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Rank #164 in TV & Film category

TV & Film

The No Film School Podcast

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #164 in TV & Film category

TV & Film
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The No Film School Podcast is the audio channel of nofilmschool.com, the leading worldwide community of filmmakers, video producers, and independent creatives. No Film School is where filmmakers learn from each other — “no film school” required. Our podcasts feature interviews with leading filmmakers and industry authorities, check-ins from major film festivals, and our weekly news update, Indie Film Weekly.

Read more

The No Film School Podcast is the audio channel of nofilmschool.com, the leading worldwide community of filmmakers, video producers, and independent creatives. No Film School is where filmmakers learn from each other — “no film school” required. Our podcasts feature interviews with leading filmmakers and industry authorities, check-ins from major film festivals, and our weekly news update, Indie Film Weekly.

iTunes Ratings

232 Ratings
Average Ratings
188
21
10
6
7

If you listen to 1 filmmaking podcast make it NFS!

By JV editor - Oct 25 2018
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I have subscribed to six filmmaking and camera equipment podcasts over the past 3 years but found with nofilmschool, I can now listen to a single program and get the latest gear news, learn about what's trending in the industry, and be entertained. I relied on NFS for insight on purchases of cameras, lenses, audio gear and lights. And Charles actually convinced me to NOT spend money now on gear that is not essential. Hosts are talented and include a USC Film School MFA grad who is a film school professor in New York. SUBSCRIBE!

Stop the jimjohnjim joke please

By Aman000003 - Oct 11 2018
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Good podcast but hearing that joke for the 1000th time is making me want to unsubscribe

iTunes Ratings

232 Ratings
Average Ratings
188
21
10
6
7

If you listen to 1 filmmaking podcast make it NFS!

By JV editor - Oct 25 2018
Read more
I have subscribed to six filmmaking and camera equipment podcasts over the past 3 years but found with nofilmschool, I can now listen to a single program and get the latest gear news, learn about what's trending in the industry, and be entertained. I relied on NFS for insight on purchases of cameras, lenses, audio gear and lights. And Charles actually convinced me to NOT spend money now on gear that is not essential. Hosts are talented and include a USC Film School MFA grad who is a film school professor in New York. SUBSCRIBE!

Stop the jimjohnjim joke please

By Aman000003 - Oct 11 2018
Read more
Good podcast but hearing that joke for the 1000th time is making me want to unsubscribe
Cover image of The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #164 in TV & Film category

Read more

The No Film School Podcast is the audio channel of nofilmschool.com, the leading worldwide community of filmmakers, video producers, and independent creatives. No Film School is where filmmakers learn from each other — “no film school” required. Our podcasts feature interviews with leading filmmakers and industry authorities, check-ins from major film festivals, and our weekly news update, Indie Film Weekly.

Rank #1: 8.9.19: Can You Tell When The Project You're Working On is Good?

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Tarantino's 'Boogie Nights' complaint gets dissected by George and Charles, who also dig deep on film stock and early landmarks in filmmaking technology.
From the silent era to porn in the 70's we touch on the whole lot this week.
Aug 09 2019
42 mins
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Rank #2: 8.1.2019: Once Upon A Time in (No) Film School

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8.1.2019: Once Upon A Time in (No) Film School by No Film School
Aug 02 2019
43 mins
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Rank #3: Pitching Do's and Don’ts: How to Get Your Film Funded

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This week’s guests have heard over 10,000 pitches between them and, in this episode, they reveal what works and what doesn't when you're trying to raise money for your films. No Film School’s Liz Nord is joined by Molly O’Brien (Chief Business Development Officer of Fork Films), Daniel Chalfen (Co-founder of Naked Edge Films), and Jose Rodriguez (Director of Documentary Programs at the Tribeca Film Institute) to discuss the art of the pitch.
Sep 25 2017
34 mins
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Rank #4: Why You Need to Stop Making Excuses and Make a Short Film

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To say that it’s tough to play your short at Sundance is an understatement. In 2018, 69 shorts were picked from 8,740 submissions. While there’s no simple formula on how to make a short film will get into Sundance, programmer Dilcia Barerra told No Film School that there is one important guiding principle for filmmakers that do get in: be authentic to your reality and your style. Anything contrived is obvious to programmers. While at Sundance, Oakley Anderson Moore sat down with five filmmakers whose short films embody just that authentic quality that you instantly recognize in a really good short. Their conversation can offer you insight on how to make a good film that’s authentic to your voice.
Feb 26 2018
50 mins
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Rank #5: How to Shoot a Feature Film for Only $7000

