wildlife. Matt Dyson’s Twitter feed, much like his life, is anything but boring. The University of Waterloo student’s tweets alternate with images of cougars and ravens eating duck eggs. The photos of ravenous predators—captured by trail cameras—are part of Dyson’s ongoing doctoral research that takes him to northern Alberta each spring. While battling the landscape’s rugged elements, he’s studying the impact a changing boreal forest is having on predators—and in turn, on duck populations.

Feb 01 2017
25 mins
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Rank #2: Episode Four - Bling for Birds and Name That Duck!

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This episode is all about getting intel on birds: what they look like, where they hang out and where they go when they migrate.

Sep 01 2017
26 mins
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Rank #3: Episode Nine: World Wetlands Day and the Curious Courtships of Drakes

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In this episode we’ll be celebrating, in our small way, World Wetlands Day, which is on February 2th. This year that event is highlighting wetlands for a sustainable urban future. We’ll learn how those moist, mushy and fecund habitats do just that. Next up, we'll learn the odd ways drakes (those are male ducks) attract a mate, and how female ducks know just how to clue into the sometimes curious courtship rituals.

Feb 01 2018
28 mins
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Rank #4: Episode Three - Duck Feathers and Drones

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The Rundown Yukon-based eider researcher Jane Harms explains how a stress hormone in eiders can be a bellwether for climate change. Wetlands are delicate ecosystems. We discover how a flying robot can keep those wetlands safer.

Aug 01 2017
25 mins
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Rank #5: Episode Six: The Hunter Conservationist and the Radar Birds

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In this episode we explore the intertwingled intersection of conservation and hunting. Can you both care about wildlife and its habitat and take an animal’s life?  Next, rain, snow and sleet show up on meterologists’ radar screen. But sometimes weather boffins spot something else on their glowing monitors. Something else that has nothing to do with clouds, forecasts or humidex reports.

Nov 07 2017
31 mins
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Rank #6: Episode Eight - The Zen of Wildlife Photography

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In this first podcast of 2018 we talk with Brendan Kelly a conservationist and avid photographer from Paradise, Newfoundland. Kelly explains how taking the time to wait for his natural subjects allows him to tune into their habitats and appreciate them as remarkable, intelligent animals. You can see samples of his work on instagram at _brendankelly_

Jan 01 2018
21 mins
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Rank #7: Episode Five: The Rebirth of a Lagoon and Ducks Cold Feet

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This episode begins with a remarkable story about vision, persistence and, sewage. It’s the tale of the little town of Niverville, Manitoba and its groundbreaking solution to dealing with night soil. Next, as winter approaches we ask the question everybody thinks of when they stroll past frozen ponds. It’s about ducks and feet.

Oct 04 2017
23 mins
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Rank #8: Episode Two - Of Fish Ladders and Duck Eggs

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The Rundown Why do maritime fish fight currents, waterfalls and man-made barriers to get to inland ponds and lakes to spawn? What barriers do they face? How does that odd behaviour help the ecology of wetlands? And, how can we make their job easier? We talk with Nic McLellan, the Atlantic Science Coordinator for Ducks Unlimited Canada to find out. Plus, we discover what tracking road race runners has to do with counting fish. Did you know ducklings have their own social network? No spoilers, but you'll be amazed by how those little ducks make sure they all share the same birthday, thanks to a quick chat we had with Dave Howerter. He's the Director of National Conservation Operations at Ducks Unlimited Canada. Dave's up on the equivalent of bird Twitter. Listen up. Making Contact Like to learn more about these topics and other aspects of wetlands conservation? You can at ducks.ca. And, you can email your questions and feedback to communications@ducks.ca. Guest Bios Nic McLellan Conservation Programs Specialist, Atlantic Canada Nic McLellan grew up in Sackville, NB where he developed a keen interest in biology and the outdoors. Prior to his current job at Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC), Nic worked on several research projects with the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. These projects involved a variety of bird species including shorebirds, songbirds, seabirds, and waterfowl. David Howerter, PhD Director, National Conservation Operations Dave Howerter is an accomplished scientist with a track record of successfully managing a complex scientific program, demonstrated ability to build teams, build consensus, and develop partnerships. Dave is responsible for all programs national in scope related to engineering, education, international partnerships, government relations, research and conservation planning.    

Jul 01 2017
24 mins
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Rank #9: Episode Seven - How to Freeze a Frog and Cook a Goose

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In this special episode we’re walking in a winter wonder wetland to find out what lies beneath when the weather outside is frightful. Next our goose gets cooked, the right way. We’ll chat with a cook and wildlife expert who eschews a holiday turkey for a Dickens of a bird.

Dec 01 2017
27 mins
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Rank #10: Episode Eleven: Of Keemen and Other Volunteers

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In celebration of DUC’s 80th anniversary this episode is all about volunteers. Volunteers, those men and women whose passion let’s them eschew pay cheques, have been a vital part of DUC since it’s earliest, distant days. First up I chat with Leigh Patterson, a DUC staffer who’s just finished a quest for Keeman.  The keeman name? Listen in. Then I have a quick conversation with a super volunteer, Serge Mathieu. Serge love ducks. And he’s a maniac for the green head DUC’s logo, as you’ll

Apr 02 2018
24 mins
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