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With only $7K, fourteen days, and no crew, Alejandro Montoya Marín made a chockablock action-comedy feature. If you're wondering why these parameters, here's the reason: it took $7000 bucks for Robert Rodriguez to shoot his breakout film El Mariachi. And since it’s the 25th anniversary of that film, Rodriguez decided to host a show with El Rey called Rebel Without a Crew where he picks five filmmakers to each make a feature using the same arsenal. Marín was one of those filmmakers! The contingency of being on the show was that you would make a feature film with $7K and only fourteen shooting days -- with only a plus-one as your crew. In this conversation, NFS contributors Oakley Anderson Moore and Chris Boone talk to Marín about how he was able to pull all this off, and how ultimately, this experience was the perfect way to get past the hurdle where he can now himself a filmmaker.
Aug 06 2018
52 mins
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Rank #6: How to Make a Movie Entirely on Your Own

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Before "Ramblin Freak'," Tacodeli employee Parker Smith had made only one movie featuring sound. The three three-time film school dropout was stuck between a rock and a hard place after realizing his internship at The Austin Film Society was little more than the theater job he had left in Boulder, Colorado to make a name for himself in Texas. Now, the task of making your first feature is a daunting one. Some would think that filming it entirely alone should make things a hundred times more difficult. For Parker, however, being the only member of his film crew provided him with exactly the freedom necessary to experiment, learn and shoot his movie right.   No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Smith at SXSW to learn how he pulled off making a movie about a guy who doesn't know how to make a movie. From watching five documentaries a night to finding a producer through Instagram, he provides us with tremendous insight into the art of learning as you go.
Mar 27 2017
33 mins
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Rank #7: What It Takes to Get Your Short into Sundance

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For all intents and purposes, the Sundance Film Festival is the Holy Grail for many short filmmakers around the world. Need proof? Just take a look at the number of entries to this year's competition: 9,000. It would take an army to sift through that much content. Or at least a highly dedicated and skilled team of programmers. Even with that sort of team in place, it seems like there has to be some element of luck involved with getting into one of the country's most prestigious festivals. In this episode of The No Film School Podcast, producer Jon Fusco and writer Oakley Anderson-Moore conduct a roundtable discussion with crew members from three of the 68 films presented in this year's shorts program. Included in the discussion are Rob Savage, Jed Shepherd and Douglas Cox from Dawn of the Deaf, a sign language zombie movie made with the deaf community in London; Native American filmmaker, Lyle Corbine Jr. who's latest short Shinaab marks his fifteenth film; and Jessica Beshir and Charlie Hoxie, who round out the group with their film Hairat, which details the strange nightly ritual of an Ethiopian man who feeds hyenas by dangling meat from a stick in his mouth. The result is a fascinating dissection of the steps each filmmaker took to find their place at Sundance. You'll find more than a few nuggets of advice in there to aid in your own short filmmaking projects.
Feb 13 2017
51 mins
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Rank #8: Don't Wait for Somebody to Make Your Movie, Do it Yourself: The Winning Mantra Behind 'Thunder Road'

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Some would say that Jim Cummings' journey to winning this year's SXSW Grand Jury Prize for best narrative feature started back in 2016 when his short film "Thunder Road" won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance. Yes, the short, which many consider one of the greatest of all time, was the source for their feature adaptation, but in reality, Jim's journey to SXSW royalty started long before "Thunder Road." And while he's certainly the star of this film, it would also be unfair to say that Jim made this journey alone. Between Jim, the film's creative director Danny Madden, and producer Ben Wiessner, the tight-knit crew behind the film have worked together on projects at SXSW for the last seven years in a row. In 2018, their production company ORNANA, wasn't only in Austin to represent "Thunder Road", but also for the Vimeo Staff Pick Award-winning short "Krista." Mere hours after winning their respective awards, the team was already at it again, creating a video and launching a Kickstarter for the feature-length version of Krista. Even with a Grand Jury Prize from Sundance at their disposal, Jim and crew found it impossible to find anyone who would produce their feature. But that didn't stop them. It just fueled the fire more. "Thunder Road", which tells the story of an eccentric police officer whose mourning over his mother's death leads to disastrous consequences, is the result of a decade of strong team building, work ethic, and an unrelenting desire to get stories told. Joining Producer Jon Fusco on the podcast today are several members of the producing team that made it happen, Ben Wiessner, Natalie Metzger and Matt Miller. cinematographer Lowell Meyer (who himself had three projects in competition at the festival) and of course: writer, director and actor, Officer Arnaud himself, Jim Cummings. We discuss all aspects of production which surround their mantra: "Don't wait for somebody to make your movie, do it yourself."
Mar 26 2018
26 mins
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Rank #9: How Do You Make a Film with Zero Experience? The First Short: THE GUY [Episode 1]

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A short film is a tricky thing, you don’t know how much time or money to invest in such a personal thing that nobody may even end up seeing, so a lot of people don’t even try. The point of this podcast is to get you to stop worrying and just try.

In this episode, No Film School Producer Jon Fusco identifies the key crew you'll need to get started and how to them on your project, how to create a proper lookbook, what to plan for on a location scout, strategies in collaborating with your DP in pre-production and how to obtain the best gear for your project.
Aug 27 2018
59 mins
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Rank #10: IFW 7.5.18: Where to Live for a Career in Film & How to Spend Your Camera Budget

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In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Charles Haine discuss how the extension of California’s Production Tax Credits is affecting the film and TV business, and the fate of ‘Supersize Me 2’ in the wake of director Morgan Spurlock’s sexual assault accusations. We also say a sad goodbye to the journalists killed last week at the Capital Gazette newspaper. In gear news, we geek out about 10Gb ethernet. Charles answers an Ask No Film School question about how to find your perfect camera and the best way to invest your gear budget. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
Jul 05 2018
46 mins
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Rank #11: How to Start a Production Company: From Film School to Raising Money Out of Your Bedroom Office

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In this episode of the No Film School podcast, Emily Buder sits down with David Ethan Shapiro, CEO of Starlight Studios, and Jacob Schulsinger, editor ("Force Majeure," "Antichrist"), to discuss their Sundance premiere, "Come Swim," Kristen Stewart's experimental short film. We talk the merits of film school and why it's important to recreate that creative atmosphere in your career, the secret to raising money as a producer, why editors should help directors write movies, and more.
Mar 06 2017
43 mins
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Rank #12: How to Avoid the Crucial Mistakes Everyone Makes on their First Movie

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At Tribeca, No Film School's Emily Buder sat down with first time director Sophie Brooks and her producer, David Brooks, who also happens to be her brother. Their film The Boy Downstairs went through a very well structured series of steps to prepare it for a premiere at a major festival. The duo talk the strategies they put in place to prevent Sophie from making the same mistakes any other first-time director would make. From test screenings to re-writes, they share some great tips that you can borrow on the lead up to your own future releases.
Jun 05 2017
49 mins
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Rank #13: Best of the The No Film School Podcast 2017, Part 1

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Well, it's been quite a year. Here at No Film School, we started doing interview podcasts every single week in addition to our Indie Film Weekly episodes. We’ve had tons of great guests from Sean Baker to Flying Lotus and everything in between and we’re all really proud of the type of resource this podcast has become. Before we conduct each interview, we'll take the time to remind our guests that this will be a different sort of interview than the other ones they’ve been doing on the press junket or at the festivals. We’re not just interested in hearing about what makes their movie great. Rather, we want to frame these episodes as educational gems, with takeaways from their experiences that every one of our listeners can put into practice. In that sense, we really think we’ve succeeded. If you went back and listened to every single one of our interview episodes that came out this year, we're confident that you’ll come out with more than enough information to get yourself started on making your film. You’ll be all out of excuses. Over the next couple weeks, editor/producer Jon Fusco will be leading you through some of our best clips of 2017, so if you haven’t heard all of our interview podcasts, these episodes will be a great overview of those pearls of advice that may end up helping you down the road.
Dec 28 2017
41 mins
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Rank #14: One Hundred Different Ways to Get Your Film Funded

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Hayley Pappas (Head of RYOT Films), Caroline von Kuhn (Director of Artist Development at SFFILM), and Leah Giblin (Head of Grants at Cinereach) are responsible for getting millions of dollars to independent filmmakers each year through grants and financing. They join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss the many ways independent films are being funded today, and how you can access these various funding sources for your films.
Oct 15 2018
56 mins
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Rank #15: How Do You Become a Screenwriter? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 3]

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In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, we dive into the screenwriting process on No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur (out now!). This episode covers many screenwriting tips and tricks, including: Tracking your hours to ensure you prioritize screenwriting in your life; Brainstorming out loud and recording yourself so you don't forget a lightbulb moment; Writing your first draft by hand to ensure you finish it and you can't go back and edit; Spending >50% of your time NOT in screenwriting software — researching, outlining, breaking the story; Why applying for grants can be helpful even if you don't win them; The Sundance Screenwriters Lab (which we did an entire podcast on at Sundance); Doing entire drafts from the perspective of supporting characters; Apps like Workflowy, Final Draft, and WriterDuet; and Workshopping your script with actors at table reads. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature.
Apr 11 2018
55 mins
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Rank #16: How Post-Production Makes or Breaks a Film, Part 1: The Editor's Process

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The difference between a film that has some good moments and a full-fledged, unhindered story hinges on how it's treated in post-production. That success starts with the delicate navigation of the editor. Sitting down at this past Sundance Film Festival, a handful of talented post-production artists who worked on some of the most cutting-edge indie films of 2018, discuss how they work to make brilliant, award-winning films. In Part 1 of this podcast, we focus on the role of the editor, their process of working with directors, and how they articulate the nuanced philosophy behind their craft.
May 14 2018
43 mins
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Rank #17: 'Don't be Afraid if You Didn't Go To Film School': The Method to Success Behind 'Greener Grass'

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Greener Grass is a project that has been on a whirlwind path to success since the very beginning.

Directors Jocelyn DeBoer and Dawn Luebbe's first iteration of the surreal comedy turned heads as a short film back in 2016, when it won awards at major festivals like SXSW and the Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival in France.

Upon its release online, it also achieved viral status and earned distinctions from Short of the Week and Vimeo. It's rare that a short finds success like that both on the festival circuit and online, but hey, when you watch Greener Grass, it's easy to see why.

Though they claim to have had no intention of doing so initially, the duo expanded the short into a feature film which hit Sundance in a big way back in January.

The film's meticulously crafted aesthetic places it on a level somewhere between Adult Swim and David Lynch. With the aid of talented production designers, costume designers, and a brilliantly specific script, DeBoer and Luebbe's film brings us into a candy-coated utopia that we've never seen the likes of in film before.

Of course, things descend into dystopia by the time the film's through. Suburban tensions reach their boiling point after one mom willingly gives up her daughter to a friend, who I might add later goes on to give birth to a bouncing baby soccer ball.

Things get weird. But not odd enough to sway IFC Midnight from purchasing the film earlier this week, or SXSW programming it into their festival to be seen in Austin later this week.

Jon Fusco sat down with the directors and producer Natalie Metzger at Sundance this year to talk about using characters to build a world, hiring geniuses as collaborators and more.
Mar 11 2019
29 mins
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Rank #18: Yorgos Lanthimos on How to Shoot Surrealist Film

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If you've seen any of Yorgos Lanthimos' films, then you know the Greek director isn't afraid to put anything on the screen. Like many famous surrealists, Lanthimos isn't interested in exploring stories where things go right, he wants his audience to see what's wrong in the world.

To him, nothing is off limits and any dark side of the human psyche is worth exploring. In surrealist film, any image can be too much or too little. It's a delicate balance, but one that Lanthimos has truly mastered with his latest film The Favourite.

A period piece set in early 18th century England, a frail Queen Anne Olivia Colman, occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) governs the country in her stead. When a new servant Abigail (Emma Stone) arrives, however, her charm endears her to Sarah and a competition to be the queens favorite emerges.

In this interview, Lanthimos is joined by screenwriter Tony McNamara to discuss how commercial work early in his career ended up steering him in the complete opposite direction, not conforming to filmic norms, and breaking every possible rule you can.
Nov 26 2018
25 mins
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Rank #19: How Starting a Production Company Can Help You Make Your First Film

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Ashley McKenzie is the type of director that does it all. The Canadian multi-hyphenate runs her own production company, writes her own scripts, and directs all of the company's films. When she’s on set, however, she gives up almost all notions of planning and control to make her shots as organic and in the moment as possible.

For her debut feature, Werewolf, which has won awards at almost every regional Canadian festival she’s brought it to, this included throwing the actors into real-life situations, adding events into scenes without telling them, keeping the camera rolling after the scene had cut, and even casting non-actors as key characters at locations on the fly.

The film itself follows a pair of outcast methadone users who push a rusty lawnmower door-to-door to cut grass for money to feed their addiction. No Film School’s Jon Fusco sat down with McKenzie and her two lead actors Andrew Gillis and Breagh MacNeil to discuss their intensely real collaboration.
Jun 26 2017
25 mins
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